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Old 03-07-2018, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
14,173 posts, read 17,232,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
Gee, I wonder why they call it the "Instant" Pot? It cuts cooking times in half or more for most dishes. Beans for example, I can go from dried beans to fully cooked in less than an hour. Try that in a regular pot.
Is the sarcasm necessary?

MoonLady said it well:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonlady View Post
Agreed- some things, like beans are much faster. But not everything. Between waiting for it to come to pressure, cooking and then letting the pressure release, it can take almost as much time for some dishes. Things like rice and boiled eggs to me take just as long on the stovetop with less fuss. I make carne guisada in the IP a lot (we like it for tacos) and it's much faster than cooking on top of the stove and I don't have to worry about checking it to make sure it's not burning. I also made lasagna and a cheesecake in my IP and both took a fraction of the time it would have taken in the oven. All depends on what you cook!
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,212 posts, read 12,171,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonlady View Post
Agreed- some things, like beans are much faster. But not everything. Between waiting for it to come to pressure, cooking and then letting the pressure release, it can take almost as much time for some dishes. Things like rice and boiled eggs to me take just as long on the stovetop with less fuss. I make carne guisada in the IP a lot (we like it for tacos) and it's much faster than cooking on top of the stove and I don't have to worry about checking it to make sure it's not burning. I also made lasagna and a cheesecake in my IP and both took a fraction of the time it would have taken in the oven. All depends on what you cook!
Actually, I find that brown rice cooks faster in the IP. and the rice is better than what I get from my rice cooker.
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:41 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
2,757 posts, read 1,843,634 times
Reputation: 3337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
Is the sarcasm necessary?

MoonLady said it well:
No, the sarcasm isn't necessary you are right but the question stands, why do they call it the Instant Pot. Some things seems so obvious but some people still ignore them. That's why it's a bit frustrating.

It's obvious that cooking in an instant is impossible but moonlady failed to give examples of when cooking in an IP is slower than the "regular" way. It also heats up very fast, I've noticed that. It will take a bit longer if you start with cold ingredients. A regular pot on a stove also takes time. The cooking time is less than usual. That leaves the pressure release time which varies. Overall, it does save time regardless.

Quote from the company web site:
Quote:
It speeds up cooking by 2~6 times using up to 70% less energy, and, above all, produces nutritious healthy food in a convenient and consistent fashion.
https://instantpot.com/
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Old 03-08-2018, 03:00 PM
Status: "Stick a fork in me..." (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,701 posts, read 9,034,502 times
Reputation: 4067
You do realize that Instant Pot is the brand name right? I think it's somewhat appropriate since it can cook some foods much faster. It doesn't mean everything that you can cook in it is faster -some people just like the set it and forget it convenience. I've seen those charts where it shows you how "fast" things cook, but they fail to incorporate the time to pressure and time to release, so it is misleading. I have not regretted my purchase one bit, but I have changed my idea about what it can do. I did make a pretty good pork tenderloin in a balsamic glaze the other day, but I'd still prefer to cook it on the grill and in about the same amount of time.

I have talked many people out of buying one because I know how they cook and they were swayed by all the hype around it. In reality, it still takes a fair amount of prep and planning and if you're not that kind of cook, it's not going to help you there.

I happen to like to cook a lot and I like to make everything from scratch, so it's a great tool for me. I don't necessarily think everyone should have one.
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Old 03-08-2018, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,776 posts, read 27,841,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Mac View Post
I looked at the 6 quart Instant Pot today at Kohl's, and that thing is HUGE ! I'm re-thinking the pressure cooker idea.
You need some extra space for the food you make, so you only fill it 1/2 to 2/3s.
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Old Yesterday, 01:50 PM
 
1,012 posts, read 558,266 times
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There have been references to the safety of modern vs old pressure cookers. It's true that old pressure cookers may not have all the safety features as modern. But pressure cookers have existed for a long time. Our (2) 30 year old Mirro aluminum pressure stove top cooker appears to have the same safety features as a new similar ones.
We use a new Cuisinart electric now but I dug an old 4qt Mirro out of the basement to consider use with a camp stove. We've owned it since new so we know it has not been subjected to any abuse or over pressure damage.
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Old Yesterday, 08:08 PM
 
1,168 posts, read 1,296,562 times
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I have a Fagor, which I understand comes to pressure quicker than IP. I do like it, but find I use it mostly as a slow cooker. It's by far the best slow cooker I have had. I've used it a handful of times as a pressure cooker, but couldn't even tell you what I made. I just really like cast iron and dutch ovens on a gas flame.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,212 posts, read 12,171,717 times
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I use my Instant Pot frequently. I prefer it to my old Fagor stovetop cooker, though that gave me very good service.

I may decide to also buy a smaller one for cooking rice or potatoes to accompany what is being cooked in the 6qt.

But the IP does not take the place of stir frying, or doing a saute, grilling or roasting. It is a way of producing soups, stews, chilis and meat. I do not like it for cooking veggie side dishes.

It does some things very well.
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Old Today, 11:47 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,125 posts, read 8,506,365 times
Reputation: 20339
I received an Instant Pot as a gift, and I've been very happy with it. I find that the stainless steel insert cleans up nicely. I'd say I use it at least 3-4 times per week. Yesterday, I used it to make a delicious tomato sauce.
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Old Today, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
18,649 posts, read 9,732,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I use my Instant Pot frequently. I prefer it to my old Fagor stovetop cooker, though that gave me very good service.

I may decide to also buy a smaller one for cooking rice or potatoes to accompany what is being cooked in the 6qt.

But the IP does not take the place of stir frying, or doing a saute, grilling or roasting. It is a way of producing soups, stews, chilis and meat. I do not like it for cooking veggie side dishes.

It does some things very well.
I make a big batch of rice and then freeze in individual portions so I can easily grab one or two and nuke them while cooking a main in the IP. It works best if if you slightly undercook the rice, so you can add a little water and it finishes cooking in the microwave rather than getting overcooked. My son loves rice, so it's nice to make sure I always have some in the freezer for him. Wouldn't help if you wanted to cook potatoes, though!

I keep toying around with getting a 8 qt, but haven't pulled the lever on that. And I don't really have room for both in my kitchen, so I suspect that rather than getting the benefit of having two, one of them would end up mostly living in the garage and not getting used enough to justify it. But I did buy a second liner, so that I could prep the second food item and put that on to cook as soon as I released the pressure on the first. Not quite as effective as cooking two different things at the same time, but reasonably close to it in functionality without buying a second unit.
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