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Old 08-26-2018, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
11,242 posts, read 11,646,574 times
Reputation: 17515

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
rusty pots can be scoured out and some of the rust will be gone. Unless the pot is super rusty it is just fine to use.
Soak it in vinegar (acetic acid) for a couple days and the rust will be gone. Muriatic acid is faster, but you have to go to a welding supply shop to find it, and it's dangerous. Come to think of it, a paint store may have muriatic acid. You have to "pickle" galvanized metal to get paint to adhere.

Any grocery store will have vinegar. Just buy a gallon of the cheapest white vinegar on the shelves and leave the metal covered with it until the rust is gone. This works for any rusty object, like scissors, knives, or what have you. Once you clean it up, you can paint the rusty spots with phosphoric acid, which is sold under the trade name of "Rust Reformer." It will keep the rust from reappearing. Follow the directions on the can.
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Old 08-26-2018, 03:42 PM
Status: "watching out" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Eastern Tennessee
2,352 posts, read 1,576,084 times
Reputation: 6023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
I use it every Sunday on top of the stove to simmer a week's supply of kidney beans (roof off) and brown rice (roof on). I'm sure you're familiar with the type of pot, i.e., black metal with white dots. The problem is the roof, or, more specifically, its ceiling. There are little rust spots. The last thing I need in my blood is more iron.
For how many years? Maybe it is worn out.

"little rust spots"

Like grain of salt little or English pea little? If they are truly tiny you are getting more iron from all those beans you eat every week than from the pot lid.
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Old 08-26-2018, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
21,680 posts, read 22,972,150 times
Reputation: 45847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
I use it every Sunday on top of the stove to simmer a week's supply of kidney beans (roof off) and brown rice (roof on). I'm sure you're familiar with the type of pot, i.e., black metal with white dots. The problem is the roof, or, more specifically, its ceiling. There are little rust spots. The last thing I need in my blood is more iron.
Is calling a pot lid a "roof" a regional thing? I've never heard it before and it took me a sec to translate.

If the rust is on the lid, and the lid never touches the food, I don't think I'd scrap the pot just yet.
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Old 08-26-2018, 04:19 PM
 
977 posts, read 369,321 times
Reputation: 2276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
I use it every Sunday on top of the stove to simmer a week's supply of kidney beans (roof off) and brown rice (roof on). I'm sure you're familiar with the type of pot, i.e., black metal with white dots. The problem is the roof, or, more specifically, its ceiling. There are little rust spots. The last thing I need in my blood is more iron.

As a rule in our home ...."If in doubt throw it out"...save time ,and worry, and possible sickness for all that we own or eat.


Life is to short to worry about anything you come in contact with that could harm you. Most stuff you learn about in day to day living. For those things what cause you to doubt (not people!) I pitch and move on.
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Old 08-26-2018, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,114 posts, read 2,939,421 times
Reputation: 7448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Shoot. I thought this was about old MJ that sat around too long.

We put our old rusty cast-iron in a raging bonfire to get the rust off, then seasoned it. But I realize you're talking about enamel....
Yeah, I cannot help but think this thread is someone’s idea of humor. Your pot is fine, enjoy it while you can.
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Old 08-26-2018, 05:06 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,209 posts, read 26,257,686 times
Reputation: 39951
Black metal with white dot? Enamel granite ware? When the enamel chips, they will get rust spots.

Safe to use, but I just bought a very nice heavy weight granite ware chicken roaster, made in the USA, from Walmart. $11. So if the rust spots bother you, buy a new one. Granite ware is not expensive.

It you are cooking with granite ware, be a bit careful with it. If you slam it against anything hard, the enamel will chip.

Veering wildly off topic, the granite ware turkey roasting pans do the best job on the thanksgiving turkey.
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Old 08-26-2018, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
5,978 posts, read 7,217,414 times
Reputation: 14387
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Black metal with white dot? Enamel granite ware? When the enamel chips, they will get rust spots.

Safe to use, but I just bought a very nice heavy weight granite ware chicken roaster, made in the USA, from Walmart. $11. So if the rust spots bother you, buy a new one. Granite ware is not expensive.

It you are cooking with granite ware, be a bit careful with it. If you slam it against anything hard, the enamel will chip.

Veering wildly off topic, the granite ware turkey roasting pans do the best job on the thanksgiving turkey.
You win! Enamel granite ware--now I kind kind of picture it, but most often it's a roasting pan.
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Old 08-26-2018, 05:28 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,209 posts, read 26,257,686 times
Reputation: 39951
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrah View Post
You win! Enamel granite ware--now I kind kind of picture it, but most often it's a roasting pan.
I've got granite ware round turkey roaster, rectangular turkey roaster, chicken roaster, large stock pot, smaller stock pot, campfire coffee pot. ( campfire coffee pot is a popular item). I've seen granite ware sauce pans.

I've got the good coffee pot that we use when camping, and another old one with a hole in the bottom that has geraniums growing in it.

Granite ware comes in black and also in blue.
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Old 08-26-2018, 06:21 PM
 
1,957 posts, read 790,308 times
Reputation: 7812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
Soak it in vinegar (acetic acid) for a couple days and the rust will be gone. Muriatic acid is faster, but you have to go to a welding supply shop to find it, and it's dangerous. Come to think of it, a paint store may have muriatic acid. You have to "pickle" galvanized metal to get paint to adhere.

Any grocery store will have vinegar. Just buy a gallon of the cheapest white vinegar on the shelves and leave the metal covered with it until the rust is gone. This works for any rusty object, like scissors, knives, or what have you. Once you clean it up, you can paint the rusty spots with phosphoric acid, which is sold under the trade name of "Rust Reformer." It will keep the rust from reappearing. Follow the directions on the can.
Muriatic acid is commonly available at any pool supply and most hardware stores. Not saying one should run out and buy some for this purpose, but it's out there. It's commonly used for cleaning concrete surfaces, such as getting that nasty oil stain off your driveway.

https://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/infmur.html

BTW it's just a fancy name for hydrochloric acid, so you get some idea of how dangerous this can be.

And btw, I first recognized and named this pot as enamelware. SO I WIN!

*doing victory dance* HOOP there it is HOOP there it is
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Old 08-26-2018, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,385 posts, read 12,795,518 times
Reputation: 25400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
Soak it in vinegar (acetic acid) for a couple days and the rust will be gone. Muriatic acid is faster, but you have to go to a welding supply shop to find it, and it's dangerous. Come to think of it, a paint store may have muriatic acid. You have to "pickle" galvanized metal to get paint to adhere.

Any grocery store will have vinegar. Just buy a gallon of the cheapest white vinegar on the shelves and leave the metal covered with it until the rust is gone. This works for any rusty object, like scissors, knives, or what have you. Once you clean it up, you can paint the rusty spots with phosphoric acid, which is sold under the trade name of "Rust Reformer." It will keep the rust from reappearing. Follow the directions on the can.
For goodness sake, don’t use murietic acid on pots that cook food.

I like the idea of locating a spare lid at the Goodwill. Our GW must have 100 various lids. The lid does not have to match; it just has to fit your pot.
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