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Old 02-20-2018, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 9,968,981 times
Reputation: 28040

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
...Those who genuinely seek more knowledge are more than willing to learn the jargon necessary. To be called pretentious is, more often than not, an unintended compliment.
Best post in this thread!!!!

I've been exposed to plenty of European cooking, so I'm "bi-lingual" when it comes to recipes. Also, I do extensive research on various cuisines, ingredients, cooking tools, and cooking devices. If I'm labeled as pretentious I don't really care.

Oh, and I'm a foodie.

 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:42 PM
 
4,848 posts, read 4,554,995 times
Reputation: 9020
I find it interesting that I see/hear wine being described as tasting like just about anything other than the juice of grapes.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,740 posts, read 38,835,394 times
Reputation: 48398
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Even worse? When a parent gives their child some trendy food item and then says fondly to everyone in earshot, "He's such a little foodie."
I would say, based on personal experience, it's even more annoying to have others dub your kid "a foodie," when he's just eating normal food that normal people eat. We run into this, because people are so used to children who subsist on Goldfish crackers and juiceboxes and chicken nuggets and will turn their noses up at anything else.

No, my toddler is not a "foodie." He eats avocado, because I've been feeding it to him since he was old enough to smash easily mashable food with his toothless gums. He got bananas, too. Love of them didn't stick, love of avocado did. Luck of the draw. He eats different kinds of cheese, because we have different kinds of cheese at home, not just string cheese. He eats bacon and eggs because his dad likes to make full cooked breakfasts. He's just as happy with Cheerios and milk. He eats cherry tomatoes by the pint basket, because we grow them in our garden, and he thinks it's fun to pluck them off the plant and chow down. He'll also eat his weight in M&Ms if left unattended with a bag, and would gladly make a meal of graham crackers or sugar cookies, like many people, and if I ever happen to have a bag of Fritos, I'd better not even let him see it.

Yet, if you go to a restaurant and have a toddler who will eat various fruits and vegetables, and not have to be served a grilled cheese, the response is, bizarrely, "Oh, foodie baby." No, normal human.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,740 posts, read 38,835,394 times
Reputation: 48398
Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
I find it interesting that I see/hear wine being described as tasting like just about anything other than the juice of grapes.
Probably because wine doesn't taste like grape juice, in most cases.

Kind of how sauerkraut doesn't taste like cabbage, even though it's made of fermented cabbage.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,171 posts, read 12,153,810 times
Reputation: 23441
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Food jargon is the worst. Everything mentioned already makes me cringe, except the non-US words when they are used in a non-US context. I guess I cringe easily. Some more, mostly from cooking magazines:

Abbreviations like veggies, OJ, PB&J, taters, nanners, etc.

The word "pop" (as in, "adds a pop of color," "an extra pop of flavor," "makes the food pop," etc. Actually I am not fond of the word "pop" used for soda either but I recognize that that is regional).

The phrase "comes together": "This recipe comes together quickly."

Adding an unnecessary "y" to words: "biscuit-y topping." "noodle-y casserole."

Which leads to the construction used, and used all too frequently, in these unfortunate examples: "Chocolatey yumminess." "Cheesy deliciousness." I swear I once read a description of a meal which mentioned "A table full of brunchy goodness." Brunchy?

Some of the adjectival ad-copy ways of describing food are stupid. But it doesn't usually bother me. I think they are just using spoken English to get their message across. If it communicates successfully, then I think ad-copy descriptions are OK. When the ad-copy is hard to understand, then it serves no purpose.

But I personally still hate the term crispy. In my antediluvian mind, the word is crisp. But crispy has won out. it is unusual to describe a food as crisp now. It must be crispy.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 02:04 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,144 posts, read 51,049,842 times
Reputation: 82049
Yum, yummy foodie, sammich, subs, food porn, foodgasm, smashed, munchies, delish, num num...
 
Old 02-20-2018, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,178 posts, read 25,152,636 times
Reputation: 24907
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5-all View Post
Yes! Sammy and sammich. Also smashed potatoes.
Makes an adult sound like a child who can't pronounce spaghetti.
Pasgetti.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 02:09 PM
 
5,435 posts, read 3,256,360 times
Reputation: 13646
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Yum, yummy foodie, sammich, subs, food porn, foodgasm, smashed, munchies, delish, num num...
The bolded should be a banned word!
 
Old 02-20-2018, 02:20 PM
 
3,447 posts, read 1,663,194 times
Reputation: 2196
Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
I find it interesting that I see/hear wine being described as tasting like just about anything other than the juice of grapes.
It isn't very descriptive to describe the taste of wine as the "[fermented] juice of grapes." The flavors, textures, and aromas of wine vary. Description is useful and important. Hence, description by comparison:

Black fruits
Citrus
Melon
Vanilla
Creamy
Etc.

Language is more flexible--and more useful--than you posit.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 9,968,981 times
Reputation: 28040
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCityTheBridge View Post
It isn't very descriptive to describe the taste of wine as the "[fermented] juice of grapes." The flavors, textures, and aromas of wine vary. Description is useful and important. Hence, description by comparison:

Black fruits
Citrus
Melon
Vanilla
Creamy
Etc.

Language is more flexible--and more useful--than you posit.
I'm a wine "snub". Meaning I can't stand the stuff. The only flavor notes I get are "sweet" or "bitter".
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