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Old 03-18-2008, 08:54 PM
 
Location: RR
225 posts, read 752,889 times
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Leg of lamb/greek style, orzo with roasted artichokes, olives, baby spinach and tom. in a lemon vingrette. Aspargus with a tahini sauce.....banana cream pie
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Old 03-19-2008, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,513,339 times
Reputation: 19858
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Moose,
Would a typical market in England sell rabbit, or would you go to a specialty market?
What is the difference between hare and rabbit?

I can't really understand the squeemishness of posters either. A rabbit is no cuter than a cow or a lamb.
The best supermarket here is called Waitrose (like a very large deli and supermarket too, excellent quality of food) and will have more unusual meats like rabbit and venison and sometimes wild boar ( in season ) but usually you would have to go to your local butcher as they will get it from local hunters and farmers. You also get Pheasant, Partridges , Quails etc... at a decent butcher.

Hare tastes a lot more gamey. It's got a beautiful flavour.

I find the squeamishness really odd. Most of the animals humans eat are cute or have the same right to life in a way.

It's a real shame because Rabbit and Hare and Game is so delicious, and good for you too. It's a lot more natural and the animals will have lived a much nicer, humane life until slaughter.
Rabbit and Game tends to be eaten mostly by people in the countryside here in the UK as people are also quite squeamish about it.

I made some Rabbit stew once for some Finnish Friends who had never had it and it became their favourite meat.
They were reluctant to begin with but the plates were mopped pretty quickly !

I was brought up eating it in France all the time , with other game so I guess it's what you are used to.
My English Fiance adores it too . I converted him after his initial suspicion.
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Old 03-19-2008, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,513,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wktully View Post
I don't think it has so much to do with the cuteness factor as it does have to do with it's a domesticated pet! Kinda like eating Rover the dog or Fluffy the kitty!
People don't really raise Rabbit for meat so the Rabbit you eat is wild , so no pets harmed I promise.

And believe me Rabbits can be really vicious creatures. A vet who is a friend of mine is constantly having to find new homes for those cute and fluffy critters who keep biting people and being aggressive. I was bitten by one once and it almost cut to the bone !
According to my friend it's about the worst pet anyone can have for their kids.
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Old 03-19-2008, 04:25 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,531 posts, read 42,694,765 times
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Ok, so hare is to rabbit, as mutton is to lamb?
My son is a hunter, so he's dragged home some odd things, but no rabbits yet. I wouldn't mind trying it though.
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Old 03-19-2008, 04:51 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,513,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Ok, so hare is to rabbit, as mutton is to lamb?
My son is a hunter, so he's dragged home some odd things, but no rabbits yet. I wouldn't mind trying it though.
The thing to remember with rabbit is that it has tendency to dry out like Chicken so if your son does catch some make sure you either cook it really quickly ( for the "fillet" part) or really slowly. It does work beautifully in slowly cooked stews. It then becomes very moist and falls off the bone.
Hare is leaner but both are very healthy and some of the lowest cholesterol of any meats.

BBC Food - Recipes
Henschke | Food And Wine › Rabbit fillet with pancetta & roasted shallot
Rabbit in Parma Ham with Scallops on Taglioni - recipes game
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Old 03-19-2008, 06:30 AM
 
4,721 posts, read 13,612,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
People don't really raise Rabbit for meat so the Rabbit you eat is wild , so no pets harmed I promise.

And believe me Rabbits can be really vicious creatures. A vet who is a friend of mine is constantly having to find new homes for those cute and fluffy critters who keep biting people and being aggressive. I was bitten by one once and it almost cut to the bone !
According to my friend it's about the worst pet anyone can have for their kids.
Of course theyre aggressive Moose, they dont want to be eaten !!
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Old 03-19-2008, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Hampton Roads, Virginia
1,123 posts, read 4,702,308 times
Reputation: 667
[quote=Mooseketeer;3177413]
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacylee926 View Post


What's wrong with rabbit ? It's hardly a revolutionary meat. It tastes wonderful . Hare is even better.
- Nothing is wrong with rabbit - I think I have even had it before. However, my pesky southern family would not care for it. As an only child, I grew up on frogs legs, escargot, liver, duck - many things that are not standard fare in typical US families. Thanks for posting the recipe though - I'm sure there are people here that have hunters in the family and would like a new recipe for it.
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Old 03-19-2008, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Look out your window.......
320 posts, read 827,185 times
Reputation: 262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
And believe me Rabbits can be really vicious creatures. A vet who is a friend of mine is constantly having to find new homes for those cute and fluffy critters who keep biting people and being aggressive. I was bitten by one once and it almost cut to the bone !
According to my friend it's about the worst pet anyone can have for their kids.

Yep, rabbits can be vicious..........you've seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail...right?
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Old 03-19-2008, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,513,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wktully View Post
Yep, rabbits can be vicious..........you've seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail...right?
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Old 03-19-2008, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Texas
690 posts, read 2,353,894 times
Reputation: 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Are you Mexican? I wonder what foods would be traditional for Easter in Mexico, since it's probably a huge holiday there?
No, but I eat like I am.
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