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Old 08-28-2018, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,181 posts, read 16,748,016 times
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One of these years I'm going to buy a dwarf lemon tree and plant it in a pot. I'll have to move it into the garage several times per winter to keep it alive. At least I think that would be enough, maybe the house...
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Old 08-28-2018, 09:24 PM
DKM
 
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
2,060 posts, read 678,373 times
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My Lisbon lemons are pretty much done for the season. Fortunately they are only out of season about 6 or 7 weeks a year so by October they will be back.
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Old 08-29-2018, 01:27 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,133 posts, read 2,225,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by npz View Post
I'm just curious, given recent reports of lemon shortages. As of end of August, how much is a single lemon where you live? And where are you buying them?
At my main source of lemons, a large warehouse discounter, they have risen in price over the last month, from 33 cents, to 53 cents, for the small size. They are also smaller and less ripe. But limes are still 28 cents there and juicier, so I'm shifting to them for the time being.

I used to be able to get very nice, seedless lemons, from a regional discount grocery store. They were very juicy and flavorful and not having to dodge those seeds was great. But I don't find the seedless ones anywhere these days. Possibly, the variety that is seedless, may not be as prolific a producer, as those with seeds. A difference in crop yields and profitability, can drive some varieties of fruit and vegetables out of the market. I wonder if the seedless ones can still be found in other regions?
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Old 08-29-2018, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Washington state
4,697 posts, read 2,312,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chint View Post
That's interesting, I didn't know lemon trees could be coppiced.


I for one have no idea how much our lemons cost - I just buy them. If I look at a receipt its only usually items $10 or more that jump out. I can't be the only one.
What is coppiced?
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Old 08-29-2018, 08:47 AM
 
800 posts, read 182,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
What is coppiced?
Its a form of tree pruning - only some species can withstand it. You cut the tree trunk down low - and certain species, e.g. some willows and lindens will sprout back multiple shoots around the periphery of the low cut trunk. In the old days it was a great way of getting a regular big crop of willow sticks for fences, furniture, and many other uses. Regular coppiced trees can also outlast there non-coppiced equivalents. In the picture below the trunk is cut fairly high, but in some species you can cut nearly to the ground:


https://www.gapphotos.com/images/Lar...49/0549427.jpg


It doesn't have much of a history in the US though. Pollarding is also rare here, but I've been doing it to keep some of my trees under control and not get too large.

Last edited by Beretta; 09-02-2018 at 09:32 AM.. Reason: copyright; please post links to images only
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Old 08-29-2018, 03:43 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
13,056 posts, read 21,185,152 times
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Having lived in Europe for a number of years and being involved with agriculture, I am familiar with both methods described. Especially pollarding, very helpful with pear and plum trees.

When I bought my home twenty years ago, there was a mature apricot tree in the backyard that looked like it had almost never been pruned, or pruned poorly. The first year the product was just a handful of fruit. I pollarded the tree, and the next fruit season the tree bore about five-six buckets of fruit.
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Old 08-29-2018, 05:22 PM
 
Location: The South
4,553 posts, read 3,179,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by npz View Post
I'm just curious, given recent reports of lemon shortages. As of end of August, how much is a single lemon where you live? And where are you buying them?
I bought two nice lemons Monday for $0.68 each at Walmart. In this area, that is about the cheapest(Kroger,Publix,Ingles).
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Old 08-29-2018, 06:39 PM
 
13,727 posts, read 22,861,903 times
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I have been paying about 0.50 per lemon ... imported from Chile.
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Washington state
4,697 posts, read 2,312,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chint View Post
Its a form of tree pruning - only some species can withstand it. You cut the tree trunk down low - and certain species, e.g. some willows and lindens will sprout back multiple shoots around the periphery of the low cut trunk. In the old days it was a great way of getting a regular big crop of willow sticks for fences, furniture, and many other uses. Regular coppiced trees can also outlast there non-coppiced equivalents. In the picture below the trunk is cut fairly high, but in some species you can cut nearly to the ground:





It doesn't have much of a history in the US though. Pollarding is also rare here, but I've been doing it to keep some of my trees under control and not get too large.
Thank you for the info. My tree was cut much lower to the ground than the ones in the pictures. I always thought someone had just tried to chop it down and it sprouted all those branches by itself.
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Old 08-30-2018, 10:32 AM
 
800 posts, read 182,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Thank you for the info. My tree was cut much lower to the ground than the ones in the pictures. I always thought someone had just tried to chop it down and it sprouted all those branches by itself.


Perhaps they did. It could easily be an accidental coppicing! Glad to see it survived and is giving you fruit.
Like the poster above who pollarded his apricot tree, these methods can sometimes rejuvenate a tree.
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