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Old 08-13-2018, 11:22 AM
 
472 posts, read 175,622 times
Reputation: 1537

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This is my favorite pork belly recipe. I serve it with Chinese pancakes, hoisin sauce, and scallions. It is so easy to make and tastes great. Remove the skin if it it still intact.

Note: I suggest brushing off the top after removing the salt crust.

https://rasamalaysia.com/chinese-roast-pork/2/
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Old 08-13-2018, 02:09 PM
 
736 posts, read 172,216 times
Reputation: 2067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
From what a sibling says after relocating and living in the UK for decades, the British have a very very different sense about what bacon actually is. One of the Christmas gifts I try to send her each year is "American" style bacon. It never lasts very long in their household. It is one of the only things she still misses and mourns.
She can buy it in England. Its called "streaky bacon". Its only used for garnishing or flavoring and is not popular as an item with eggs, or in sandwiches etc. The English were eating bacon before America was discovered btw.
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Old 08-13-2018, 02:11 PM
 
736 posts, read 172,216 times
Reputation: 2067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Pork is big here but they have never figured out how to produce bacon. So this English guy starts raising pork and proudly announces "we now have bacon". I am thrilled and get 5 lbs. I fry it and it though it has plenty of fat, none melts off. The stuff is hard as a rock and when I try to finely dice it, some won't even cut through. There seems to be a rind, but even without that, this is so tough as to be inedible.

I did some in the slow-cooker according to a recipe for "pork belly" I found online. Now it's curled up and rock hard. I put some uncooked in the freezer, so if anyone has ever run across this, I'd love to hear about it. What a ridiculous waste of money! (wasn't cheap, either)

I got some rich broth from the crock-pot, but that's about it....

Just ask the guy if he also makes streaky bacon. It should be cheaper since it contains less meat per pound.
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Old 08-18-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,013 posts, read 5,791,876 times
Reputation: 10469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Pork is big here but they have never figured out how to produce bacon. So this English guy starts raising pork and proudly announces "we now have bacon". I am thrilled and get 5 lbs. I fry it and it though it has plenty of fat, none melts off. The stuff is hard as a rock and when I try to finely dice it, some won't even cut through. There seems to be a rind, but even without that, this is so tough as to be inedible.

I did some in the slow-cooker according to a recipe for "pork belly" I found online. Now it's curled up and rock hard. I put some uncooked in the freezer, so if anyone has ever run across this, I'd love to hear about it. What a ridiculous waste of money! (wasn't cheap, either)

I got some rich broth from the crock-pot, but that's about it....

Was the crock-pot broth really good and tasty? If so then your bacon won't be a complete waste and can be used in other ways.

What you are describing sounds like the gristly pork belly one gets off a feral hog. It is rock hard like that because it's layered in multiple layers with gristle that looks like fat. It can be just barely possible to cut through it with the sharpest of knives. Your Englishman's hogs are most likely too physically active and being fed the wrong kind of diet for making bacon (and they're probably the wrong kind of hogs for making bacon too). You can't cook gristly bacon like that the same way as you would cook bacon from properly raised and cured pork meat. Gristle doesn't cook up the same way as flesh or fat because gristle is pure, solid, hard cartilage and gelatin.

It's not a loss though if you want tasty pork bits and flavourful lard for putting in rich soups, stews, pork pot pies, pastries, pancakes and the like, if you care to take the time to render all of it first. You will have to cut off the rind (the skin) and toss the rind, it isn't usable unless you want to simmer it all down for hours and hours into concentrated gelatin (which is what I would do but then I have more time and patience than most people, and I have a good medicinal use for the pork gelatin).

Cut up the meat into small cubes, the smaller the better, and in a large cast iron skillet spread a single layer on the bottom of the skillet and slowly render it down, stirring and turning occasionally as it gradually shrinks and begins to brown. Cast iron is best, bar none, for rendering animal fats, especially pork fats. The flesh and gristle will render down into crunchy, hard, flavourful bacon bits which can be drained and allowed to dry, then later can be rehydrated in water to add to other recipes, and the rendered fat (100% pure lard) can be strained and stored to use for anything that requires good, pure, unadulterated homemade lard.

