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Old 02-20-2018, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,079 posts, read 7,347,515 times
Reputation: 16846

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Foodie.

Self proclaimed 'foodies' are ruining the business. Chefs hate them.

 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:56 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
8,769 posts, read 8,081,713 times
Reputation: 13159
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
What is a super taster, supposedly..?
Someone who doesn't like sulfur foods and/or bitter foods. I don't like broccoli, cauliflower, cooked cabbage, raw onions, tonic water, hard-boiled eggs, for example, so I fit the description. I don't often refer to myself as a "supertaster," but I fit the definition.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
2,570 posts, read 1,446,179 times
Reputation: 7416
Two that come to mind that I hear all the time on Top Chef are:
  1. The use of "bake off" instead of "bake," as in "I'm going to bake off the biscuits."
  2. The use of the word "forward," as in, "I wanted to make a beet-forward dish."
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:07 PM
 
Location: So Cal
13,911 posts, read 10,018,895 times
Reputation: 12205
I always feel slightly pretentious using the word "edamame" instead of "soybeans," but my first time trying them was in a Japanese restaurant so that's just how I think of them.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:13 PM
 
Location: So Cal
13,911 posts, read 10,018,895 times
Reputation: 12205
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Foodie.

Self proclaimed 'foodies' are ruining the business. Chefs hate them.
I love cooking and eating, but I just can't use this word seriously.

I brought an appetizer plate to a gathering recently, and the hostess tasted one and kind of gave me an approving nod, and then said, "And I'm a foodie." Give me a break. lol
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:15 PM
 
5,437 posts, read 3,264,142 times
Reputation: 13651
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaOfGrass View Post
I brought an appetizer plate to a gathering recently, and the hostess tasted one and kind of gave me an approving nod, and then said, "And I'm a foodie." Give me a break. lol
Even worse? When a parent gives their child some trendy food item and then says fondly to everyone in earshot, "He's such a little foodie."
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:15 PM
 
228 posts, read 149,662 times
Reputation: 614
^ Oh yes! The Pop-of-Whatever, I'm tired of hearing that phrase.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,079 posts, read 7,347,515 times
Reputation: 16846
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I swear I once read a description of a meal which mentioned "A table full of brunchy goodness." Brunchy?
OMG that is awesome! Brunchy goodness! Hahahahaha!
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,761 posts, read 38,876,839 times
Reputation: 48467
Quote:
Originally Posted by fleetiebelle View Post
Someone once gave me a cookbook from the UK, and I had to google a lot of ingredients--"aubergine", "haricots" and "courgette" I knew, but "swede", "rocket", and "cos" not so much (also the metric system was a challenge. )
Yep, forgot about the rocket/arugula thing (which I actually first encountered in a novel), and haricots.

For me, it mostly comes up in both cookbooks (I buy a LOT of cooking stuff from Half-Price Books, and they stock quite a bit from UK publishers), and in visiting and grocery shopping with UK relatives.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,761 posts, read 38,876,839 times
Reputation: 48467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Professional jargon is necessary to describe a thing or a process accurately. This is true whether we're discussing uranium processing, Greek philology, or vegetables. Its purpose is not to obscure but to enlighten. Those who genuinely seek more knowledge are more than willing to learn the jargon necessary. To be called pretentious is, more often than not, an unintended compliment.
I think the difference here is that cooking is easily and widely done by nonprofessionals, unlike say, processing of uranium. And it's being taught to/demonstrated for nonprofessionals on Food Network shows, etc. There isn't any real reason to use what would be regarded as industry-speak when the audience is generally by and large not a part of the industry. It's similar to how various health care professionals are trained to use patient-or client-friendly language, depending on the given audience.

In the case of cooking shows, the jargon often isn't, actually, necessary.
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