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Old 03-07-2018, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
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You know what I don't really see anymore? Fiddleheads!
I remember them from my youth. I never was a big fan but maybe I should retry them.
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Old 03-07-2018, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Definitely the paw-paw. I knew where some grew in the late summer when I lived in Indiana. Most people here in Tennessee have never heard of them.
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Old 03-07-2018, 10:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Purplecow, you have no idea what you are missing. Route veggies can be so much better than almost any other kind. An example: beets, they are sweet, great source of many vit and can be fixed many ways. Turnips are good raw or cooked. I could go on and on.
The biggest root vegetable that ever has gone, went, or will go into my mouth is a radish. And those little buggers are awful.
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Old 03-07-2018, 10:38 AM
 
20,219 posts, read 28,289,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicshark View Post
You know what I don't really see anymore? Fiddleheads!
I remember them from my youth. I never was a big fan but maybe I should retry them.
I would see them at Whole Foods when I lived in DC, Philly and even in NC (Durham). They're great blanched in hot water for a few minutes and then sauteed with olive oil and garlic. Their season is kind of short and typically would them for just a few weeks in April/May.
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Old 03-07-2018, 01:32 PM
 
25,839 posts, read 49,753,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Fresh figs. They aren't good unless they are picked fully ripe and they do not ship well at all, so it is very rare to see them for sale. If I do see them in the market I won't buy them because I know they have been picked before ripe.

I've never seen Jerusalem artichokes in the market. I think that the people who are eating them are growing their own. Mother Earth News type of people grow them.
I bought a very old house with a decrepit fig tree in the back... it was totally bowed over with the crown almost on the dirt.

Planned to take it out and Mom sampled one of the figs and couldn't believe the quality....

So she took several shoots and planted them and then became known as the fig lady...

The local produce market had figs but not very good... Mom told the owner hers are much better... for nearly 20 years mom would take a flat or two each day to the market in season and trade for other produce...

Customers would ask about the figs... they were black and came from a cutting at Mission San Jose... so Mission Figs...

You are right... they don't keep unless dried... they have to be picked at the right moment and any rain causes havoc... even a heavy fog.

Dad love Rhubarb pie... have not seen one in decades...

The house with the fig tree also had quints... but never could figure out what to do with quints.
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Old 03-07-2018, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Living near our Nation's Capitol since 2010
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We love turnip, rutabaga, celery root and beets.

All of those are somewhat strong flavored, but when paired with the right foods they are fabulous.
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Old 03-07-2018, 02:03 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
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Some fruits and vegetables that were common where I lived abroad in Europe:

Medlars (a particular favorite)
Quince (I ate sliced fresh quince, nice and tart/tangy - look like a funky large-ish pear/apple hybrid)
Parsley root (looks like a parsnip, but doesn't taste at all like a parsnip. We buy these in the US at a specialty store)
Celery root (Best 'cream of' soup I've ever had - and no, stalk celery does not even come close)
Gooseberries (I never cared for these)
Red or black currants - these were very popular in season
Fresh, sweet, green peas - the pods would be brought to market the morning they were plucked. Any longer than 24 hours off the vine, and they begin to convert to starch and are therefore useless as far as flavor. The ladies who sold these in their stalls would allow you to break into a pod and taste the pea to ensure they were truly fresh. I miss these the most since moving back to the US. Nothing compares to fresh peas.

I'm bummed by the disappearance of parsnips in my locale. None of the markets I frequent carry them anymore.
Rutabagas are delicious, by the way, if prepared correctly. So buttery and sweet all on their own.
I've never eaten turnips - just not appealing.
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Old 03-07-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Purplecow View Post
I'm a vegetarian who has never eaten any root vegetable other than carrot, potato, or yam. Wouldn't have the slightest idea what to do with one. They are so ugly just to look at. Also, ever since vegetarianism became popular, the price of vegetables and fruits is comparable to meat. People used to tell me I was lucky I was a vegetarian (because I saved so much money). Not anymore.

So why waste money buying some ugly veggie-critter you just know you'll end up putting in next week's garbage?
What to do with them is pretty basic and simple. Peel, cut to your preference, and cook in your preferred manner. Roasting generally works well for root vegetables/tubers. So does mashing.
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Old 03-07-2018, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,821 posts, read 39,387,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Oh are you in for a treat! Fresh beets are DELICIOUS - robust, filling and sweet!

Roasted beets are very tasty! A few weeks ago, I made Ukrainian style borscht - beet soup. I'm craving it again!

When you do buy those fresh beets, don't throw the greens away! They are very tasty too!
Beets prepared sans pickling are so much better to me than pickled beets...and I like pickled beets.
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Old 03-07-2018, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,821 posts, read 39,387,870 times
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Growing up, our farm had two Montmorency cherry trees at the foot of the lane, both of which have since died. They are a tart, light/bright red cherry, versus the dark purplish sweet cherries typically available in stores. They are EXCELLENT in cherry pies...the first time I ever had a cherry pie NOT baked from cherries from our trees, it was a rude awakening. No comparison.

We also had rhubarb that grew in a patch along the foundation. My grandma would sweeten and slowcook it, stewing it into a sauce much in the same way one makes homemade applesauce. It was amazing still warm, topping vanilla ice cream.

Rhubarb seems to be enjoying a hipster/foodie moment in the sun, though, infusing craft cocktails, and being used in compotes and relishes.
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