U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-08-2017, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Meridian
135 posts, read 278,751 times
Reputation: 91

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Everyone who has visited Spain, Portugal, Greece, or Italy comes back complaining about the blandness of the cuisine.
They must not have tried Patatas Bravas, pasta arrabiata, anything al pil pil, or Chourico stew. Not in the same category as Thai, but certainly not bland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-08-2017, 07:59 AM
 
Location: West of Louisiana, East of New Mexico
2,449 posts, read 1,785,977 times
Reputation: 5488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
Well, this US house uses all kinds of spice and chilies. I think it depends where you are and how much you have traveled and sampled other cuisines.

Outside my back door I grow habeneros, serranos, hawaiian and thai chilies.

Thai, vietnamese, chinese, japanese, Indian, middle eastern and mexican food is cooked on a regular basis, along with a bunch of others.

Yeah, wasabi can be hot, it hits you in the sinuses in one good wallup!!
I'd add west African and Caribbean food on the hot list as well. I think those populations are more concentrated and you don't see as many of those restaurants outside of major population centers. Most Americans haven't sampled authentic jollof rice, pepperpot soup or spicy jerk chicken.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 08:16 AM
 
812 posts, read 412,402 times
Reputation: 1396
Different regions of a country will have a completely different flavor profile. In China, for example, many of the foods are sweeter, light, and more mild in Shanghai, but if you go to Chongqing or Chengdu then you better prepare your tongue, GI tract, and butthole for the burn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
2,876 posts, read 1,156,672 times
Reputation: 3547
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
I'd add west African and Caribbean food on the hot list as well. I think those populations are more concentrated and you don't see as many of those restaurants outside of major population centers. Most Americans haven't sampled authentic jollof rice, pepperpot soup or spicy jerk chicken.
Caribbean food, which has strong West African influences, is more "flavor spicy" than "heat spicy". Think of ingredients like lime, garlic, ginger, cinnamon, etc., rather than jalapeno or habanero. I had Caribbean food many times, and this was my experience. Not saying that there are no "heat spicy" Caribbean foods, like jerk chicken, but still.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 11:35 AM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,006 posts, read 2,670,289 times
Reputation: 4165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyewackette View Post
You are out of your mind if you think Thai is hotter than Indian food. Thai food doesn't come close to Indian for spiciness, nor for the VARIETY of ways to hot us up.
It depends on the dish. Based on all of the dishes I've had, it seems like 75% of Thai dishes are hot, while only about 60% of Indian dishes have heat. Many Indian dishes aren't actually Indian, but British. This would include things like butter chicken and tikka masala. These dishes are often mild.

Also, since a lot of Indian dishes contain dairy, this seems to tone down the spiciness.

Two of the hottest dishes I've ever had were Thai (pad kra pao) and Indian (vindaloo).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
68,164 posts, read 78,046,674 times
Reputation: 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
I made the mistake the first time I tried sushi about 15 years ago, of thinking wasabi was guacamole. I smeared it all over my sushi only to get a most unpleasant surprise. I thought my heart was going to stop. I'm Italian, born in NY, raised in Florida and then Long Island and we don't use much in the way of "hot" spices. There are a few dishes that I will add a little red pepper to but I like to taste my food rather than cover up the flavor with hot sauce or additives.
love wasabi but right now you are making my mouth burn just thinking about your experience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
7,863 posts, read 7,211,225 times
Reputation: 16213
We eat super spicy/hot food.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 02:48 PM
 
Location: A place that's too cold
3,965 posts, read 3,918,595 times
Reputation: 9478
I wonder if it's a genetic thing? My body simply can't handle hot-spicy foods. The pain on my tongue and lips is horrible. And it doesn't take much spice at all to cause loud, almost painful hiccups. It's embarrassing!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 02:55 PM
 
Location: New York Area
12,930 posts, read 4,900,733 times
Reputation: 10393
Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
American: Most American dishes have no level of spicy. Most Americans have a very low tolerance to spicy foods. The interesting thing is that America is home to the "you'll die if you use this" hot sauces. But I think those are more for macho challenges.
I am not "most Americans." I love spice. Also I'd put Ethiopian up a bit further. And Jamaican ranks in their somewhere near the middle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2017, 06:02 PM
 
4,484 posts, read 2,644,974 times
Reputation: 6527
I'm American and nothing is spicy to me unless there is at least habeneros involved but preferably ghost chilis or scorpions. The only food I've had at restaurants that was remotely spicy to me is at Thai places in LA and Thailand and some American places that specialize in spicy food like wings with a ridiculous level sauce. When I lived in Boston the East Coast grill had an annual Hell Night which was great if you like heat. But mostly it's impossible to get really spicy food in a restaurant in the U.S. because even when you ask for it they don't seem to believe you. Unfortunately that is especially true if you a white guy at a Thai restaurant. There is one Thai place in LA known for crazy spicy food and even there it took 2-3 visits before they gave me the real level of spicy. In Thailand they seemed to take my word for it more but still were always surprised with how spicy I wanted. And even in Thailand I still had to add extra chilis at the table
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top