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Old 09-04-2018, 11:47 AM
 
8,080 posts, read 3,903,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I suppose so. As well as the fact that table settings, since time immemorial, have included glass wear, although that could be just a reserve water in case of choking or something unsavory being served (to wash it down). The cups and saucers could be for dessert coffee, which I'd go along with.
You really think place settings had a glass in case the food sucked? LOL

Place settings often included numerous glasses. Drink has long accompanied meals.
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Some types of foods are well complimented by a properly paired drink:

Rare steak with red wine

Waffles and maple syrup with milk.

Burgers and fries with soda.

Otherwise, I prefer water, sparkling or still.
I'm pretty sure no one ever drank a 64 oz. Big Gulp (American invention) of red wine with a rare steak. If so, the steak was wasted!

And, actually, the original combination in the 1950s was burger and fries with a milkshake or malt. More a dessert than a beverage?
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:11 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
460 posts, read 144,116 times
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95% of the time I just drink water, both at home or dining out. Sometimes I'll drink warm herbal tea or unsweetened sparkling water w/ a lime but that's about it. No Starbucks or soda for me...too much sugar. I don't even drink alcohol. I don't care if some consider it "unusual" ... I'd rather keep that extra money in my wallet than wasting it on added sugar and calories.
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:18 PM
 
5,516 posts, read 3,370,127 times
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I don't drink anything during meals and don't serve water or any other drinks to my family during meals.

At a restaurant, we usually each have a glass of water just because the server asks what we'd like to drink and it seems rude to say "Nothing." But the idea that some people need a drink to wash down their food is something that never even occurred to me.
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
7,790 posts, read 5,356,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I don't drink anything during meals and don't serve water or any other drinks to my family during meals.

At a restaurant, we usually each have a glass of water just because the server asks what we'd like to drink and it seems rude to say "Nothing." But the idea that some people need a drink to wash down their food is something that never even occurred to me.
Same.
I NEVER drink anything with my meals.
I try to remind myself to give my kids a glass of water with theirs that way the option is there, but more often than not, the glass is ignored while they eat and is left on the table after. Or they drink it after they've eaten.
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:34 PM
 
8,080 posts, read 3,903,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I don't drink anything during meals and don't serve water or any other drinks to my family during meals.

At a restaurant, we usually each have a glass of water just because the server asks what we'd like to drink and it seems rude to say "Nothing." But the idea that some people need a drink to wash down their food is something that never even occurred to me.
How is it rude to say that you don't want a drink? The waiter would probably appreciate not having to bring glasses of water if you're not going to drink them.
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:37 PM
 
7,100 posts, read 3,795,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
How is it rude to say that you don't want a drink? The waiter would probably appreciate not having to bring glasses of water if you're not going to drink them.
I think it'd be awkward to just sit there waiting empty-handed until the waiter came back again to take your order. Of course, if all at the table are in agreement that no beverages are wanted, you could just proceed?
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:42 PM
 
8,080 posts, read 3,903,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I think it'd be awkward to just sit there waiting empty-handed until the waiter came back again to take your order. Of course, if all at the table are in agreement that no beverages are wanted, you could just proceed?
I don't think it's awkward at all, even if the table isn't in agreement. Just simply say "I don't need a drink, thank you."
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Old 09-04-2018, 05:16 PM
 
11,099 posts, read 6,601,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I don't feel the need -- or seem to have the time or the room -- for a 64 oz. (or whatever it is) beverage.
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I'm pretty sure no one ever drank a 64 oz. Big Gulp (American invention) of red wine with a rare steak.
Why do you seem to think people are required to drink 64 oz if they choose to have a drink with their meal?

I typically have a glass of water with dinner. My cups are all pint glasses, so I'm typically drinking about 16 oz with dinner. I like to have a drink when I'm eating, but I wouldn't refill my cup 4 times during a meal.

At restaurants, I tend to have my cup refilled 2 or 3 times, but with the amount of ice being used, it's probably only about 24 oz of liquid.
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Old 09-04-2018, 05:27 PM
 
5,516 posts, read 3,370,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
How is it rude to say that you don't want a drink? The waiter would probably appreciate not having to bring glasses of water if you're not going to drink them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I think it'd be awkward to just sit there waiting empty-handed until the waiter came back again to take your order. Of course, if all at the table are in agreement that no beverages are wanted, you could just proceed?
Awkward is a better word than rude. Servers expect to bring you something. When we would go out to eat with my father-in-law and he was asked what he'd like to drink, he always said, "Nothing." Then the server would say "No water?" or "How about water?" and he'd repeat, "Nothing. No water, no fluids" and the server would say, "Oh, okay."

After sitting through this exchange about 65 times, I really started wishing he would just say "Water" the first time. Someone at the table would have drunk it.
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