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Old 03-04-2014, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,172 posts, read 57,317,340 times
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I never learned to like goetta, but I love to go to the Goetta Festival!
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:06 AM
 
704 posts, read 402,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
For cereals, besides cornmeal with butter and milk, and oatmeal with brown sugar, we would have shredded wheat served HOT. You pour hot water over the shredded wheat in a strainer to soften and warm it and then you add warm milk, butter, and sugar. OMG-good!
My comfort food when I'm sick, a hot shredded wheat biscuit with butter and a fried egg on top.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:24 AM
 
2,692 posts, read 1,772,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
Ok, so I'm from Jersey. The end all and be all of weird foods from Jersey has got to be pork roll. Who knows what's in it? Moreover who actually WANTS to know what's in it. But yeah, I think it tastes pretty great. It's like the bastard cousin of bologna or something, but it has to be cooked, and if you grill it... Yum.

A close friend who is a middle-aged Jewish woman from Long Island (so had limited experience with pork, let alone pork roll) loves to tell the story of days into her marriage to her non-Jewish husband she decided to make him a sandwich. Because pork roll strongly resembled bologna, she simply slapped it on some sliced bread raw with a little mayo and served it to him, only to be met with absolute horror. Because really, the thought of eating raw pork roll is not to be contemplated.

And I don't know if it's regional, but my cousin's husband makes something that is perfectly horrendous that he calls "Chili Mac" - kraft mac n cheese and Hormel chili mixed together. When you're really drunk (emphasis on the "really" part), it actually seems pretty awesome.

But my housemate is from Ohio. I am constantly being confronted with casseroles involving things like cans of soup and mayonaise and tuna. Is this an Ohio thing? A broader regional Midwestern thing? The tater tot casserole had its charms, I will give you that, but the tuna stuffed shells covered in a mayonnaise-based sauce TOTALLY grossed me out.

And this weekend she's bent on making something that she refers to as "slum gulley." Should I be alarmed?

In any case, what are the regional dishes that have freaked you out when you encountered them and how did you encounter them?

I don't know how 'regional' this is, but I've eaten thousand-year-old eggs. Once.

Balut is regional. I've heard of it, but there isn't enough money in the world to get me to eat one.

No, thanks.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:24 AM
 
704 posts, read 402,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Breaded pork tenderloins were a common Illinois staple growing up, and popular in Iowa, too. They're pretty popular anyplace that has a big pork production industry. I love them. My hometown diner is locally known for its "jumbo porky," pounded flat about 2-3 times the circumference of the roll. People either nibble around the edges, or cut the breaded cutlet in half or thirds and make a double or triple decker. Delish. I like them with a crisp leaf of iceberg, white onion slice, tomato, pickle, and yellow mustard. I love mayo, but just never put it on a pork.
My mom grew up on them. She mentioned once that she hadn't had one since she was a child, so I made them for her. Hubby loved it. Need to add that to the dinner rotation soon.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,964 posts, read 32,696,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Cornmeal and grits are not the same thing, and, as you've just discovered, regional customs vary.
I haven't "just discovered" that regional customs vary - or for that matter, individual customs. Grits are primarily a southern dish and are not traditionally served with sugar. Of course, I am sure some people do eat them with sugar - for that matter, some people probably squirt ketchup in their grits. I'm speaking generally though. Generally, grits are a southern food served salty, not sweet.

I have no idea how people in other regions may eat cornmeal as a cereal. I'm specifically talking about grits.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,999 posts, read 17,159,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Do you eat the cornmeal with butter and milk and SUGAR? A southerner would never put sugar on grits. They are served with salt and pepper and butter - and often cheese. BUT NO SUGAR.
No, not sugar. In New England we ate/eat cornmeal with butter and milk but it was in a bowl like cereal. My southern friend put it on a plate with butter and she was wondering if I would eat it. hahaha. It was just like what we ate for cereal with milk and butter. Yellow corn meal. I read somewhere that in the south they use white corn meal and in the north we use yellow corn meal. My southern friend used yellow.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,964 posts, read 32,696,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poopycat View Post
I'm not a southerner and I have only eaten grits a couple of times. Since I'm not a southerner, I can say without shame that my favorite way to eat grits is with maple syrup on them! Grits are like a cereal to me, and I like my cereals sweet.

Hmmm...I bet they would be good with brown sugar too...

Again, not a southerner, so "tsk tsk" me all you want
Have at it.

I love cream of wheat with sugar and butter and milk, and cream of wheat would probably be pretty good with brown sugar or maple syrup. But I can't stomach grits with sugar.

You really should try them with salt and pepper and a sprinkling of cheese in them, alongside some bacon and eggs, if you haven't already. YUM!
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,964 posts, read 32,696,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
LOL! I actually did a search of this thread for the word "cheeks," as in beef cheeks aka barbacoa! I wondered if anyone else posted this.

Well, if you didn't grow up eating beef cheeks, let me tell you from someone who didn't - YUCK! Slimy weirdness! I just tried cooking some, as I'd heard it was good... nasty consistency. Couldn't do it.

My dog, however, loved them. LOL!
I have never cooked them, but I do know that if they are cooked correctly, they are not slimy. They are very tender with a touch of sweetness to them.

I will let someone else cook them and I'll just stick to eating them!
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,964 posts, read 32,696,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
No, not sugar. In New England we ate/eat cornmeal with butter and milk but it was in a bowl like cereal. My southern friend put it on a plate with butter and she was wondering if I would eat it. hahaha. It was just like what we ate for cereal with milk and butter. Yellow corn meal. I read somewhere that in the south they use white corn meal and in the north we use yellow corn meal. My southern friend used yellow.
Grits differ in consistency from cornmeal. Not sure what your friend was using. Grits have a bit more substance to them and are grainier than cornmeal.

In the south, both yellow and white cornmeal are used to make cornbread. I generally use yellow just because I like the color, but my grandmother nearly always used white to make her famous fried "hot water cornbread" - it turned out golden because it was fried.

OK, that's a regional food - anyone else had hot water cornbread? YUM! Fattening though. It's especially good with turnip greens and black eyed peas and a slice or two of ham. My dad likes to tear up a piece of hot water cornbread and put it in a glass of cold milk and eat it for a late night snack.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,818 posts, read 39,375,570 times
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I don't know if it's hot water cornbread (have never heard it referred to as such, but it could be a regional thing), but my grandma, an Alabama native, ONLY makes savory cornbread, and typically from white cornmeal, made in a cast iron skillet. It is always served as an accompaniment to savory dishes like the ham, peas, and greens you mentioned, and is the chief ingredient in her savory onion, sage, and cornbread dressing. I was probably a teenager the first time I had cornbread that wasn't made the way my mom and grandma make it, and it was made from Jiffy Corn Muffin mix or similar, and I almost choked, because in NO world was I expecting cornbread to be sweet. Sweet cornbread, such is is so much more common up north, where I live, isn't bad, it's just not cornbread to me. It's more like cake.
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