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Old 03-02-2014, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Alaska
4,946 posts, read 4,337,286 times
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Quote:
Grits refers to a ground-corn food of Native American origin, that is common in the Southern United States and eaten mainly at breakfast. Modern grits are commonly made of alkali-treated corn known as hominy.
Grits - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-02-2014, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
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It's really cold and rainy outside right now...Grits actually sound kind of good Or some gumbo or jambalaya!
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Old 03-02-2014, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,164 posts, read 57,288,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by love roses View Post
Actually, I was just watching Create on PBS and the show I was watching said they were. Well, Polenta and Grits. The only difference was in how the corn was processed and maybe the variety of corn used.
So, there you go; grits and corn meal mush (or polenta, if you must) are both made of corn, but they're not the same food.
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Old 03-02-2014, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,150,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
I moved to SE Michigan about 14 years ago and encountered the term "coney" as in "coney restaurant" or "hot dog topped with chili." Not the same as a simple chili dog - there are regional variations and emotions can run high over which version is the best. (I'm not a fan, but it's sort of a thing around here.) Flint-style is dry with a Koegel brand sausage; Detroit style is "wet" and spicier.
The Coney Island hot dogs here are the same as the chili dogs I grew up eating in Indiana. Chili with no beans, onions, and yellow mustard.

I was really surprised and a little mind boggled at all the "Coney Island" restaurants when I moved here though. There is practically one on every block. I was looking at Yelp one day and there were about 20 different Coney Island restaurants within 3 or 4 miles of me. It's pretty weird.
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Old 03-02-2014, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,087 posts, read 11,517,515 times
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On the east coast.......seal flipper pie.
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Old 03-03-2014, 08:35 AM
 
13,008 posts, read 12,440,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
One thing that thus far in my decades I have seen to be a truly regional variant is a specialty of a particular group of Italians that settled in what was originally a mineral mining community near where I grew up in the Midwest. They brought with them many Italian and Italian American dishes one would presume to be standard, but also the inaccurately monikered "Ravs and Broth," which currently persists and can be ordered at any of the family-owned Italian restaurants in town. It's not anything I've ever seen or would expect to see in Italian restaurants elsewhere. I don't know if it is a dish that came with them or if it was developed locally, but I've only encountered it locally. Everyone's mom makes it, everyone in the community grew up with it, and people who move away miss it being available at restaurants.

It's nothing fancy, it's simply tortellini and a mirepoix simmered in a lightly seasoned chicken broth. Essentially, a homey chicken noodle soup made with tortellini vs. egg noodles. The weird thing is that literally EVERYplace calls it "ravs and broth," and I have never even once known it to contain ravioli...it is ALWAYS tortellini. Still, always referred to as "ravs and broth." "Hey, what do you put in your ravs and broth?" "Oh, I go heavy on the celery and usually use cheese tortelllini and lots of black pepper, how about you?" Seriously, a dish everyone calls "ravs, " but that everyone acknowledges is made with tortellini, never ravioli. Bizarre.
I wonder if it was simply that now people use store-bought or mass-produced tortellini (they are better in soup than ravioli) whereas when people were making their own pasta, ravioli was much simpler to make en masse.

I have frozen homemade lemon spinach tortellini soup in my fridge right now. Chicken broth, egg, tortellini, spinach and lemon juice, mainly. Turned out pretty good.
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Old 03-03-2014, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
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Don't know, but it could be...as far back as anybody can remember, it's always been a tortellini soup.

I like it fine, am not a fanatic like some people from the area are. Pasta in soup is hit and miss for me, because it gets waterlogged so easily. I'm a very al dente person if I'm eating pasta. But it's very strongly associated within a particular community where I grew up.
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Old 03-03-2014, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,415 posts, read 10,035,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskink View Post
All one needs to know is that it's not chili
from Wikipedia:
Quote:
Chili con carne (“chili with meat”), more commonly known in American English as simply “chili”, is a spicy stew containing chili peppers, meat (usually beef), tomatoes and often beans. Other seasonings may include garlic, onions, and cumin. Variations, both geographic and personal, may involve different types of meat, as well as a variety of other ingredients.
Sounds like it fits the description to me. And from a non-Ohioan ... I loved it. There are many different varieties of chili ... just because it's not one to your taste doesn't mean it's not chili.
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Old 03-04-2014, 05:50 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,531 posts, read 42,708,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fleetiebelle View Post
I've never had scrapple, but I did grow up eating goetta. I know people make it, but that's never seemed appealing to me. I'll just wait until I visit the folks.
My daughter married a Blue Ash, OH, boy, so had to learn to make goetta. I have made it a few times, and we really like it now, too. It is kind of a pain to make, but I freeze it in portion sizes and then take it out as needed. It's hearty and filling.
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Old 03-04-2014, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
21,464 posts, read 22,698,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
My daughter married a Blue Ash, OH, boy, so had to learn to make goetta. I have made it a few times, and we really like it now, too. It is kind of a pain to make, but I freeze it in portion sizes and then take it out as needed. It's hearty and filling.
OMG, I am from Blue Ash, too!
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