I wouldn't buy any more bacon from that English guy if I was you. If good bacon is hard to come by in your neck of the woods you could check and see if you can get delivery of the Tulip brand of canned bacon that comes from Denmark. I think they export all over the world. Here is a link: Bacon

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 08-18-2018 at 02:00 PM..
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Old 08-18-2018, 02:06 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,013 posts, read 5,791,876 times
Reputation: 10469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Pork is big here but they have never figured out how to produce bacon. So this English guy starts raising pork and proudly announces "we now have bacon". I am thrilled and get 5 lbs. I fry it and it though it has plenty of fat, none melts off. The stuff is hard as a rock and when I try to finely dice it, some won't even cut through. There seems to be a rind, but even without that, this is so tough as to be inedible.

I did some in the slow-cooker according to a recipe for "pork belly" I found online. Now it's curled up and rock hard. I put some uncooked in the freezer, so if anyone has ever run across this, I'd love to hear about it. What a ridiculous waste of money! (wasn't cheap, either)

I got some rich broth from the crock-pot, but that's about it....

Was the crock-pot broth really good and tasty? If so then your bacon won't be a complete waste and can be used in other ways.

What you are describing sounds like the gristly pork belly one gets off a feral hog. It is rock hard like that because it's layered in multiple layers with gristle that looks like fat. It can be just barely possible to cut through it with the sharpest of knives. Your Englishman's hogs are most likely too physically active and being fed the wrong kind of diet for making bacon (and they're probably the wrong kind of hogs for making bacon too). You can't cook gristly bacon like that the same way as you would cook bacon from properly raised and cured pork meat. Gristle doesn't cook up the say way as flesh or fat because gristle is pure, solid, hard cartilage and gelatin.

It's not a loss though if you want pork bits and flavourful lard for putting in soups, stews, pork pot pies, pastries, pancakes and the like, if you care to take the time to render all of it first. You will have to cut off the rind (the skin) and toss the rind, it isn't usable unless you want to simmer it all down for hours and hours into concentrated gelatin (which is what I would do but then I have more time and patience than most people, and I have a good medicinal use for the pork gelatin).

Cut up the meat into small cubes, the smaller the better, and in a large cast iron skillet spread a single layer on the bottom of the skillet and slowly render it down, stirring and turning occasionally as it gradually shrinks and begins to brown. Cast iron is best, bar none, for rendering animal fats, especially pork fats. The flesh and gristle will render down into crunchy, hard, flavourful bacon bits which can be drained and allowed to dry, then later can be rehydrated in water to add to other recipes, and the rendered fat (100% pure lard) can be strained and stored to use for anything that requires good, pure, unadulterated homemade lard.

I wouldn't buy any more bacon from that English guy if I was you. If good bacon is hard to come by in your neck of the woods you could check and see if you can get delivery of the Tulip brand of canned bacon that comes from Denmark. It is REALLY GOOD bacon. I think they export all over the world. Bacon

.
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Old 08-21-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: equator
2,604 posts, read 1,111,397 times
Reputation: 6342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Was the crock-pot broth really good and tasty? If so then your bacon won't be a complete waste and can be used in other ways.

What you are describing sounds like the gristly pork belly one gets off a feral hog. It is rock hard like that because it's layered in multiple layers with gristle that looks like fat. It can be just barely possible to cut through it with the sharpest of knives. Your Englishman's hogs are most likely too physically active and being fed the wrong kind of diet for making bacon (and they're probably the wrong kind of hogs for making bacon too). You can't cook gristly bacon like that the same way as you would cook bacon from properly raised and cured pork meat. Gristle doesn't cook up the say way as flesh or fat because gristle is pure, solid, hard cartilage and gelatin.

