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Old 09-10-2018, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,738 posts, read 21,787,854 times
Reputation: 27806

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I prefer Montreal bagels over NYC bagels. Theyíre much smaller so the texture is better. St Viateur is the best sesame bagel Iíve ever had. Thereís a bagel place in Granville Island, Vancouver who trained in Montreal and comes close. Iíve tried making my own several times and gave up.

Einsteinís is awful. At my girlfriendís place, a bakery storefront walking distance gets bagels trucked in from Brooklyn every morning. Not as good as hot out of the oven but real bagels.

Someone else said baguette. Yep. I canít duplicate a real French baguette, either. Itís unusual to find a US bakery that comes close.
I haven't had a New York bagel in decades. I can't find them. A New York bagel isn't a big bagel, it's one that has been dipped in a lye solution before cooking and baking. They don't often get the water bath these days, either. They're baked in bagel ovens which puff steam at them. The taste isn't the same.

The New York bagel of the 1960s was the size of a doughnut, dipped, floated, then baked. Maybe it was hot water, dip, then bake. I have no idea. I just know that I haven't had a great bagel in a very long time.

https://www.thekitchn.com/expert-bag...er-tour-203288
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Old 09-10-2018, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,738 posts, read 21,787,854 times
Reputation: 27806
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
When I make this, I use the Joy of Cooking recipe. It is really, really good. Use good cheese and top with crumbled Cheeze Its.

But I donít make it now because of the carbs thing.
Adding more cheese cancels out the noodle carbs. You can always add bacon. That way, your body doesn't even know that you ate macaroni.
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Old 09-10-2018, 10:12 PM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,311 posts, read 50,576,723 times
Reputation: 60240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I haven't had a New York bagel in decades. I can't find them. A New York bagel isn't a big bagel, it's one that has been dipped in a lye solution before cooking and baking. They don't often get the water bath these days, either. They're baked in bagel ovens which puff steam at them. The taste isn't the same.

The New York bagel of the 1960s was the size of a doughnut, dipped, floated, then baked. Maybe it was hot water, dip, then bake. I have no idea. I just know that I haven't had a great bagel in a very long time.

https://www.thekitchn.com/expert-bag...er-tour-203288
Never heard that before. Hmm.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:36 AM
 
705 posts, read 402,989 times
Reputation: 2371
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I'm not going to argue with anyone about taste, as tastes differ and I've never tried Stouffer's lasagna, but what on earth were you doing that made it take 3 hours to make a lasagna?? It takes me less than 20 minutes.
Takes me two days to make lasagna. Sauce cooks all day, on day one. Assemble sauce, noodles, Ricotta and Parmigiano-Reggiano and fresh spinach, more sauce, layer of mozzarella, keep layering until pan is full. Bake for about an hour and a half. Rest for half an hour to 45 minutes.
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Old 09-11-2018, 05:03 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
184 posts, read 34,584 times
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I've never made lasagna in 30 minutes either. Seems like the only way you could do that would be to buy premade sauce, grated cheese, etc. If you have ground beef or sausage, seems like even 20 minutes would be pushing it to get the meat cooked and the lasagna put together. To me, if you buy everything premade, might as well buy frozen lasagna and just stick it in the oven.
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Old 09-11-2018, 06:03 AM
 
Location: SC
1,877 posts, read 1,041,545 times
Reputation: 3007
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I'm not going to argue with anyone about taste, as tastes differ and I've never tried Stouffer's lasagna, but what on earth were you doing that made it take 3 hours to make a lasagna?? It takes me less than 20 minutes.
I made the sauce from scratch. Preparing and cooking down tomato sauce takes a while. Of course, baking the lasagna takes HOW LONG? That was around an hour.
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:54 AM
 
5,509 posts, read 3,365,333 times
Reputation: 13950
Quote:
Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
I made the sauce from scratch. Preparing and cooking down tomato sauce takes a while. Of course, baking the lasagna takes HOW LONG? That was around an hour.
I don't count baking time! However long it is makes no difference as I don't have to hang around watching something bake.

I do buy a jar of sauce to start with, so I suppose that's "cheating" and doesn't count as making lasagna from scratch. However, unless you have your own tomato plants and the tomatoes are ripe right now, i don't see a lot of difference between taking canned or jarred or frozen tomatoes and then cooking them down, and using a jar of sauce. I would certainly never buy fresh supermarket tomatoes and make sauce with them; they're no good to begin with.

I brown the meat (sausage or ground beef or both), while chopping some onions and garlic; throw those in with the meat. Add the jar of sauce and maybe some herbs if it seems to need it. Add a can of tomato sauce if it looks like it won't be enough. Simmer for a few minutes while I mix egg with ricotta and slice mozzarella cheese.

Then, it goes like this: 1/3 of the sauce in a pan, 3 uncooked lasagna noodles (not the "no-boil" kind--just regular ones), all of the ricotta, half the mozzarella, 1/3 more sauce, 3 more noodles, rest of the sauce, top with the rest of the mozzarella. We like our lasagna less noodly.

So, yeah--maybe 20 minutes to assemble. What can I say? My family likes it. And just because I don't have two days to prepare one meal doesn't mean I need to resort to frozen dinners.
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,288 posts, read 1,043,745 times
Reputation: 7596
Pizza. never can get a good pizza from my oven.

I make pretty good croissants but it's just time consuming.
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,288 posts, read 1,043,745 times
Reputation: 7596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I haven't had a New York bagel in decades. I can't find them. A New York bagel isn't a big bagel, it's one that has been dipped in a lye solution before cooking and baking. They don't often get the water bath these days, either. They're baked in bagel ovens which puff steam at them. The taste isn't the same.

The New York bagel of the 1960s was the size of a doughnut, dipped, floated, then baked. Maybe it was hot water, dip, then bake. I have no idea. I just know that I haven't had a great bagel in a very long time.

https://www.thekitchn.com/expert-bag...er-tour-203288
We actually have one place in Philly that still makes bagels that way. I'm from Manhattan and grew up on NYC bagels but gotta tell you I do like the more average bagel.
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Old 09-11-2018, 11:38 AM
 
Location: SC
1,877 posts, read 1,041,545 times
Reputation: 3007
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I don't count baking time! However long it is makes no difference as I don't have to hang around watching something bake.

I do buy a jar of sauce to start with, so I suppose that's "cheating" and doesn't count as making lasagna from scratch. However, unless you have your own tomato plants and the tomatoes are ripe right now, i don't see a lot of difference between taking canned or jarred or frozen tomatoes and then cooking them down, and using a jar of sauce. I would certainly never buy fresh supermarket tomatoes and make sauce with them; they're no good to begin with.

I brown the meat (sausage or ground beef or both), while chopping some onions and garlic; throw those in with the meat. Add the jar of sauce and maybe some herbs if it seems to need it. Add a can of tomato sauce if it looks like it won't be enough. Simmer for a few minutes while I mix egg with ricotta and slice mozzarella cheese.

Then, it goes like this: 1/3 of the sauce in a pan, 3 uncooked lasagna noodles (not the "no-boil" kind--just regular ones), all of the ricotta, half the mozzarella, 1/3 more sauce, 3 more noodles, rest of the sauce, top with the rest of the mozzarella. We like our lasagna less noodly.

So, yeah--maybe 20 minutes to assemble. What can I say? My family likes it. And just because I don't have two days to prepare one meal doesn't mean I need to resort to frozen dinners.
To each their own.
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