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Old 03-09-2014, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,087 posts, read 11,524,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warren zee
The worst thing that I can think of from Brooklyn NY is fried Calamari.

It looks like fried onion rings. Don't be fooled. It's an octopus. Deep fried and served in rings. Sometimes you will get a tentacle or a bunch of little suction cups in your mouth.

They look like onion rings. But they aren't.

Sold and served all over NY and LI. Gross.

Also in NY/NJ among Jewish people (I'm Jewish so don't complain to me) gefilte fish. Served at Passover. It's like a tiny fishy loaf. I grew up with it and I can eat it. But it's not something to try after age nine.
I adore calamari. Not every restaurant can cook it properly.
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Old 03-09-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,487 posts, read 13,349,016 times
Reputation: 19916
Corn meal mush= yellow, finely textured, usually served sweet, similar to cream of wheat or malt-o-meal. Also excellent when chilled, sliced, and fried.
Grits= white, coarser texture, usually served savory not sweet
Hominy= nasty, as much as I love grits I cannot eat hominy
Polenta=? everybody seems to define it differently, but it sounds like corn meal mush to me.

I love cornbread, sweet or not, and have the habit of eating cold cornbread crumbled with milk and sugar. I've also had cornbread made with creamed corn and it's right tasty, tho I don't know as I'd like it with milk and sugar, lol.

Pasties and peirogies are two of my favorite regional foods , yummy.
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Old 03-09-2014, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,139,663 times
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We went to a Mexican restaurant yesterday that seemed quite authentic because they served tongue and pork tacos with cilantro, onion, and a lime wedge and also served "fruit water." We ordered our meal and I couldn't wait to try their chips and salsa.

The waitress arrived at the table with a large basket of pasta para duros - those fried wagon-wheel thingies. What a let-down - I can't stand those things. Some people also call those "chicharrones" but they don't contain any meat product whatsoever.
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Old 03-10-2014, 12:14 AM
 
6,124 posts, read 5,152,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrannyBear View Post
Some Western Pennsylvania specialities include fried baloney sandwiches -- ate a million of those for lunch -- as well as chipped ham barbecue. Basically it is made wtih Isaly's brand super thinly chipped/chopped ham and a homemade barbecue sauce of ketchup, vinegar, brown sugar, onion and chopped pickle. Has to be served on very soft bakery sandwich buns. We also had "city chicken" which is not chicken at all but a skewer of pork and veal cubes, breaded and either pan fried or oven fried. They were very yummy. Pierogis are also very popular in Pittsburgh and are served with sauteed onions and sour cream. Kielbasa cooked with sauerkraut -- we sweetened our sauerkraut with thinly sliced apples , onions and a little bt of brown sugar -- put it in the oven and bake until super soft. Primanti's sandwiches -- they have now gone to other locations but basically a big Pittsburgh sandwich with coleslaw and french fries ON the sandwich -- that originated in Pittsburgh no matter what anyone else says -- it is ours. Hungarian nut roll -- really a delicious pastry filled with sweetened ground walnuts -- also poppy seed roll. Paczki -- Polish style donuts with various fillings -- you see them mostly for Fat Tuesday -- right before Lent. Homemade Ukranian mushroom soup. Ladylocks -- little crusty tubes of pastry filled with cream. For Thanksgiving we have mashed potato, onion and bread stuffing -- think it is an Irish recipe. And finally the SMILEY COOKIES from Eat 'N Park. That's all I can remember right now but I love all of it.


I'm a transplant to Western PA, and I LOVE ham BBQ made with Isaly's chipped chopped ham. Our little borough had an Isaly's downtown, but it closed years ago. The nut roll you described is Kalachi - tried that for the first time too. Dee-lish. I don't like the kind made with apricot, though.

LOVE the salads. They put steakums and fries on top. By the time you chomp through the good stuff, though, you don't have much room for the greens.

I'm from Berks County, PA originally, and grew up eating scrapple (yuck), "schnitz und gnepp" (dried apples and dumplings cooked in ham broth), tons of home cured sausage, stuffed pig stomach, shoefly pie, funny cake (a delicious chocolate shoe fly), lemon sponge pie (a cholesterol nightmare but worth it), "ham and string beans" (a pot of green beans and potatoes boiled to mush with a ham bone), "turnips" (turnips and potatoes boiled to mush with a beef bone). "cabbage" (cabbage and potatoes boiled to mush with a beef or ham bone).
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Old 03-10-2014, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,818 posts, read 39,375,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
We went to a Mexican restaurant yesterday that seemed quite authentic because they served tongue and pork tacos with cilantro, onion, and a lime wedge and also served "fruit water." We ordered our meal and I couldn't wait to try their chips and salsa.

The waitress arrived at the table with a large basket of pasta para duros - those fried wagon-wheel thingies. What a let-down - I can't stand those things. Some people also call those "chicharrones" but they don't contain any meat product whatsoever.
Oh, I love duros! I had students I tutored whose father ran a Mexican bakery, and in addition to baked goods, he made them as well. The kids would always bring them for me. I like the wagon wheel shaped ones, but not the square ones, which are usually thicker.

At the laundromat in my heavily Hispanic neighborhood, there is also a guy who sells bags of them, fresh-made, from a rolling cart, and people snack on them while waiting for their laundry to dry. Most people shake hot sauce and sal con limon on them.
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Old 03-10-2014, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,818 posts, read 39,375,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Skeffington View Post
The nut roll you described is Kalachi - tried that for the first time too. Dee-lish. I don't like the kind made with apricot, though. .
It's also essentially the same thing as povitica, the Slovenian and Croatian version, which is a popular (if expensive and labor-intensive) treat where my husband's family is from (Strawberry Hill neighborhood, Kansas City, Kansas - very multiethnic neighborhood, but heavily Slavic in its original settlement). Most Eastern European nut rolls are pretty much the same basic thing with small regional variations on filling, whether they are called pastic, kalac, potica, povitica, whatever.
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Old 03-10-2014, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Ridley Park, PA
695 posts, read 1,230,198 times
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Not that I've ever eaten it, but scrapple is a big Delaware food. I believe the sole episode of Dirty Jobs that was filmed in Delaware was of a scrapple plant south of Dover, in Felton.
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Old 03-10-2014, 01:27 PM
 
3,322 posts, read 3,565,728 times
Reputation: 4125
Wisconsin = brats. Not weird though. What WAS weird was the way our daughter's Long Island born and raised boyfriend pronounced it, like the description of a spoiled child!
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Old 03-10-2014, 05:41 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 34,989,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
Shout out to Vegemite for us Aussies!
Oh God, that reminds me: MARMITE. Yuck yuck yuck.
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Old 03-10-2014, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,818 posts, read 39,375,570 times
Reputation: 48613
I love Marmite...not so much Vegemite, though.
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