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Old 02-28-2014, 06:37 PM
 
2,222 posts, read 4,402,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
But my housemate is from Ohio. I am constantly being confronted with casseroles involving things like cans of soup and mayonaise and tuna. Is this an Ohio thing? A broader regional Midwestern thing? The tater tot casserole had its charms, I will give you that, but the tuna stuffed shells covered in a mayonnaise-based sauce TOTALLY grossed me out.
That sounds like the food a lot of moms made when I was a little kid in the 1950s! I don't blame you for balking - it was all I could do to force that stuff down. I've lived on the West Coast for almost 30 years now and haven't encountered anyone who cooks like that here, but maybe it's still common in some areas.
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:43 PM
 
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To this day I don't know what grits are, they are American.

They sound disgusting.
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,150,314 times
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The biggest one for Indiana is breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I ate them a lot growing up. They served them at school every Monday and also at just about any kind of fair. My mom made them a lot as well.

The pork is pounded pretty thin before being breaded and fried. Served on a hamburger bun usually with yellow mustard, pickles, red onion slices, lettuce, and tomato. Sometimes mayonnaise as well. Like this except flatter.



Fried morel mushroom sandwiches are really popular as well. I couldn't find any pictures on google but it's just battered and fried morels with white bread. Some people butter the bread.

Paw paw ice cream and persimmon pudding too.

Corn dogs were in invented in Indiana but they're pretty universal now.
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:46 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 14,724,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
To this day I don't know what grits are, they are American.

They sound disgusting.
Grits are actually pretty good, with runny fried egg and hot sauce.

Grits - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Similar to Italian polenta.
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,302,589 times
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I lived in Ohio for 27 years and never heard of slum gully. Sounds like camper's stew on steroids.

Love grits. Hate polenta. They're really not the same thing, though. Not even close.
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Living near our Nation's Capitol since 2010
2,144 posts, read 2,803,179 times
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Oh my gosh, the photo of the pork tenderloin sandwich brought back so many memories. I am from Northern IN and they were standard fare at most mom and pop restaurants. We also had them with milk shakes and french fries.

I haven t had one in 30 years...wonder if they still are popular.
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Old 02-28-2014, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Currently living in Reddit
5,655 posts, read 5,463,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
I love haggis and anchovies and grilled octopus and some other "weird" foods so to each his own!
I'll eat haggis in Scotland, but not here in US.

What's funny is listening to someone who eats and enjoys scrapple talking about how haggis is "gross".

We didn't have any "weird" regional foods growing up in CT, unless you consider a white clam pizza "weird". But here in Pittsburgh, they do like chipped ham (Isaly's), which to me just tastes like razor-thin ham mixed with a pound of salt. And while I enjoy pierogi, I don't really get the concept of one white starch (potato) wrapped in another white starch (pierogi dough). Yes, I know there are other kinds of fillings, but potato is the mainstay.

And since the Federal govt can't seem to do anything anymore, I've decided I'm going to become a one-issue voter. Whichever presidential candidate promises to institute a Federal law that makes it an offense to call that imitation bolognese sauce that Skyline calls "chili" will get my vote.
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Old 02-28-2014, 08:48 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 14,724,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskink View Post
I'll eat haggis in Scotland, but not here in US.

What's funny is listening to someone who eats and enjoys scrapple talking about how haggis is "gross".

We didn't have any "weird" regional foods growing up in CT, unless you consider a white clam pizza "weird". But here in Pittsburgh, they do like chipped ham (Isaly's), which to me just tastes like razor-thin ham mixed with a pound of salt. And while I enjoy pierogi, I don't really get the concept of one white starch (potato) wrapped in another white starch (pierogi dough). Yes, I know there are other kinds of fillings, but potato is the mainstay.

And since the Federal govt can't seem to do anything anymore, I've decided I'm going to become a one-issue voter. Whichever presidential candidate promises to institute a Federal law that makes it an offense to call that imitation bolognese sauce that Skyline calls "chili" will get my vote.
Ha!
Fresh haggis is a beautiful thing. I spent years living in Scotland. I've never had scrapple but I'd probably like it too.

And I'll likewise throw in my vote for the first legislator that vows to ban "fat free" half and half, since that isn't even a THING! Half and half being half cream and half whole milk. Not some fat free abomination.

/rant.

Oh, and white clam pizza sounds delicious.
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Old 02-28-2014, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
To this day I don't know what grits are, they are American.

They sound disgusting.
They're essentially the same thing as polenta. They're a porridge made of ground corn (in polenta, the grind is a little different, and the porridge is sometimes chilled, sliced, and fried...grits can be prepared that way as well, and are usually referred to as "fried mush" when they are). If you find corn and cornmeal products disgusting, or have texture issues, you might find grits disgusting. Personally, I will generally chose polenta over pasta in Italian dishes. I tend to prefer to corn to wheat, as grains go.

Here's the breakdown of cornmeal, grits, and polenta.

Cornmeal vs. Grits vs. Polenta
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Old 02-28-2014, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
Reputation: 48613
Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneOnegin View Post
The biggest one for Indiana is breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I ate them a lot growing up. They served them at school every Monday and also at just about any kind of fair. My mom made them a lot as well.

The pork is pounded pretty thin before being breaded and fried. Served on a hamburger bun usually with yellow mustard, pickles, red onion slices, lettuce, and tomato. Sometimes mayonnaise as well. Like this except flatter.
Breaded pork tenderloins were a common Illinois staple growing up, and popular in Iowa, too. They're pretty popular anyplace that has a big pork production industry. I love them. My hometown diner is locally known for its "jumbo porky," pounded flat about 2-3 times the circumference of the roll. People either nibble around the edges, or cut the breaded cutlet in half or thirds and make a double or triple decker. Delish. I like them with a crisp leaf of iceberg, white onion slice, tomato, pickle, and yellow mustard. I love mayo, but just never put it on a pork.
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