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Old 03-13-2014, 12:47 PM
 
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We have that here in the east coast, too. The lines get really lonnnng when it's roasted corn season!
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Old 03-13-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Oh, oh, oh, I thought of another one that's common in Gulf Coast states - BOILED PEANUTS!

I LOVE boiled peanuts - if they're freshly boiled, steaming hot, served up in a lunch sized paper bag. YUM. So salty and juicy and delicious!
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Old 03-13-2014, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Oh, oh, oh, I thought of another one that's common in Gulf Coast states - BOILED PEANUTS!

I LOVE boiled peanuts - if they're freshly boiled, steaming hot, served up in a lunch sized paper bag. YUM. So salty and juicy and delicious!
I make boiled peanuts in a crock pot. I buy a sack of raw peanuts, toss them in the crock pot with water, salt, and Louisiana Hot Sauce then let them cook overnight. The family loves them.
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Old 03-13-2014, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
I make boiled peanuts in a crock pot. I buy a sack of raw peanuts, toss them in the crock pot with water, salt, and Louisiana Hot Sauce then let them cook overnight. The family loves them.
I may have to try this - thanks! Living in northeast Texas, boiled peanuts on the roadside are a rarity, unlike my twelve years of childhood and young adulthood that I spent in Georgia and Alabama.
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Old 03-13-2014, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
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I never heard of boiled peanuts. Do you boil them in the shell?
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Volcano
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Originally Posted by mrs.cool View Post
I don't understand the aversion to scrapple. I like it! And, isn't it just pork sausage and corn meal? Or did my mother in law just tell me that's all that was in it when she fed it to me..
It's interesting to me how different cultures have variations on this simple and thrifty dish of meat scraps and grain or meal of some kind, tracing back to the Roman Era. It's a versatile recipe for a great budget stretcher!

Scrapple is pork and corn meal, or more traditionally, buckwheat meal, a Pennsylvania Dutch classic. Cincinatti folks of German descent have their Goetta (pronounced gedda) which is ground meat with steel-cut oats. In Scotland white pudding is meat scraps and oatmeal. In Ireland white pudding is also made, and by adding blood to the mash it becomes black pudding, a slice or two of which turn up fried in a traditional "full English" cooked breakfast "fry up."

My Canadian grandmother, of hearty Scottish stock, made "Mealy Pudding," with beef suet and onions and oatmeal and scraps of meat from my grandfather's butcher shop. And of course the Acadians made their historic migration from Eastern Canada to Louisiana, where their name got shortened to Cajuns, and they have their beloved boudin, which is basically rice and meat scraps.

Lots of variations on a tasty theme.

Last edited by OpenD; 03-13-2014 at 03:16 PM..
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
I never heard of boiled peanuts. Do you boil them in the shell?
Yep - just toss the whole lot in salted, seasoned water and simmer overnight.

I start the batch by setting the crock pot on high and cook for about an hour after it comes to temperature, then I set it to low and let them cook overnight.
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
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Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Yep - just toss the whole lot in salted, seasoned water and simmer overnight.

I start the batch by setting the crock pot on high and cook for about an hour after it comes to temperature, then I set it to low and let them cook overnight.
Do they taste the same as roasted peanuts?
I guess the shell becomes really soft from the boiling? Do you peel them as opposed to cracking them open?
Sorry for all the questions. It's a really alien concept.
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
Do they taste the same as roasted peanuts?
I guess the shell becomes really soft from the boiling? Do you peel them as opposed to cracking them open?
Sorry for all the questions. It's a really alien concept.
They taste nothing like roasted peanuts and the shell kind of pops, although some of the shells do get quite soft. I usually pop the shell in my mouth and open it with my teeth to get that salty brine with the peanuts. It's difficult to describe how they taste and the texture is also difficult to describe - there's also a fine line between "almost done" and "done."

We also have fried peanuts down here. You eat the entire peanut - shell and all.
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Old 03-13-2014, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
I never heard of boiled peanuts. Do you boil them in the shell?
Yes, you do. I think they are delicious, but some people are adamant that they are an acquired taste.

In the South, you can often find roadside stands that have this huge pot hanging over a fire, with peanuts boiling away in salted water. You can buy them by the lunch bag full. Often they will have several flavors - most commonly plain (just salted, which is plenty good anyway) or Cajun (spicier and also good).

They dip them out of the big pot, drain them, and put them in the lunch bag (occasionally a plastic baggie but I much prefer the paper lunch bag method) and hand them to you while they're steaming hot.

You pop them into your mouth one at a time and sort of pop the shell open with your teeth. When you do, yummy salted/flavored water squirts out (just a little). The peanut is still intact but it has the consistency of a red bean that's been cooked.

YOu actually need two bags - one to put the shells in.
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