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Old 02-10-2008, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City area
66 posts, read 219,255 times
Reputation: 30

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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Without looking it up, do you know what scrapple is?

Supposedly it's nearly exclusive to Philadelphia, Delaware, Central and Southern Jersey, and Eastern Pennsylvania.

When I lived in Central Jersey, scrapple was readily available.

I used to eat it, until I knew what it was made of.
Mother used to make it for us as kids, scrapple eggs for breakfast, and I would eat it again to this day, if only I could find it in Oklahoma!

How I miss it!
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Old 10-15-2008, 05:53 AM
 
Location: USA
13,228 posts, read 7,277,975 times
Reputation: 9573
Everything but the oink!
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Old 10-15-2008, 06:14 AM
RHB
 
1,096 posts, read 1,830,740 times
Reputation: 945
I'm in Maine, and just finished a hog butchering workshop...people there were dissappointed that we didn't learn to make scraple..We did make head cheese.
We also made a pate' which wasn't that bad. I mention Maine because I'm not sure how regional it really is, I've also seen it in CA and CT
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Old 10-15-2008, 08:26 AM
 
2,790 posts, read 5,574,157 times
Reputation: 1913
I think it is also found in parts of Ohio.
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Old 10-15-2008, 02:22 PM
MB2
 
Location: Sebastian/ FL
3,496 posts, read 8,562,567 times
Reputation: 2688
I am not sure, but, when I lived up in Pennsylvania, you were able to find Scrapple ANYWHERE, and also made FRESH by plenty of local butchers.
Some people up there swear by it, and look at you in disbelieve, when you state that you "don't really care for it".....LOL.
Had it once or twice, fried up, and I guess it's edible.
But, certainly NOT on my favorite list.

The only way I have found Scrapple down here in Florida, was in the frozen state....never fresh.

And, yes, any and everything from the hog goes in there...but, that would never stop me from eating it.
I'd rather prefer pancakes, sausage and eggs for my breakfast....LOL.
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Old 10-16-2008, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Kauai, HI
1,036 posts, read 3,946,433 times
Reputation: 815
Yum I grew up on Scrapple. Yeah, the idea of what it actually is kind of freaks me out, but it tastes so good- so who cares? Add a little ketchup on it and serve it with fried eggs and I'm good to go!
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Old 10-22-2008, 12:55 PM
 
4 posts, read 12,820 times
Reputation: 10
Talking scrapple :)

i find it amusing to read these comments about scrapple. i too grew up in "the scrapple region" (in eastern PA) and when I was younger - young enough that our parents wouldn't dare tell us what was in scrapple so we'd eat it! - we have family gatherings and "butcher weekends" where we'd purchase a half a pig from a butcher per two families and spend the weekend carving and grinding and boiling. some of my fondest childhood memories were of my dad and uncles standing over gigantic cast-iron kettles engaged in a "Scrapple cook-off" in which the "teams" of fathers by half a pig would compete against each other with their own "offal" and see whose scrapple came out tasting better. the last morning always ended with a big brunch of scrapple, bacon, sausage and ham

It is amazing to me that a lot of people I've met in the past couple of years since joining the military have no idea what scrapple is. Or stromboli, or pierogies, for that matter.
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Old 11-10-2008, 10:17 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,821,151 times
Reputation: 18521
Quote:
Originally Posted by coley27 View Post
i find it amusing to read these comments about scrapple. i too grew up in "the scrapple region" (in eastern PA) and when I was younger - young enough that our parents wouldn't dare tell us what was in scrapple so we'd eat it! - we have family gatherings and "butcher weekends" where we'd purchase a half a pig from a butcher per two families and spend the weekend carving and grinding and boiling. some of my fondest childhood memories were of my dad and uncles standing over gigantic cast-iron kettles engaged in a "Scrapple cook-off" in which the "teams" of fathers by half a pig would compete against each other with their own "offal" and see whose scrapple came out tasting better. the last morning always ended with a big brunch of scrapple, bacon, sausage and ham
This is probably the most accurate post of the bunch. Scrapple is generally made of scraps from the butchering process - parts like head meat and other various scraps that are mixed with buckwheat. I have had some very good scrapple over the years. However, some of the absolute worst I ever had was at the Reading Terminal Market at an Amish stand. It was completely flavorless and looked as if if was deep fried rather than grilled.

In Swiss parts of Ohio, they make a product called Panhaus which is the same as scrapple but is made with cornmeal.

In German regions around Cincinnati and Southeastern Indiana, the scraps are mixed with pin oatmeal (not the standard oatmeal) and called goetta.

Do realize that since this was a byproduct of the butchering process, it was generally produced in "butchering months" ; March and April in the spring and October and November in the fall months. Generally, you would get 12-15 loaf pans per pig according to my parents and my in-laws. It is one of those foods - like the Thanksgiving turkey - that you really look forward to ... and then you are kind of glad when it is all consumed.
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Old 11-11-2008, 05:38 AM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,584 posts, read 32,635,770 times
Reputation: 16781
Damn right I know what it is. My dad raised us on it, although we grew up in So Cal. There was actually a local market that carried it fresh. Can't find it now.

Scrapple is the first thing I look for when I'm in PA. The best I've had was at at little truck stop in Yocumtown. I like it fried crisp and dark brown, and depending on my mood, I'll top it with ketchup or maple syrup.
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Old 11-11-2008, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Mill Creek Hundred
293 posts, read 637,851 times
Reputation: 505
It's funny. Outsiders always ask "What's in scrapple?" I always tell them it's the stuff the guys in the hotdog factory scrape off their shoes at the end of the shift. Now shut up and try it. Once they try it, they stop asking and just want some more.

It should be sliced thin and fried in butter until it's real crispy on the outside.

When we order it out, I have them start cooking it when we order drinks. That way, when the rest of the order is ready, so is the scrapple.
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