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Old 03-10-2014, 09:11 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,813 posts, read 4,310,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
I adore calamari. Not every restaurant can cook it properly.
Calamari is squid--not octopus.
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Old 03-13-2014, 01:20 AM
 
6,122 posts, read 5,147,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by campion View Post
Not that I've ever eaten it, but scrapple is a big Delaware food. I believe the sole episode of Dirty Jobs that was filmed in Delaware was of a scrapple plant south of Dover, in Felton.
I grew up in Berks County, PA, and we were cursed with scrapple at our house every winter. I was forced to choke it down for breakfast (blecccch) because we were told we needed something to "stick to our ribs" in the winter. My grandmother lived with us, and her mindset was stuck in the 1930's I guess. We didn't milk cows before school or walk a mile to a coal heated one room school house - this was the late 60's/early 70's, we lived in the suburbs, had a ten munute walk, had overheated classrooms and a hot cafeteria lunch at noon. (My brothers were forced to wear long underwear, too, and roasted all day in that overheated school, but that's another story).

Often, to my horror, the disgusting scrapple would reappear again that night on the supper table. And always apple sauce right there next to the scrapple. I hate/hated applesauce, too.

To this day, when I go back home to visit, my mother will always say, "There's scrapple in the refrigerator" when she sees me frying bacon, and she's still pushing the applesauce. She'll say, "Don't you want applesauce?" Bless her heart, she means well, but she forgets how much I hate it.

Last edited by Mrs. Skeffington; 03-13-2014 at 01:31 AM..
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Old 03-13-2014, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 22,613,697 times
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I don't know how common it is anymore, but when I got to LA in the 70s many of the little lunch counters and corner restaurants had a dish on the menu called a "chili size." Basically it was an open faced hamburger sandwich in a bowl, with a ladle of chili poured over it, then topped with chopped onions and grated cheese. You needed a knife and fork to eat it. It was invented in the 20s by a local legend known as Ptomaine Tommy, then copied by everyone else in town. It got the funny name "chili size" because there were originally two sizes, but only one was popular, and it was the "chili size."By the time I got there, you could order it just by asking for a "size."

Last edited by OpenD; 03-13-2014 at 06:59 AM..
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Old 03-13-2014, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Volcano
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Hawai'i has lots of beloved regional dishes that hit visitors as "weird."

Hilo is home to the Loco Moco, invented right after WWII at the Lincoln Grill, and now found throughout the islands, as well as at Hawaiian themed restaurants like L&L Barbecue across the mainland.

A bunch of high school runners used to congregate at Lincoln Grill after practice and they were always hungry and never had much money, so the cook came up with a special just for them... a bowl of rice, topped with a hamburger patty, and a ladle of brown gravy over that, and topped with a fried egg. It was cheap, tasty and filling, and soon was being copied by others. It was named for one of the runners, called Loco, and then Moco was added to rhyme. It's classic Hawaiian soul food, along with spam musubi, saimin, lau lau, manapua and more...
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Old 03-13-2014, 08:48 AM
 
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Loco moco and size sound nom!
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Old 03-13-2014, 09:10 AM
 
3,321 posts, read 3,562,039 times
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I don't understand the aversion to scrapple. I like it! And, isn't it just pork sausage and corn meal? Or did my mother in law just tell me that's all that was in it when she fed it to me..
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Old 03-13-2014, 10:27 AM
 
703 posts, read 402,112 times
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Love scrapple. No one in North Idaho has ever heard of it. Did have it shipped out here once, from Habbersett. A $30.00 order (6 - 1 lb packages of scrapple) totaled $108.73 after shipping. I could almost fly to Pa and bring some home for that! LOL
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Old 03-13-2014, 11:05 AM
 
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It can't be that difficult to make.

I once made goetta (sp?). My only regret was not cutting the onions a little finer.
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Old 03-13-2014, 11:30 AM
 
703 posts, read 402,112 times
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Once I got it in my mind, I had to have it. Ordered 8 lbs of Habbersett from Amazon for *only* $67.00!
Better taste every darn bit as good as I remember it! LOL
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Old 03-13-2014, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,885 posts, read 32,642,286 times
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Not sure how regional this is so I'd love to hear from anyone else who's familiar with this.

At just about any outdoor event, from sporting events to flea markets, we have food trucks that specialize in roasted corn. It's so delicious! It's roasted over an open flame, and then when you order one, they pull back the husk, dip it in melted butter, and then you have a wide selection of what you'd like to put on it - from parmesan cheese to jalepenos, chili powder, Tony Chachere's cajun seasoning, mayonnaise, lemon pepper, sea salt, Lawry's seasoned salt, BBQ flavoring, curry, just about anything you can think of.

YUM. My favorite combo is parmesan cheese and Tony's, with a sprinkling of chili powder. And by the way, you would be surprised to find how good it is with a squirt of mayo on it (spread around) but I don't do that often because my gosh, it's already been dipped in butter...
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