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Old 09-30-2013, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Northeast Ohio
319 posts, read 364,749 times
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I'm not big on corn in its natural form, and I stay far away from HFCS, but I love corn tortillas and cornbread.
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Old 09-30-2013, 02:39 PM
 
4,829 posts, read 4,808,096 times
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Default By 2012, 88 percent of corn (maize) and 94 percent of soy grown in the United States were genetically modified, accordin

Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Or

I hate made-up numbers, especially when real numbers are easy to find.

Although the actual percentage of transgenetic corn grown in the US is high, it is not quite that high. USDA figures show that 85% of the 2013 corn crops planted were Herbicide Tolerant (HT) types....
85%, 88% or 95% what difference does it make for a forum post? Most of the American corn is GMO it's the point. Nitpicking of this sort is appropriate for criticizing a Ph.D. thesis but for a forum post my recollected numbers were more than adequate. Especially considering fluctuating numbers from USDA like this:

By 2012, 88 percent of corn (maize) and 94 percent of soy grown in the United States were genetically modified, according to the US Department of Agriculture.

Besides they studied heirloom Mexican corn (far away from the Midwestern corn fields) and they found it to be GMO contaminated. Google "a paper published in Nature showing how genes from GM corn entered local varieties of the plant in Mexico, where GM crops are banned". Considering this finding it's safe to assume that 100% of the corn grown in USA is GMO, regardless whether it's classified as GMO by USDA or not.
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Old 09-30-2013, 04:17 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,571 posts, read 42,741,316 times
Reputation: 57249
Corn is just a wonderful, life sustaining staple food, but just don't think of it as a vegetable, but think of it as a starch (like a potato).
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 22,625,162 times
Reputation: 10524
Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
85%, 88% or 95% what difference does it make for a forum post?
Most of the American corn is GMO it's the point.
Not making stuff up is the point for me, especially when the facts are so easy to check.

Besides, the topic of this thread is fresh sweet corn, the kind people eat. And it constitutes only 1/3 of 1% of the total of the corn grown in the US. So bringing up scary stats about field corn is deceptive. And making up an assumption that 100% of the corn is now GMO is just empty rhetoric, for no good reason.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:28 PM
 
4,829 posts, read 4,808,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Not making stuff up is the point for me, especially when the facts are so easy to check.

Besides, the topic of this thread is fresh sweet corn, the kind people eat. And it constitutes only 1/3 of 1% of the total of the corn grown in the US. So bringing up scary stats about field corn is deceptive. And making up an assumption that 100% of the corn is now GMO is just empty rhetoric, for no good reason.
Are you sure it's 85% and not 86% or 87.3%? Internet data vary. To be a valid forum poster shouldn't we conduct a statics research to provide a few readers with averages, mean, & standard deviation in order to be able to claim "I'm not making stuff up"? Shall we use numbers like 86.9996% in order to make a valid forum point? Your nitpicking is absolutely ridiculous and pointless.

So, if supposedly non GMO Mexican corn is thoroughly contaminated with GMO strains and GMO technology is prohibited in Mexico it's only logical to conclude that "assumption that 100% of the corn (in USA) is now GMO is just empty rhetoric".
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn,NY
10,328 posts, read 12,421,365 times
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Love it. Enjoy corn on the cob esp at Coney Island in the summer. And can't live without corn tortilla and salsa. Bring on the corn!!
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Old 10-02-2013, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,434 posts, read 41,645,868 times
Reputation: 46995
We had fresh corn in some form every other day this summer. We bought it all at the Carrboro, N.C. Farmers Market. I will miss fresh corn this winter.
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:55 PM
 
3,322 posts, read 3,564,401 times
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We had so much sweet corn given to us this summer we couldn't eat it all. I'm trying something new this year, I wrapped the un-husked ears in foil and put them right in the freezer. No husking, no cooking, nuttin'. I'm planning on putting them in the oven when I decide I need some fresh corn. So, opinions on how long they will take in the oven? I'm thinking I probably shouldn't let them defrost first....Anybody do this before? Anyone have an idea for me as per baking temperature and time? Open D? I'm sure you have an opinion.
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Old 10-02-2013, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,150,957 times
Reputation: 2091
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
GMO corn is just fine. By growing GMO corn farmers keep pesticide useage low and non-toxic. And FWIW, all corn for human consumption is so far non-GMO. Just some information to think about. BTW, I love me some corn on the cob. One reason to embrace summer.
Yeah I don't know about that...

Quote:
in a just-released paper published in the peer-reviewed Environmental Sciences Europe, Chuck Benbrook, research professor at Washington State University's Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, shreds that claim. He found that Monsanto's Roundup Ready technology, which dominates corn, soy, and cotton farming, has called forth a veritable monsoon of herbicides, both in terms of higher application rates for Roundup, and, in recent years, growing use of other, more-toxic herbicides.Benbrook found that overall, GMO technology drove up herbicide use by 527 million pounds, or about 11 percent, between 1996 (when Roundup Ready crops first hit farm fields) and 2011. But it gets worse. For several years, the Roundup Ready trait actually did meet Monsanto's promise of decreasing overall herbicide use—herbicide use dropped by about 2 percent between 1996 and 1999, Benbrook told me in an interview. But then weeds started to develop resistance to Roundup, pushing farmers to apply higher per-acre rates. In 2002, farmers using Roundup Ready soybeans jacked up their Roundup application rates by 21 percent, triggering a 19 million pound overall increase in Roundup use.
Since then, an herbicide gusher has been uncorked. By 2011, farms using Roundup Ready seeds were using 24 percent more herbicide than non-GMO farms planting the same crops, Benbrook told me. What happened? By that time, "in all three crops [corn, soy, and cotton], resistant weeds had fully kicked in," Benbrook said, and farmers were responding both by ramping up use of Roundup and resorting to older, more toxic herbicides like 2,4-D.

How GMOs Unleashed a Pesticide Gusher | Mother Jones
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Old 10-02-2013, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,150,957 times
Reputation: 2091
I love grilled corn on the cob with mayonnaise, lemon juice, chiltepin powder, and cotija cheese.

The varieties grown for the grocery store are usually watery and taste like crap though, so I don't eat corn very often. Mostly just in the summer when I can find good heirloom varieties.

Seems like it's getting harder and harder to buy produce that tastes like it's supposed to with stuff being picked too early and all the flavor being bred out of things in pursuit of increased yields. Buying peaches is a complete gamble. I bought peaches this year that were completely out of this world, and others that were mealy, not sweet, and had barely any flavor at all. A lot of the peaches I bought never even ripened. They went from rock hard to growing mold, completely skipping the ripe phase. You never know until you buy them.

Last edited by EugeneOnegin; 10-02-2013 at 09:36 PM..
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