U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-18-2018, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,113 posts, read 15,431,417 times
Reputation: 24010

Advertisements

This may seem like a dumb thing to focus on, but here goes.

I've lived in basically three different areas in my adult life - Des Moines, Indianapolis, and my hometown in northeast TN. Iowa and Indiana are big ag states, Tennessee is not. Both of the Midwestern areas were bigger and wealthier than where I am in Tennessee.

This seems to translate over into the local grocery selection. When I lived in Des Moines, there were tons of different options - Fareway and HyVee in the mainline grocery segment, Super Target along with Walmart in the hypermarket segment, Whole Foods and Trader Joe's on the upper end, and various ethnics and specialty shops to fill in gaps. There were also Costco and Sam's.

Indianapolis had even more selection. Kroger had several extremely fancy stores called "Kroger Marketplace" that are the best stores I've ever been in. There were even more offerings at the high end - Fresh Thyme, Earthfare (an Asheville based Whole Foods knockoff), and The Fresh Market. Aldi on the low end. Super Target, Meijer, and Walmart on the hypermarket end. There were two Costcos and two Sam's within 10-20 minutes of where I lived.

I moved back to TN two years ago. No Super Target within a hundred miles. For the hypermarkets, it's Walmart only. The area has several mostly rundown Krogers with a poor selection (only one is nice), Aldi (just came in the past couple of years), Sam's, and is otherwise dominated by a regional chain called Food City and Walmart. Food City and Walmart are basically your only choices in most of the smaller towns and even parts of the cities. Prices are high and selection is poor.

Our farmer's markets are downright poor compared to the ones in the Midwest I've been to, even smaller towns. Fairly routine items that grow well here, like raspberries and blackberries, are simply not available. Local meat is hard to track down. There is a good "farm store," but they just sell staples - corn, green beans, cucumbers, and tomatoes. Strawberries, various, squash, and blueberries are occasionally available. If I can't find it here, I'm loading up the 61 qt. cooler and driving to Asheville or Knoxville.

I went to Raleigh a couple of weeks ago. I was basically in food heaven again. Harris-Teeter and Publix are both cheaper than Food City. Selection was much better. Sprouts was terrific. The Carrboro farmers market was amazing.

How important is food selection when you're looking at places?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-18-2018, 11:18 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,065 posts, read 25,964,785 times
Reputation: 39562
I need to look around and see how far I will need to drive for groceries, but I don't need upscale fancy stores with clever decorating and lots of high end prepared food. I cook from scratch and a bag of flour from Walmart is just the same as the same brand of flour from the pretty upscale store ( that costs twice as much). Moving to a new area always involves finding new places to shop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 11:31 AM
 
8,117 posts, read 3,955,249 times
Reputation: 27887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I went to Raleigh a couple of weeks ago. I was basically in food heaven again. Harris-Teeter and Publix are both cheaper than Food City. Selection was much better. Sprouts was terrific. The Carrboro farmers market was amazing.
Raleigh also has a number of CSAs that will deliver great produce directly to your door. Even some varieties that are tough to find in stores.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 11:32 AM
 
11,790 posts, read 16,538,808 times
Reputation: 16605
SO expects breakfast, packed lunch and dinner. I expect him to bring home the bacon with me generally bringing home the grits.
Do I miss DC? Oh yes! Do I miss AL? Oh yes, yes! Then came TX, now there is OK.
If you can relocate based on grocery stores and farmers markets - take your pick.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 11:36 AM
 
1,317 posts, read 3,092,277 times
Reputation: 1441
Default Important things on the list

Grocery Stores are on the list I check whenever I consider a new place. not in any particular order:

1 Grocery stores
2 Pharmacy
3 Target - Kohls - Cato
4 Department stores - Belk, Macy's,
5 Bed Bath & Beyond
6 Tuesday Morning

And a couple of personal "needs"

Chick-Fil-a
Good pizza place
Long Horn - or a good steak place
Good breakfast place
Good Mexican place

Library
Hardware store - not just a big box - on the lines of an Ace or True Value.... they generally have an "old guy" who can tell you how to snake a drain or fix this or that without calling in a professional..

