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Old 02-20-2018, 11:44 AM
 
Location: NoVa
2,039 posts, read 2,779,115 times
Reputation: 2785

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I love watching food and travel shows and I watch Andrew Zimmern a lot. I think his show is fun and entertaining. But one thing I can't stand is his penchant to use annoying food jargons, like 'Umami'. I think it's pretentious, especially when most Japanese would tell you the one ingredient that brings up the so-called Umami flavor is MSG!

Another word I find pretentious is 'aubergine'. Unless you're French, or it's listed on a French cookbook or on a menu of a French Restaurant, just call it 'eggplant' for goodness' sake! Nobody will think less of you for saying that, I promise!

Then there's 'molecular gastronomy', which is basically eating your food in the form of shaving foam. Although I have to be honest, I can't think of another name for this type of food to make it sound edible.

What other food jargons do you find annoying?

 
Old 02-20-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,222 posts, read 25,416,434 times
Reputation: 25117
"sammy" and "sammich" make me cringe. It's "sandwich."

ETA: Hahaha!! I thought the term was "unami" (not "umami"). I had to google it. You're right, of course. Shows you how little I know. But I do know that a sandwich is called a sandwich.

Last edited by DawnMTL; 02-20-2018 at 12:30 PM..
 
Old 02-20-2018, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
Reputation: 48613
The UK uses "aubergine." And "courgette," "swede," "cafetiere," etc.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:00 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
28,207 posts, read 2,196,057 times
Reputation: 9838
I also dislike pretentious people ( & posters ) But the use of the term aubergine does not bother me, as I belive it is called that everywhere except the USA. It is not just a French term. Anytime they try to sound as if they know more than they do is annoying, I can't think of particular examples. Well I can think of some on this forum, but it would be rude, but I can't think of any off the tv.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
21,465 posts, read 22,698,975 times
Reputation: 45139
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
The UK uses "aubergine." And "courgette," "swede," "cafetiere," etc.
Someone once gave me a cookbook from the UK, and I had to google a lot of ingredients--"aubergine", "haricots" and "courgette" I knew, but "swede", "rocket", and "cos" not so much (also the metric system was a challenge. )

The thing with people like Zimmern and other food TV personalities is that they have to describe food to people who can't smell or taste it, so they have to use words to evoke a feeling that goes beyond, "oh, man. This is really good."

Last edited by fleetiebelle; 02-20-2018 at 12:26 PM..
 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,186 posts, read 10,131,783 times
Reputation: 18273
Quote:
Originally Posted by graceC View Post
I love watching food and travel shows and I watch Andrew Zimmern a lot. I think his show is fun and entertaining. But one thing I can't stand is his penchant to use annoying food jargons, like 'Umami'. I think it's pretentious, especially when most Japanese would tell you the one ingredient that brings up the so-called Umami flavor is MSG!

Another word I find pretentious is 'aubergine'. Unless you're French, or it's listed on a French cookbook or on a menu of a French Restaurant, just call it 'eggplant' for goodness' sake! Nobody will think less of you for saying that, I promise!

Then there's 'molecular gastronomy', which is basically eating your food in the form of shaving foam. Although I have to be honest, I can't think of another name for this type of food to make it sound edible.

What other food jargons do you find annoying?
Professional jargon is necessary to describe a thing or a process accurately. This is true whether we're discussing uranium processing, Greek philology, or vegetables. Its purpose is not to obscure but to enlighten. Those who genuinely seek more knowledge are more than willing to learn the jargon necessary. To be called pretentious is, more often than not, an unintended compliment.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:37 PM
 
Location: NYC
1,466 posts, read 919,560 times
Reputation: 3318
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
"sammy" and "sammich" make me cringe. It's "sandwich."

ETA: Hahaha!! I thought the term was "unami" (not "umami"). I had to google it. You're right, of course. Shows you how little I know. But I do know that a sandwich is called a sandwich.
Yes! Sammy and sammich. Also smashed potatoes.
Makes an adult sound like a child who can't pronounce spaghetti.
 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:46 PM
 
230 posts, read 152,999 times
Reputation: 629
Anyone who thinks they are a "super taster"

Yes Umami has gotten annoying

Meat is now referred to as "the protein." How tidily sanitized.

"trash fish" to refer to massive amounts of ocean depleting by catch that die in nets to catch the "desirable proteins"
 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,402 posts, read 3,537,755 times
Reputation: 22612
What is a super taster, supposedly..?
 
Old 02-20-2018, 12:52 PM
 
5,501 posts, read 3,355,263 times
Reputation: 13917
Food jargon is the worst. Everything mentioned already makes me cringe, except the non-US words when they are used in a non-US context. I guess I cringe easily. Some more, mostly from cooking magazines:

Abbreviations like veggies, OJ, PB&J, taters, nanners, etc.

The word "pop" (as in, "adds a pop of color," "an extra pop of flavor," "makes the food pop," etc. Actually I am not fond of the word "pop" used for soda either but I recognize that that is regional).

The phrase "comes together": "This recipe comes together quickly."

Adding an unnecessary "y" to words: "biscuit-y topping." "noodle-y casserole."

Which leads to the construction used, and used all too frequently, in these unfortunate examples: "Chocolatey yumminess." "Cheesy deliciousness." I swear I once read a description of a meal which mentioned "A table full of brunchy goodness." Brunchy?
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