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Old 03-04-2018, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,368 posts, read 21,395,920 times
Reputation: 27319

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I used to eat scotch eggs when my Scot-descent BIL made them for the family Christmas party. So good.

I hear and see "brekkie" when I go to Ontario.
It always reminds me of preggie.

 
Old 03-04-2018, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,368 posts, read 21,395,920 times
Reputation: 27319
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Iím caffeinating, right now!

I have also pronounced ASAP as a word, asap.

Iíve already posted my pet peeve, crispy! Language changes in ways we donít always like. Right now we seem to be losing prepositions.

Enjoy your cuppa!
I like crispy.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epQc4u98WFI
 
Old 03-13-2018, 12:59 PM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 7,527,220 times
Reputation: 14986
Quote:
Originally Posted by graceC View Post
I love watching food and travel shows and I watch Andrew Zimmern a lot. I think his show is fun and entertaining. But one thing I can't stand is his penchant to use annoying food jargons, like 'Umami'. I think it's pretentious, especially when most Japanese would tell you the one ingredient that brings up the so-called Umami flavor is MSG!

Another word I find pretentious is 'aubergine'. Unless you're French, or it's listed on a French cookbook or on a menu of a French Restaurant, just call it 'eggplant' for goodness' sake! Nobody will think less of you for saying that, I promise!

Then there's 'molecular gastronomy', which is basically eating your food in the form of shaving foam. Although I have to be honest, I can't think of another name for this type of food to make it sound edible.

What other food jargons do you find annoying?
Aubergine is the name used in a lot of the English-speaking world. If you said eggplant in England, for example, people would be confused. After all, eggplant is a rather stupid name for a long purple vegetable. Umami is one of the five sensory tastes - its as pretentious as salty, sweet, sour and bitter. You can say "savory" instead - but that already means something else so its not as useful.


You're pretty opinionated about word use for someone who says "jargons" even though jargon is also the plural term.


Now if you could get behind a drive to stop the pretentious pronunciation of herb as erb (although some people sound like a bullfrog when they say erb), then I'd understand that.
 
Old 03-13-2018, 01:13 PM
 
6,977 posts, read 10,241,404 times
Reputation: 13612
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I thought it was písgetti!
When our smarty-pants kids were little, they called it "Pus getti"
 
Old 03-13-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
7,481 posts, read 5,156,070 times
Reputation: 9166
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
Umami is one of the five sensory tastes - its as pretentious as salty, sweet, sour and bitter. You can say "savory" instead - but that already means something else so its not as useful.

Umami is "savory" in Japanese. Pretty much the literal translation.
It would be like calling your Brie Cheese "Fromage Brie." I wouldn't be surprised if soon I go to a higher-end restaurant and the waiter describes a sampler as a platter of various fromages from the cellars of Par-ee just to make it sound more appealing.
 
Old 03-14-2018, 01:56 PM
 
4,856 posts, read 4,559,024 times
Reputation: 9028
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post

Now if you could get behind a drive to stop the pretentious pronunciation of herb as erb (although some people sound like a bullfrog when they say erb), then I'd understand that.

It is just as correct and un-pretentious for an American to say "erb" as it is for a British person to say "herb". At the time of North American colonization by England, British people pronounced it as "erb". Since then, British have adopted the "herb" pronunciation, while Americans, as in several other cases, have retained the older pronunciation.
 
Old 03-14-2018, 02:05 PM
 
Location: SF Bay area
986 posts, read 405,422 times
Reputation: 1385
Default "artisanal"

does it really mean anything?
 
Old 03-14-2018, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
26,789 posts, read 17,234,614 times
Reputation: 38911
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW4me View Post
does it really mean anything?
Yes.
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Old 03-15-2018, 07:20 AM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 7,527,220 times
Reputation: 14986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
Umami is "savory" in Japanese. Pretty much the literal translation.
It would be like calling your Brie Cheese "Fromage Brie." I wouldn't be surprised if soon I go to a higher-end restaurant and the waiter describes a sampler as a platter of various fromages from the cellars of Par-ee just to make it sound more appealing.
Umami is the word to use because it was first discovered and noted by a Japanese scientist. Why change a perfectly good word? Everyone knows what Umami means - whereas savory can also just mean a non-sweet food - savory or sweet being used as antonyms.


The refusal to use the proper word is called reverse snobbery - and its ridiculous.




Its like saying "brie cheese" instead of just saying brie
 
Old 03-15-2018, 07:30 AM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 7,527,220 times
Reputation: 14986
Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
It is just as correct and un-pretentious for an American to say "erb" as it is for a British person to say "herb". At the time of North American colonization by England, British people pronounced it as "erb". Since then, British have adopted the "herb" pronunciation, while Americans, as in several other cases, have retained the older pronunciation.
That's entirely a guess - I've seen the same nonsense before written like some statement of fact when its just a specious construct. In Victorian times people were certainly pronouncing Culpeper's Herbal with an H. There's no reason to believe, other than some ex post facto construction to win an argument, that herb was pronounced with a French pronunciation as late as the 1600s, especially given the widespread phonetic spelling at the time - which doesn't support the pronunciation as erb at all.


All it needs is one person to write some justification like that on a blog and before you know 2 years later its an "internet fact"
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