It's not a loss though if you want pork bits and flavourful lard for putting in soups, stews, pork pot pies, pastries, pancakes and the like, if you care to take the time to render all of it first. You will have to cut off the rind (the skin) and toss the rind, it isn't usable unless you want to simmer it all down for hours and hours into concentrated gelatin (which is what I would do but then I have more time and patience than most people, and I have a good medicinal use for the pork gelatin).

Cut up the meat into small cubes, the smaller the better, and in a large cast iron skillet spread a single layer on the bottom of the skillet and slowly render it down, stirring and turning occasionally as it gradually shrinks and begins to brown. Cast iron is best, bar none, for rendering animal fats, especially pork fats. The flesh and gristle will render down into crunchy, hard, flavourful bacon bits which can be drained and allowed to dry, then later can be rehydrated in water to add to other recipes, and the rendered fat (100% pure lard) can be strained and stored to use for anything that requires good, pure, unadulterated homemade lard.

I wouldn't buy any more bacon from that English guy if I was you. If good bacon is hard to come by in your neck of the woods you could check and see if you can get delivery of the Tulip brand of canned bacon that comes from Denmark. It is REALLY GOOD bacon. I think they export all over the world. Bacon

.
Thanks for all the thoughtful responses. Especially this one since this is basically what I did. I can't stand waste, so I laboriously cut the rind of EACH slice (it was pre-sliced) of the cooked bacon, then diced up the rest into pea-sized chunks which were quite tasty. I put them with a noodle soup using the broth with mushrooms, cabbage, onions. I did the same with the bacon I put in the slow cooker. The broth really was rich and flavorful. But I don't think I'll order any again.

The Brit is our computer-guru too, so I don't want to criticize him, LOL. And I believe it IS true that the hogs are different here. Probably not corn-fed to "tenderize" them. Some I heard, were fed on papayas. Same with our local beef. Awful taste and tough---they all look like Brahma varieties and just eat wild tough grasses. So we get our beef when someone goes to the "big city" a couple hours away.

The bacon that is in the stores, is VERY lean with no flavor, and super-expensive. Oh well, I guess we can live without bacon.

No, we can't get anything delivered. No mail, no Amazon.
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Old 08-21-2018, 12:21 PM
 
5,156 posts, read 2,992,030 times
Reputation: 17619
The tocino I buy in Puerto Morelos is very good and much cheaper than in the States. Maybe you need to get some Mexicans to make your bacon for you?

I don't know. It's a puzzle like much in Mexico. LOL
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Old 08-21-2018, 01:30 PM
 
1,953 posts, read 752,771 times
Reputation: 7779
The hogs they breed for bacon are not the same as other hogs. Tamworths spring to mind as a bacon hog, but that's a heritage breed. Not sure which commercial breeds they raise for bacon.

But given how hot it is there, I doubt they're raising much in the way of typical USian commercial hogs. Maybe some variety of Guinea hogs, which came from Africa, or other breeds adapted to hot weather. Many such breeds are a lot closer to wild boars than other domesticated hogs. I did note that OSU's breed web pages list NO breeds of swine in South America, just horses, fowl, cattle, and llamas. Oh, and sheep and goats.

Your cattle all look like Brahmas because Brahmas are THE hot weather bovine. Nearly all, if not all, hot weather cattle have a lot of Brahma in them, if they're not just straight Brahma to start with.
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Old 08-23-2018, 03:40 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,545 posts, read 51,750,301 times
Reputation: 82966
Don't know how to cook bacon?
Here is instruction:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BmZtTdzn5k-/

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Old 08-23-2018, 11:51 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,013 posts, read 5,791,876 times
Reputation: 10469
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Don't know how to cook bacon?
Here is instruction:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BmZtTdzn5k-/


Bwahahahahaha !!!! I love that - so funny and so true. I hope that boosts their sales.

.
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