I 'assume" there is a Walmart within 10 miles of everyplace so that's not on the check list. There are other places I look for - not that I can think of off the top of my head.

When I decided to leave Atlanta in 2002, I came up with a list of things that I had to look for... I know I saw it the other day. I'll see if I can find it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 11:43 AM
 
644 posts, read 145,210 times
Reputation: 1303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
This may seem like a dumb thing to focus on, but here goes.

I've lived in basically three different areas in my adult life - Des Moines, Indianapolis, and my hometown in northeast TN. Iowa and Indiana are big ag states, Tennessee is not. Both of the Midwestern areas were bigger and wealthier than where I am in Tennessee.

This seems to translate over into the local grocery selection. When I lived in Des Moines, there were tons of different options - Fareway and HyVee in the mainline grocery segment, Super Target along with Walmart in the hypermarket segment, Whole Foods and Trader Joe's on the upper end, and various ethnics and specialty shops to fill in gaps. There were also Costco and Sam's.

Indianapolis had even more selection. Kroger had several extremely fancy stores called "Kroger Marketplace" that are the best stores I've ever been in. There were even more offerings at the high end - Fresh Thyme, Earthfare (an Asheville based Whole Foods knockoff), and The Fresh Market. Aldi on the low end. Super Target, Meijer, and Walmart on the hypermarket end. There were two Costcos and two Sam's within 10-20 minutes of where I lived.

I moved back to TN two years ago. No Super Target within a hundred miles. For the hypermarkets, it's Walmart only. The area has several mostly rundown Krogers with a poor selection (only one is nice), Aldi (just came in the past couple of years), Sam's, and is otherwise dominated by a regional chain called Food City and Walmart. Food City and Walmart are basically your only choices in most of the smaller towns and even parts of the cities. Prices are high and selection is poor.

Our farmer's markets are downright poor compared to the ones in the Midwest I've been to, even smaller towns. Fairly routine items that grow well here, like raspberries and blackberries, are simply not available. Local meat is hard to track down. There is a good "farm store," but they just sell staples - corn, green beans, cucumbers, and tomatoes. Strawberries, various, squash, and blueberries are occasionally available. If I can't find it here, I'm loading up the 61 qt. cooler and driving to Asheville or Knoxville.

I went to Raleigh a couple of weeks ago. I was basically in food heaven again. Harris-Teeter and Publix are both cheaper than Food City. Selection was much better. Sprouts was terrific. The Carrboro farmers market was amazing.

How important is food selection when you're looking at places?
Perhaps a little unfair to compare grocery store options in Indiananapolis (863,000)
.................................................. ...............................Des Moines (210,000)
.................................................. ...............................Johnson City ( 65,000)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,828 posts, read 39,541,088 times
Reputation: 48654
Because I grew up rurally, and grocery shopping was always an inconvenient production, and it was virtually impossible to "pop out and grab something" you needed at random, I do have a rule of thumb that I would like some type of grocery store of size within a mile or two. But that's really my only hard and fast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 12:04 PM
 
644 posts, read 145,210 times
Reputation: 1303
A good sized grocery store 3.5 miles
A good sized grocery store 4 miles ( different direction)

A great Walmart 8 miles

I am spoiled compared to the area I moved from.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Washington state
4,726 posts, read 2,331,621 times
Reputation: 13845
More than a couple grocery stores with a variety of foods is very important to me. For one thing, if there is more than one or two major stores in the area, there will be competition and that means lower prices. Having access to lower cost foods is as important to me as any other bill I'll be paying.

I do like a large grocery store with a lot of variety, because there are so many recipes I want to try. I remember when I was in the Twin Cities and couldn't find dry salami anywhere. I had to practically go to a specialty store to get it. I'll tell my mom (who lives there) about simple recipes to try and she can't do them because she can't find things like capers or kiwis or things like that.

I love the Farmer's Markets in my area, but they are super expensive. So unless I found one with reasonable prices, I wouldn't really care about them. Especially if I start my own garden.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,212 posts, read 7,522,283 times
Reputation: 17189
I don't care.

With Amazon I can order almost anything I want.

I would be sad to live without Trader Joes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top