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Old 03-06-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,448 posts, read 1,181,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
I don't think there is a fruit or vegetable that I dislike.

Turnips happen to be one of my favorite vegetables. Mashed with butter, cream, sea salt and black pepper...mmm.

Also, I think that more Americans are eating fresh vegetables than they did in the post WWII era - 50s, 60s, 70s. and I think more people are enjoying more vegetables and fruit than they ever have in my life time.
Mmmmmm! Thatís how I make my mashed rutabaga. It takes forever for the rutabaga to get soft enough to mash, but itís so good, itís worth the wait! I have them every Xmas!
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Old 03-06-2018, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,175 posts, read 12,162,554 times
Reputation: 23446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Persimmons grow wild in many parts of the south and no doubt they were widely used during the Great Depression. In my adolescence I was tricked into taking a bite out of a green one and it seemed like hours before the numbness went away.
I lived in St. Louis County, and in our front yard we had a persimmon tree and a wild cherry tree. I have eaten wild cherries--more skin and seed than anything else and really tangy they are.

The persimmon tree was real pain; it dropped ripe ugly fruit all over the lawn and driveway in the fall.

But he had eaten persimmons, and knew what they tasted like. He showed no interest in eating them, that I can recall.
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Old 03-06-2018, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Central IL
12,964 posts, read 6,861,234 times
Reputation: 30131
Used to be able to get boysenberry frozen pies...now I never see boysenberries frozen in any form. I have managed to find canned boysenberries at a premium price on Amazon - I guess they are too fragile to transport fresh but they're delicious!
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Old 03-06-2018, 11:26 AM
 
5,435 posts, read 3,256,360 times
Reputation: 13646
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Used to be able to get boysenberry frozen pies...now I never see boysenberries frozen in any form. I have managed to find canned boysenberries at a premium price on Amazon - I guess they are too fragile to transport fresh but they're delicious!
Boysenberries were developed in my area of SoCal. We had a bush in our backyard and yes, they were delicious! But definitely fragile, like blackberries and raspberries. They always seem to be expensive, even at the height of the season.
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Old 03-06-2018, 11:28 AM
 
5,435 posts, read 3,256,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I lived in St. Louis County, and in our front yard we had a persimmon tree and a wild cherry tree. I have eaten wild cherries--more skin and seed than anything else and really tangy they are.

The persimmon tree was real pain; it dropped ripe ugly fruit all over the lawn and driveway in the fall.

But he had eaten persimmons, and knew what they tasted like. He showed no interest in eating them, that I can recall.
Who's "he"? It looks like something is missing from your post.

I've never been a big fan of persimmons. My mother-in-law grew up eating them in Brazil, and loves them, but I think there are many tastier fruits.
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Old 03-06-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Mt Shasta , Ca.
1,783 posts, read 1,214,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Broccoli Rabe, Radicchio, Endive and Escarole are some that stick out to me that I do enjoy but rarely see used or have had people say they don't what know they are.

My husband makes an endive salad to die for , passed down from his mom it was a dutch staple in their house in The Netherlands . 1-3X's a month though - it is not cheap .

It's wild usually but I remember eating Poke salad in the 60's and 70's but you really REALLY had to know how to cook it . I actually saw some somewhere not too long ago .

I don't like Tamarind at all . Just no .
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Old 03-06-2018, 02:30 PM
 
7,643 posts, read 10,012,422 times
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Parsnips--I think they had an unusual taste that I didn't like. Collards--in the South they do, endive.
Pomegranate and other more unusual fruits.
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Old 03-06-2018, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,175 posts, read 12,162,554 times
Reputation: 23446
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Who's "he"? It looks like something is missing from your post.

I've never been a big fan of persimmons. My mother-in-law grew up eating them in Brazil, and loves them, but I think there are many tastier fruits.
I took out a reference to my dad, who finally cut the tree down. Sorry about my poor editing.
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Old 03-06-2018, 06:59 PM
 
Location: northern New England
1,598 posts, read 643,420 times
Reputation: 6291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
Parsnips--I think they had an unusual taste that I didn't like. Collards--in the South they do, endive.
Pomegranate and other more unusual fruits.
You should try parsnips again, they're pretty good. Mild flavor, not an unusual taste.
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Old 03-06-2018, 07:17 PM
 
3,666 posts, read 5,720,171 times
Reputation: 4204
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Fresh figs. They aren't good unless they are picked fully ripe and they do not ship well at all, so it is very rare to see them for sale. If I do see them in the market I won't buy them because I know they have been picked before ripe.

I've never seen Jerusalem artichokes in the market. I think that the people who are eating them are growing their own. Mother Earth News type of people grow them.
We had a voracious fig tree at my childhood home. Too bad I don't like figs, mom was always chasing us down trying to get us to eat one of the 500 figs we had.
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