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Old 04-02-2018, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,712 posts, read 21,760,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
1. Saint Andre (triple crème)
2. Caprice des Dieux
3. Le Rustique (Camembert; not the Brie)

How do I use them? The only way -- on a baguette.
Those are my 6 favorite cheeses. They all deserve a second mention.

I'll never forget my first ripe Limburger. I turned and babied it for days.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,222 posts, read 25,424,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Those are my 6 favorite cheeses. They all deserve a second mention.

I'll never forget my first ripe Limburger. I turned and babied it for days.
Still laughing... I thought that you'd caught me at bad math.

Y'know, I've never had Limburger. That will change soon.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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A wheel of brie, sprinkled with brown sugar, dried cranberries, and pecans, then lightly baked, is fantastic.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,712 posts, read 21,760,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Still laughing... I thought that you'd caught me at bad math.

Y'know, I've never had Limburger. That will change soon.
I'm the high priestess of bad math--science, even. A frequent question was, "How did you come to that conclusion?"

My mind may work in mysterious ways, but I know what to do with cheese. Buy a good Limburger, don't keep it in plastic, and turn it. All soft ripened cheeses should be flipped at least once a day. A ripe, but young cheese should be soft, spreadable, and not stinky.

You won't love it, but it's worth one try.
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Old 04-02-2018, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
...You won't love it, but it's worth one try.
You're right about that!!! I'm not sure if what I tried was even edible. It smelled like a dead animal rotting away on the highway at noon on a hot summer day. I got past that horrific odor, only to discover that it tasted EXACTLY as it smelled. It took quite some time to recover from that fiasco.

That's the problem with trying something for the first time. I mean, what if your first experience with something new is with a bad interpretation or preparation?
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Old 04-02-2018, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,712 posts, read 21,760,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
You're right about that!!! I'm not sure if what I tried was even edible. It smelled like a dead animal rotting away on the highway at noon on a hot summer day. I got past that horrific odor, only to discover that it tasted EXACTLY as it smelled. It took quite some time to recover from that fiasco.

That's the problem with trying something for the first time. I mean, what if your first experience with something new is with a bad interpretation or preparation?
Dead skunk in the middle of the road? That was a bad piece of cheese. Young, but ripe Limburger is like a wet lamb. It has a distinctive smell, but it doesn't stink. It's better than a wet dog in August.
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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One cheese that has somewhat limited availability (at least, where I am) and also has a pretty regional appeal, but is really quite good is Norwegian Gjetost. Ski Queen is a commonly imported brand, and is usually sold in a red wrapped cube. It is made with goat's milk or a combo of goat and cow milk. It's most easily found in areas that have a significant Scandinavian immigrant culture, here.

It's a brown cheese that is distinctive because the whey is caramelized. It's basically the color of wrapped caramels.
Norwegians cut it with a cheese plane in thin curls,and it is melted on warm toasted bread for a common breakfast treat. I like it any time of day, though. It's an unusual flavor for most people, and unexpected in a cheese. It's got a slight sweetness about it, from the caramelized whey, but isn't a sweet cheese, either...because it's goat cheese, there is a sharp, kind of tangy undertone that cuts the sweetness. It has a slightly waxy consistency, it isn't crumbly. It's not like anything else, really. And it's good. Melty on a warm toasted English muffin is a great way to enjoy it.
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Old 04-03-2018, 03:51 AM
Status: "Can kindness win?" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Here and now.
10,382 posts, read 2,816,810 times
Reputation: 11122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
I really like washed-rind cheeses. They are some of the stinkier varieties. One of my favorites is Stinking Bishop served at room temperature: it oozes out of its thick rind. It's great on water crackers.
This sounds like something I would like to try. Humboldt Fog sounds pretty amazing, too.

It's obviously not washed-rind, but a current favorite of mine is Caveman Blue, from Rogue Creamery.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
One cheese that has somewhat limited availability (at least, where I am) and also has a pretty regional appeal, but is really quite good is Norwegian Gjetost. Ski Queen is a commonly imported brand, and is usually sold in a red wrapped cube. It is made with goat's milk or a combo of goat and cow milk. It's most easily found in areas that have a significant Scandinavian immigrant culture, here.

It's a brown cheese that is distinctive because the whey is caramelized. It's basically the color of wrapped caramels.
Norwegians cut it with a cheese plane in thin curls,and it is melted on warm toasted bread for a common breakfast treat. I like it any time of day, though. It's an unusual flavor for most people, and unexpected in a cheese. It's got a slight sweetness about it, from the caramelized whey, but isn't a sweet cheese, either...because it's goat cheese, there is a sharp, kind of tangy undertone that cuts the sweetness. It has a slightly waxy consistency, it isn't crumbly. It's not like anything else, really. And it's good. Melty on a warm toasted English muffin is a great way to enjoy it.
That sounds well worth trying! I will have to see if I can find it.

Last edited by Catgirl64; 04-03-2018 at 04:09 AM..
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Old 04-03-2018, 04:38 AM
 
11,325 posts, read 5,846,190 times
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Last week, I made a shrimp/paneer saag with baby spinach, sweet onion, garlic, and a splash of half & half. Garam masala spice blend, turmeric, and whole cumin seed. The trick is to sauté the shrimp first with some of the spices and add it at the end so you don’t overcook the shrimp. I don’t cook many things with cheese. Fresh grated Parmesan regiano. Lasagna once in a while. In my world, cheese is mostly an hors d’oeuvre, salad, or sandwich.
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Old 04-03-2018, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,131 posts, read 16,721,272 times
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Brie (or even better Délice de Bourgogne http://https://www.seriouseats.com/2...bourgogne.html) with baguette slices.

Goat cheese on baguette slices, each topped with a basil leaf.

Gloucester with Stilton (layer cake cheese) served with crisp apple slices.

Sometimes I make a cheese-veggie spread out of my yogurt cheese. Finely dice radish, green onion or chives, carrot, etc. and mix with cheese, then refrigerate to firm up. This is great on bagels.

God I love bread and cheese.
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