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Old 02-28-2014, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,821 posts, read 39,419,773 times
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I don't think one-dish meals (whether you call them casseroles, hot dish - lookin' at you, Minnesotans-, or "bakes") are particularly regional, although certain types may be associated more with particular regions. The "just add a can of Campbell's Cream of Whatever condensed soup, it's a recipe starter!" type recipes seem to have their origins in the era of moms shifting back into the workforce after decades of being homemakers...a response to the whole, "trying to be the homemade dinners mom AND the working mom balancing act" thing. The "just add Cream of Mushroom Soup!" recipes seem to have hit peak popularity in the 70s and 80s (at least, they make plenty of appearances in my mom's recipe books of that era), but I don't know if they're super associated with any one region.

I'm guessing that Jewish moms in Scarsdale have been making creamy baking dishes of kugel as long as Iowa farm moms have been bringing cheesy corn casserole with a crunchy Ritz cracker crust to the church basement brunch, if not longer.

There are regional foods, here, but I don't think any of them are especially odd.
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Old 02-28-2014, 01:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
The casseroles involving cans of soup and mayo are not specific to Ohio. I think they are more specific to the post war period - 50s 60s and 70s.

Like tuna noodle casserole and green bean casserole. People on Long Island, where I grew up, still eat those occasionally. Especially on the green bean casserole on holidays.

Since moving to Ohio, I think I have noticed that other casseroles are eaten more frequently than in the NY metro area. But I noticed that in PA also.

Ohio foods that are not weird but specific to Ohio (my region of NE Ohio, anyway) include - Hot peppers in oil - these can be put on almost anything from a sandwich to eggs. When we first stayed at a hotel out here, I noticed them on the table along with salt and black peppers.

Now they are in my refrigerator at all times. Love them!

Candy called a "Buckeye". Ohio is the Buckeye state and these are popular here. Taste like a Reeses peanut butter cups, but better.
Green bean casserole is nationwide - we had it at every holiday And we definitely ate casseroles when I was a kid, but wow, some of the stuff the roommate produces is a little out there for me. She claims it's Midwest-style cooking, and I'm not in a position to argue.

Hot peppers in oil sound awesome though, and yes, I too have tasted the wonder that is buckeyes!
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:01 PM
 
13,022 posts, read 12,469,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I don't think one-dish meals (whether you call them casseroles, hot dish - lookin' at you, Minnesotans-, or "bakes") are particularly regional, although certain types may be associated more with particular regions. The "just add a can of Campbell's Cream of Whatever condensed soup, it's a recipe starter!" type recipes seem to have their origins in the era of moms shifting back into the workforce after decades of being homemakers...a response to the whole, "trying to be the homemade dinners mom AND the working mom balancing act" thing. The "just add Cream of Mushroom Soup!" recipes seem to have hit peak popularity in the 70s and 80s (at least, they make plenty of appearances in my mom's recipe books of that era), but I don't know if they're super associated with any one region.

I'm guessing that Jewish moms in Scarsdale have been making creamy baking dishes of kugel as long as Iowa farm moms have been bringing cheesy corn casserole with a crunchy Ritz cracker crust to the church basement brunch, if not longer.

There are regional foods, here, but I don't think any of them are especially odd.
My mother had a GREAT recipe for chicken involving cream of mushroom soup that was one of my favorite foods. We had it every Christmas, and my best friend actually requested it on her deathbed, if that's not too morbid.

What prompted me to start the thread was the enthusiastic IM from my roommate announcing that she was going to be making slum gulley this weekend. It just sounds .... questionable.
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
We can buy Taylor Pork Roll all the way down here in Dixie. I thought it was a southern thing until I read your post.

I embrace all regional foods - some I like and some... well, are liked by others.
It used to be specifically a Jersey thing. People in PA and NY didn't even know what it was, and there is actually a service that will mail you Trenton Pork Roll for a fee to wherever you are in the country.

I can actually get it out here in Denver at two different restaurants, but I've never seen it in a store.
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I'm a lifelong Midwesterner, and I can't think of that many foods that are really that exclusively "midwestern" in style to the point where they're loads different than you'd get elsewhere. I suppose the loosemeat sandwich, which has Iowa roots, might be one, and obvious things like Chicago-style hot dogs and deep dish...but to be fair, those are "Chicago" things, not "Midwest" things. Likewise, Cincinnati chili, while unique, isn't a "Midwest" thing, it's a Cincinnati thing.

I think when family farms were more prevalent, there were more "delicacies" relating specifically to that that were commonplace than there are now, but those days are pretty much gone, with most of the farming being done by corporate/factory farms, and old crafts being essentially lost. But even at that rate, traditional old-time farm foods, like farmer's cheese, scrapple and headcheese, aren't intrinsically midwestern, they're just rural. And while the Midwest has/had a lot of farms, it's certainly not the only rural part of the country.
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post

What prompted me to start the thread was the enthusiastic IM from my roommate announcing that she was going to be making slum gulley this weekend. It just sounds .... questionable.
I've never heard of it, I had to look it up. From the recipe I saw, it looks like basically sloppy joe with okra, rice, and mushrooms mixed in, eaten in a bowl, not on a bun. Like a creole-tinged beanless chili/sloppy joe hybrid or something. It doesn't sound terrible, I'd just never heard of it.
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,821 posts, read 39,419,773 times
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Ah...looking up "slumgullion" or "slumgullion stew" provided more insight.

It appears to refer to either a meat stew or...a cesspool. Yup. Also slang for "something unpleasant," although not a term in the common parlance anywhere I've lived.
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:22 PM
 
13,022 posts, read 12,469,707 times
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Originally Posted by tabularasa View Post
ah...looking up "slumgullion" or "slumgullion stew" provided more insight.

It appears to refer to either a meat stew or...a cesspool. Yup. Also slang for "something unpleasant," although not a term in the common parlance anywhere i've lived.
lol
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:29 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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OK we are not from Minnesota, but have Scandinavian relatives there. I'm part Scandinavian, but I guess if you don't live among skads of people of the same ethnic group, the stranger foods die out. There are plenty of Scandinavians who settled in Brooklyn NY , but most have moved to the suburbs of NJ or Long Island now.

These Minnesota relatives made or brought a horrible fish for Christmas. I like fish now. Salmon. Herring. Talapia.

But this stuff - Lustfisjh or Lefftsfisjh (sp?) (wrong word) - This was terrible and weird. What was weirder was how much they loved it.

I wouldn't give it to a cat.
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:29 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
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Cornish pasties (aka Michigan pasties) are common here. Basically a baked meat pie with turnips.
They are not weird, but more common in Michigan than anywhere else I've spent time in (outside of the UK.)
I think they are really good. There are stores here which specialize in them.

Pasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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