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Old 02-28-2014, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,126,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
...But this stuff - Lustfisjh or Lefftsfisjh (sp?) (wrong word) - This was terrible and weird. What was weirder was how much they loved it...
Lutefisk - <ehhhhhrrrp>
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:42 PM
 
13,007 posts, read 12,434,284 times
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Pasties are divine.

Lutefisk... doesn't Garrison Keillor have stories about that?
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,334,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
OK we are not from Minnesota, but have Scandinavian relatives there. I'm part Scandinavian, but I guess if you don't live among skads of people of the same ethnic group, the stranger foods die out. There are plenty of Scandinavians who settled in Brooklyn NY , but most have moved to the suburbs of NJ or Long Island now.

These Minnesota relatives made or brought a horrible fish for Christmas. I like fish now. Salmon. Herring. Talapia.

But this stuff - Lustfisjh or Lefftsfisjh (sp?) (wrong word) - This was terrible and weird. What was weirder was how much they loved it.

I wouldn't give it to a cat.
Lutefisk. It's lye-soaked fish with a jelly-like consistency. I'm familiar with it, having gone to a Scandinavian school, but know nobody who actually eats it. But it is a traditional Christmas feast thing.
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:44 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 14,716,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Lutefisk - <ehhhhhrrrp>
I had this once, in Denmark. ehhhhhrrrp about sums it up. It's pretty nasty if you're not used to it.

Lutefisk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But then I love haggis and anchovies and grilled octopus and some other "weird" foods so to each his own!
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Old 02-28-2014, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Throop, PA
693 posts, read 746,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
It used to be specifically a Jersey thing. People in PA and NY didn't even know what it was, and there is actually a service that will mail you Trenton Pork Roll for a fee to wherever you are in the country.

I can actually get it out here in Denver at two different restaurants, but I've never seen it in a store.
I have lived in Northeastern Pennsylvania for 53 years and have enjoyed pork roll all of those years. Was always available. Scrapple was harder to find, but you could always find it somewhere locally. Today you can find both in just about every grocery store.
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Old 02-28-2014, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,126,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wadejay26 View Post
I have lived in Northeastern Pennsylvania for 53 years...
So you are probably well-aware of John Cope's Dried Sweet Corn. I purchased several packs of this because the description, given by a chef who used it, made it sound so delicious. So... ever tried it? If so, what's the best way to prepare it?
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Old 02-28-2014, 03:21 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 34,966,446 times
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Poutine.
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Old 02-28-2014, 05:27 PM
 
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I love shrimp and grits! That's a good Charleston SC dish!
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:02 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 5,363,024 times
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Gawd a pie floater.

Yes indeed.

The pie floater is a meal available in Australia, which consists of the traditional meat pie sitting, unusually inverted (upside-down), in a plate of thick green pea soup. It is traditionally served and covered with tomato sauce and, although subject to the taste of the individual consumer, mint sauce and salt and pepper are the also traditionally added to complement the dish. Another popular condiment is vinegar or even Worcestershire sauce.


The Pie Cart

You will see all sorts at the pie cart at 2am, from the Premier on down.
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Old 02-28-2014, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,334,463 times
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Shrimp and grits is a wonderful dish...it's one of the first dishes my husband, an excellent cook, impressed me with.
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