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Old 03-29-2017, 02:58 PM
 
805 posts, read 381,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cb at sea View Post
Unless I'm doing a turkey dinner, or some other "feast", I can get dinner cooked in 30-40 mins....nightly! Even without a slow-cooker or pressure cooker!
I mean I can too, but I'm wondering if there are some advantages to using this, such as less active time cooking, dirtying less pans, etc. As I mentioned in the example, if I could use this to throw some chicken in the bottom and steam some potatoes and veggies on top I would look at that as an advantage. I wouldn't have to stand in front of the skillet cooking the chicken and dirty an additional pan and steamer to cook the sides.

The reason I am most interested is convenience. I enjoy cooking on the weekend when I have time, but during the week I'm tired when I come home and it would be nice to toss everything in the pressure cooker and kick back for 20-30 minutes while it does its thing instead of being active in the kitchen.

As I said, I'm curious if this cooks things quickly that a slow cooker wouldn't.
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clawsondude View Post
I mean I can too, but I'm wondering if there are some advantages to using this, such as less active time cooking, dirtying less pans, etc. As I mentioned in the example, if I could use this to throw some chicken in the bottom and steam some potatoes and veggies on top I would look at that as an advantage. I wouldn't have to stand in front of the skillet cooking the chicken and dirty an additional pan and steamer to cook the sides.

The reason I am most interested is convenience. I enjoy cooking on the weekend when I have time, but during the week I'm tired when I come home and it would be nice to toss everything in the pressure cooker and kick back for 20-30 minutes while it does its thing instead of being active in the kitchen.

As I said, I'm curious if this cooks things quickly that a slow cooker wouldn't.
I'm buying one after I move to my new house in June. (I just don't want to buy it now and pack it.) I've done quite a bit of questioning on this machine too (see the link to the other thread that Emm74 posted; my questions started well after the thread started). The thing that I was most interested in is that you can BROWN things in the Instant Pot. So that means that you're not dirtying a pan (and obviously doing prep cooking) before putting it into the pot for the real cooking. I thought that sounded fabulous. Also, I loved that it does slow cooking (replacing my too-small crockpot) and it cooks rice (replacing my too-small rice cooker). Win-win-win.
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Old 03-29-2017, 04:50 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,356 posts, read 16,860,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I'm buying one after I move to my new house in June. (I just don't want to buy it now and pack it.) I've done quite a bit of questioning on this machine too (see the link to the other thread that Emm74 posted; my questions started well after the thread started). The thing that I was most interested in is that you can BROWN things in the Instant Pot. So that means that you're not dirtying a pan (and obviously doing prep cooking) before putting it into the pot for the real cooking. I thought that sounded fabulous. Also, I loved that it does slow cooking (replacing my too-small crockpot) and it cooks rice (replacing my too-small rice cooker). Win-win-win.
It browns really fast too.

The slow cooker feature isn't really equivalent to a crock pot because it only heats at the bottom.
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clawsondude View Post

As I said, I'm curious if this cooks things quickly that a slow cooker wouldn't.

You're question is confusing me.


It is a pressure cooker (fast)

It is a slow cooker (slow)

Cook rice/grains (fast)



If you won't use it for the fast stuff, then it isn't for you. It all depends on how you will use it.
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
It browns really fast too.

The slow cooker feature isn't really equivalent to a crock pot because it only heats at the bottom.
Sweet! So excited for the browning! I can't understand/believe that it actually browns -- I'm excited!

Can you explain "isn't really equivalent to a crock pot because it only heats at the bottom"? So let's say that I do this slow-cooked London broil thing in my crock pot. It's a chunk of beef, some mushrooms, some soup, it goes into my crock pot for 6 hours, and then it's yummy delicious. How would that work in the Instant Pot if it only heats at the bottom? Or are you telling me that I wouldn't do the beef/mushroom/soup on slow cook -- that I'd do it the "Instant Pot pressure cooker way" instead? The latter is totally fine; I just have no idea. I mean, I don't do anything in my crock pot that *has* to slow cook.

Did I mention that I'm excited?
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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Heck now I'm excited. I didn't really pay any attention that it browned.n
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
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You use the saute function to brown. You can also turn it on saute to start heating up as you assemble ingredients even if you don't want to saute. Then once you finish adding everything, turn it off, put on the lid and put it back on to pressure cook. It saves a bit of time coming to pressure that way.
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:46 PM
 
805 posts, read 381,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
You're question is confusing me.


It is a pressure cooker (fast)

It is a slow cooker (slow)

Cook rice/grains (fast)



If you won't use it for the fast stuff, then it isn't for you. It all depends on how you will use it.
I am interested in using it for the fast stuff. I'm just wondering what type of fast things people make in them.
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Old 03-29-2017, 09:03 PM
 
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The sautéing/ browning in the same pot is a big plus. I never threw raw ingredients into a slow cooker without sautéing. There is less heat in the kitchen and less aromas/smell in the house from long stovetop or slow cooker times.

I use it for yogurt because it's done in one pot for heating the milk to 180 and then incubation at a low temp for 8+ hours. I make yogurt almost weekly. You will need two silicone seals, buy an extra. One for savory/spicy foods and another for delicate/ low smell foods. The rings aren't pure silicone and retain strong smells even after going through the dishwasher. You don't want to make curry followed by yogurt using the same ring.

I use it two to three times a week for steel cut oats. I use four mugs, three on the bottom and one on top, that fit on the rack and 1/4 c sc oats with 3/4 c water in each cup. It takes 25 minutes total to come up to pressure with 6 minutes cook time and then a natural pressure release. It takes 30 minutes on the stove with stirring. I put on the Instant Pot and can do other things during that time. I get four individual servings of steel cut oats; two for us and two to go in the fridge for heating in the microwave the next morning.

I've had mine for two years and if it quit working, I would get another one right away. It's on the counter in use more than being stored in the pantry.

Last edited by jean_ji; 03-29-2017 at 09:14 PM..
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Old 03-29-2017, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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I cook beans, grains, and rice primarily.

In the past I have used other pressure cookers to make stock, and pre-cook ribs.
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