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Old 08-28-2018, 09:55 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
2,952 posts, read 1,967,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
The last time I made butter from cream it got rancid in less than a week.
It's interesting you bring that up. I watched a TV show, "Good Eats" with Alton Brown. He claims that butter is wrapped in foil or salted to prevent this. The salted part I can understand, the foil part I'm not so sure about. I do buy the regular sticks of butter and they are wrapped in what appears to be wax paper. Maybe the same effect?

Here's a bit more.
https://www.myrecipes.com/extracrispy/can-butter-go-bad
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Old 08-28-2018, 10:12 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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You can make your own butter???
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Old 08-28-2018, 10:32 AM
 
Location: northern New England
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I have a Donvier ice cream maker so I would make ice cream with it.
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Old 08-28-2018, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Washington state
4,730 posts, read 2,336,406 times
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I've heard salting butter will keep it from going bad, but I find I salt mine far less than the salted brands I get in the store. You also have to wash the butter after it's made. I run mine under cold water for at least 5 minutes, squeezing and squeezing to get all the excess liquid out. Leaving in too much of that will also make butter go rancid quickly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
You can make your own butter???
Of course! It's a little labor intensive, but if you've got nothing else to do while you're watching a TV show...

When I was volunteering at the food bank, one time they had a bunch of cartons of cream that were donated. I don't think more than a couple cartons were taken and the cream was going to expire that day, so it had to be tossed. I asked if I could take them home instead and I spent all evening making butter from that cream. I had butter for weeks.

Cream is expensive. I can't see the point of throwing it out.

When I was still working and could afford it, I went to a store that had about 6 different kinds of cream. I bought one of each kind and made butter from them to compare them. You'd be surprised at how different the creams are. One cream in a pint would barely make a quarter pound of butter and another one would make almost almost double that. The difference in taste was noticeable, too.
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Old 08-29-2018, 02:02 AM
 
488 posts, read 340,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
The last time I made butter from cream it got rancid in less than a week.
You obviously didn't wash the butter very well to remove the extra buttermilk. You're supposed to rinse and knead the blob of butter under cold water until the water runs clear. It will keep for about 5 or 6 weeks if you do it correctly.

About once a year I make butter, using my KitchenAid stand mixer. It's easy to do, but it's a messy job. I really need to be in the mood for it. You simply pour the cream in the bowl and whip it with the whisk attachment for about 10 minutes. --But you should have a splatter guard for your mixer, especially for the final 2 or 3 minutes. As the cream begins to harden into a clump of butter around the whisk, it will shed the buttermilk and sling it all over the kitchen. If you don't have a splatter guard, you can cover the mixer with a kitchen towel to catch the flying buttermilk. (I learned the hard way: The first time I made butter this way I was scrubbing buttermilk off the kitchen walls and cabinets for about 2 months. )

As I mentioned above, you then wash and knead the butter under cold water to remove as much of the extra buttermilk as you can. The extra buttermilk lurking inside the butter will make it go rancid quickly. The buttermilk left in the mixing bowl is real buttermilk, which in nothing like the stuff you buy in the store. Homemade buttermilk looks like watered-down milk. Store bought buttermilk is 2% milk that has been cultured with a strain of lactic acid to make it sour.

But it's not very economical to make your own butter. One pint of cream only yields about a stick, or a half cup, of butter. You need at least 4 pints of cream to make a pound. In the end, homemade butter probably costs at least $3 or $4 more per pound to produce than any butter you buy in the store.

It's cheaper and easier to buy it, but homemade butter is a treat.

Last edited by RDM66; 08-29-2018 at 02:23 AM..
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Old 08-29-2018, 04:37 AM
 
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I saw something years ago......they heated the butter to a liquid then poured in ice cube tray and froze.....after frozen solid they placed the butter cubes in a Ziploc bag...and stored in freezer..
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Old 08-29-2018, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Washington state
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Actually, the milk left over after making the butter is skim milk, because you've taken all the fat out of it.

I usually make butter by first letting the cream (heavy cream by the label) come to room temp. Then I put it in a small Tupperware bowl (filling it about half full) with a lid on it and shake it until I don't hear it slosh anymore. At that point, I start to just beat it with a fork. In about five minutes, the butter starts to form.

When I've got as much out of the cream as I can get, I rinse it under cold water until it's clear, as RDM said. I salt it it and roll it in a ball and what I don't use right away, I put it in a freezer bag and freeze it. The liquid left over is the skim milk and usually I just pour that down the drain. I don't drink milk and as the fat is all out of it, there's no reason to use it in cooking anything. Good cream will allow you a larger proportion of butter to liquid.

It's labor intensive doing it this way, but sometimes I just like to have something for my hands to do while I'm watching some TV show. And I hate sewing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
I saw something years ago......they heated the butter to a liquid then poured in ice cube tray and froze.....after frozen solid they placed the butter cubes in a Ziploc bag...and stored in freezer..
The problem with melting the butter is that 1) you're doing extra work - you can freeze it just as it is and 2) butter will separate when it's heated and it might freeze that way if you haven't been stirring it enough while it melts.
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Old 08-29-2018, 08:53 PM
 
2,729 posts, read 990,259 times
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Room temperature butter can be put in ice cube trays with a little effort and no separating. I wouldn't be able to resist the urge to add in some herbs and other flavors and roll it in wax paper so I could slice off tasty pats to use on every single thing - especially if it was fresh butter.
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Old 08-29-2018, 08:58 PM
 
7,634 posts, read 8,045,292 times
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Kindergarten children have been doing this for years (besides butter churns). I can write down the words for some Making Butter Songs for you, if you like, to sing while you shake the container. They take turns shaking the container. It's funny to watch them.

Then you spread the "butter" on some crackers and afternoon snack is served.
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Old 08-29-2018, 10:13 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
13,078 posts, read 21,233,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
You obviously didn't wash the butter very well to remove the extra buttermilk. You're supposed to rinse and knead the blob of butter under cold water until the water runs clear. It will keep for about 5 or 6 weeks if you do it correctly.

About once a year I make butter, using my KitchenAid stand mixer. It's easy to do, but it's a messy job. I really need to be in the mood for it. You simply pour the cream in the bowl and whip it with the whisk attachment for about 10 minutes. --But you should have a splatter guard for your mixer, especially for the final 2 or 3 minutes. As the cream begins to harden into a clump of butter around the whisk, it will shed the buttermilk and sling it all over the kitchen. If you don't have a splatter guard, you can cover the mixer with a kitchen towel to catch the flying buttermilk. (I learned the hard way: The first time I made butter this way I was scrubbing buttermilk off the kitchen walls and cabinets for about 2 months. )

As I mentioned above, you then wash and knead the butter under cold water to remove as much of the extra buttermilk as you can. The extra buttermilk lurking inside the butter will make it go rancid quickly. The buttermilk left in the mixing bowl is real buttermilk, which in nothing like the stuff you buy in the store. Homemade buttermilk looks like watered-down milk. Store bought buttermilk is 2% milk that has been cultured with a strain of lactic acid to make it sour.

But it's not very economical to make your own butter. One pint of cream only yields about a stick, or a half cup, of butter. You need at least 4 pints of cream to make a pound. In the end, homemade butter probably costs at least $3 or $4 more per pound to produce than any butter you buy in the store.

It's cheaper and easier to buy it, but homemade butter is a treat.
It was about 4 oz. of butter, and I was fifteen years old, but thanks. I bookmarked your post if I ever want to feel like Laura Ingalls. In the meantime, I will stick with the bulk size packages of Irish Kerrygold from Costco which require no kneading washing or fussing.
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