U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-19-2018, 08:43 AM
 
1 posts, read 190 times
Reputation: 25

Advertisements

Greetings! I apologize in advance if this is not the correct place to post this question.

Im planning to open a store in my country which would sell imported cheeses from all over the world! During my research, I stumbled upon this map of various European cheeses:



Id like to know whether these European cheeses that are shown accurately represent the best cheeses from Europe? If not, I would be more than glad to hear some other suggestions.

Cheers!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-19-2018, 10:38 AM
 
7,989 posts, read 3,874,784 times
Reputation: 27378
If your knowledge of European cheeses is limited to a graphic you found on the internet, perhaps you are premature in your desire to open a store. I suggest far more research, even traveling to Europe and visiting cheese makers in various countries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2018, 11:26 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,945 posts, read 16,534,340 times
Reputation: 28725
Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
If your knowledge of European cheeses is limited to a graphic you found on the internet, perhaps you are premature in your desire to open a store. I suggest far more research, even traveling to Europe and visiting cheese makers in various countries.
Hopefully OP is just trying to get an opinion as to whether the relevant countrymen agree that those are regarded as the "best" cheeses in their country.

One can have a broad and deep experiential knowledge of cheese without knowing the general national opinion of a cheese.

For example, Gamalost (a traditional, but aqcuired taste) is considered a famous type of cheese, but many, if not most, Norwegians will reach for the Norvegia (a pleasantly bland, Gouda-like cheese) over Gamalost 9 out of 10 times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2018, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Eureka CA
7,586 posts, read 10,391,890 times
Reputation: 11343
There is no "best". It depends on the individual. I hope you are doing sufficient research on your venture. You can't do it by posting questions to random people on the internet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2018, 01:44 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
8,836 posts, read 8,173,387 times
Reputation: 13347
I don't know about "best," but my favorite French cheese is St. Andre, a triple creme I like to eat with good bread, as Ina would say. Explorateur is another triple creme I like. And Fromager d'Affinois, a double creme.

And from Italy, Parmigiano-Reggiano. Different Gorgonzolas (blue). Pecorino-Romano (sheep's milk). But most people know about those. Not many have had Alta Badia, from the Dolomite Mountains in the northernmost region of Italy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-Andr%C3%A9_cheese

https://www.murrayscheese.com/fromager-daffinois

https://www.cheese.com/alta-badia/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2018, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,144 posts, read 7,469,555 times
Reputation: 17054
I don't know what country you are in but if North America, do not rule out Wisconsin and New York State cheese. Some of the best I've ever had!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2018, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Florida
661 posts, read 140,534 times
Reputation: 1563
Granted, some of those cheeses are strictly controlled in the production in order to be called by certain names, but many are artisan produced and quality differs greatly. Therefore brand name and label should be noted. In France, Papillon makes a roquefort with a black label which we love. They also make a red label that we aren't as fond of. Personally, I think you would need to actually visit and try the offerings from different producers to find the creme de la creme. I'm sure, like prosciutto, some cheeses that are imported to the US have certain production requirements imposed on them by the USDA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2018, 04:24 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,584 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83017
Impossible to answer, there are way more different kinds of cheese in each country. Even this expansive long list is not including them all.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cheeses

Holland makes 437 different types, France around 1,000, Germany 600+, Italy 450+, Spain 150+, etc...

Besides - it's a matter of your personal preference.
I love Limburger, but that might be not something you would want to try.

Ranker could be a good source of info:
https://m.ranker.com/crowdranked-lis...ry-best-cheese

Last edited by elnina; 08-20-2018 at 04:50 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2018, 06:23 AM
 
7,989 posts, read 3,874,784 times
Reputation: 27378
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Impossible to answer, there are way more different kinds of cheese in each country. Even this expansive long list is not including them all.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cheeses

Holland makes 437 different types, France around 1,000, Germany 600+, Italy 450+, Spain 150+, etc...
Exactly. And if someone doesn't realize this, it's probably too soon for them to be thinking about opening a cheese shop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2018, 06:36 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,584 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83017
Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
Exactly. And if someone doesn't realize this, it's probably too soon for them to be thinking about opening a cheese shop.
Right! Real cheese isn't cheap. Customers would want opinion or ask questions - OP needs to know much more about the cheese he is selling. Travel, visit factories and taste would be very helpful to his business. Learn about cheese and wine paring, regions, process, aging etc. That sort of things would make him appear professional.

BTW: what country? If that's an European country, you should ask locals. You will be selling to them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top