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Old 01-10-2014, 08:12 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,813 posts, read 4,310,305 times
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Believe it or not, it can be found here in Rio Grande Valley of Texas, in the freezer section of the grocery store. We, nor anyone we know, buys this. Every October or so, we are inundated here with people from up north--they are called "Winter Texans" in order to make them think they are welcome additions to the local community.

I've also seen lutefisk in the grocery's freezer section.

I guess the local grocery store managers think that these items are something the "Winter Texans" want to see. From reading about it, they may be coming here to escape it!

I have no doubt whatsoever that locals would never buy the stuff.
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Old 01-11-2014, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,473 posts, read 13,409,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptsum View Post
Scrabble is not just in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, you can get it all over Maryland, Delaware, in parts of northern Virginia in some parts of West Virginia. I grew up on the stuff, and yes it is an acquired taste, one of the biggest name brands as Rapa Brand, it's located in Bridgeville, Delaware, and every year they have a Scrapple and Apple Festival. According to Rapa, here are the ingredients, pork stock, pork livers, pork fat, pork snout's, corn meal, pork hearts, wheat flour, salt, spices. What they do is grind up all the pork scraps, mix in some cornmeal and some spices.
I used to love potted meat. Then I read the ingredients one day. "Choice portions of snout." WTHeck is a choice portion of a nose? Are some noses just not as good as others? These were questions I didn't want to be saddled with. So, g'bye potted meat.
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Old 01-11-2014, 06:20 AM
 
Location: NW Philly Burbs
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Grew up on the stuff - didn't question what was in it, but knew it was various meat and seasonings, somewhat like sausage. We often had scrapple and eggs for supper, but I haven't had it since I was a kid. It was just ok. I'm more of a Spam girl!
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Old 01-11-2014, 06:32 AM
 
6,122 posts, read 5,147,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I ate scrapple as a kid too. But If we're talking Philly region weird meat products, then PORK ROLL takes the cake!

Mmmm, pork roll & cheese on an english muffin.

I grew up in Berks County, Pennsylvania, and a "smokey burger" (Taylor Pork Roll in a hamburger bun) was one of my favorite school lunches.

Scrapple - bleccchh!!!! My grandmother fried up a big pan of it every morning in the wintertime and I was forced to choke it down before school. Applesauce (I don't like that either) or maple syrup on it didn't help drown out the taste. My nightmare would be when we'd have it again for supper with fried potatoes.

On trips back home, when I'm frying up some eggs and bacon or sausage for breakfast, my mother will say, "There's scrapple in the refrigerator." I don't think she remembers how much I hated it, and I hope she's not buying it just for me.

Edit: I have a co-worker whose husband raises and butchers pigs on their farm, and she did not know what scrapple is. This is in Western Pa.
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Old 01-11-2014, 09:02 AM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,813 posts, read 4,310,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 70Ford View Post
I used to love potted meat. Then I read the ingredients one day. "Choice portions of snout." WTHeck is a choice portion of a nose? Are some noses just not as good as others? These were questions I didn't want to be saddled with. So, g'bye potted meat.
Lol--grew up eating "potted meat". What is in "imitation" potted meat? Something worse than snouts?
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Old 01-11-2014, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
16,929 posts, read 19,666,757 times
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This reminds me of a funny story. We were coming back from Washington DC heading towards Delaware to visit my BIL and we stopped at a gas station in Maryland. I see in the refrigerator case a package that said scrapple. I asked my husband what it was and he laughed and said "You won't eat that" We got a dirty look from the woman behind the counter. I guess we insulted her LOL. He told me what's in it and I gagged. Hubby has tried it and said it's ok but he likes Taylor pork roll better.
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Old 07-17-2014, 06:50 AM
 
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Default scrapple in VA

I just left Virginia where they have beef scrapple, scrapple with bacon, and or course original scrapple, Rappa brand.
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Old 07-18-2014, 11:08 PM
Status: "Gone hunting until December!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
10,945 posts, read 14,584,566 times
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When I lived in WV we made our own. My neighbors and friends would butcher anywhere from 8-12 hogs a year and we had 3 big iron kettles going. One for Ponhaus (scrapple), one for lard, and one for water to wash.

Ponhaus is fantastic to make. You take all the bones with meat still on it, cleaned liver, kidneys, tongue, jowl meat etc and boil it down in a little water until meat falls off the bone. Then you remove all contents from the kettle to a large table, and everyone picks all the bones and cartilage out, leaving all product on the table.

Then you run all of this product through a grinder and back into the pot with the broth. Boil, add cornmeal, pepper and a little salt until it just pulls from the sides. Pour into molds and let sit overnight.

All of the kids, and I mean ALL of them, would gather around that iron kettle and eat the scraps out of the pot!

It tasted NOTHING like rappa brand. It's excellent sliced thin, lightly fried and served on toast. It's like a Braunschweiger / cornmeal bonanza. That is one of the thing I miss about 'home'. You cannot find good Ponhaus in Montana. If I want any I'll have to get a small kettle and make it myself.
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Old 07-19-2014, 09:09 AM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,821,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
When I lived in WV we made our own. My neighbors and friends would butcher anywhere from 8-12 hogs a year and we had 3 big iron kettles going. One for Ponhaus (scrapple), one for lard, and one for water to wash.

Ponhaus is fantastic to make. You take all the bones with meat still on it, cleaned liver, kidneys, tongue, jowl meat etc and boil it down in a little water until meat falls off the bone. Then you remove all contents from the kettle to a large table, and everyone picks all the bones and cartilage out, leaving all product on the table.

Then you run all of this product through a grinder and back into the pot with the broth. Boil, add cornmeal, pepper and a little salt until it just pulls from the sides. Pour into molds and let sit overnight.


Panhaus, scrapple and goetta are similar products but they are different. They are similar in that they are all produced during the butchering process. They are different as they use different grains. Scrapple uses buckwheat, panhaus uses cornmeal, and goetta uses pin oats and occasionally some beef products.

My in-laws used to make panhaus but it has been a couple of generations as it has been 40 years since they have kept hogs. Certain members of my family still make goetta but from higher quality cuts which kind of defeats the purpose of the product.
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Old 07-21-2014, 08:32 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
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I've never been a fan. I don't think it's gross, just fatty and bland.
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