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Old 09-10-2018, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,706 posts, read 20,456,636 times
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I love cilantro but absolutely hate kale. Tastes horribly bitter to me. Guess I got the pro-cilantro, anti-kale genes :-)

Ditto for the seaweed stuff they wrap sushi in. Gag!

It does make you wonder if genes play a role.
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Old 09-11-2018, 04:02 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
9,409 posts, read 5,202,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Cilantro is finicky. Tends to bolt in warm weather too...had some this year and it was just ok, never really lush and green.

This has been my experience, in the hot weather it turns to seed (coriander). I found this odd as it's so prevalent in Mexican dishes, how does that work?
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:20 AM
 
723 posts, read 494,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
This has been my experience, in the hot weather it turns to seed (coriander). I found this odd as it's so prevalent in Mexican dishes, how does that work?

There are many Mexican regions that are not hot all year round, thus suitable for cilantro growth. Also, many Mexican dishes, similar to Vietnamese dishes (from another hot weather region), use culantro in the original recipes. Culantro is native to Mexico and other hotter regions, and thrives in more tropical climates.

Here in the US, cilantro is more widely available, and thus probably substituted for culantro in many dishes. This gives many the impression that it is an original (not substitute) ingredient.

Funny enough, I think culantro may have been used as a substitute in dishes such as pho, for another similar tasting herb, the Vietnamese coriander (rau răm).

So for all us cilantro-loving folks, we actually have 3 similar tasting herbs to choose from: cilantro, culantro, and Vietnamese coriander. Yay!
(These last two may be grown as substitutes for those living in regions more susceptible to early cilantro bolting. But they are tasty in their own right, as well.)

Last edited by mingna; 09-11-2018 at 07:47 AM..
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:29 AM
 
723 posts, read 494,473 times
Reputation: 1014
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I love cilantro but absolutely hate kale. Tastes horribly bitter to me. Guess I got the pro-cilantro, anti-kale genes :-)

Ditto for the seaweed stuff they wrap sushi in. Gag!

It does make you wonder if genes play a role.
Funny, I had a conversation with a stranger about this very issue at the supermarket 2 days ago. I suggested she try selecting younger, fresh-looking leaves. The bitterness may be due to age.

If it's still too bitter to be eaten raw, perhaps it could be used in a strongly flavored soup.
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:52 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
2,901 posts, read 1,928,267 times
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If I want to keep it fresh for the longest time possible, the absolute best way (I've tried many) is to completely wrap in aluminum foil. Believe it or not, this method will keep it fresh over a week. Make sure it's tightly wrapped. Do not wash before wrapping it. If I want to use it within a few days (up to 5), a simple plastic produce bag in the veggie drawer of the fridge will suffice. Sticking it in water will also keep it fresh but if you are planning to use it within a few days, there is no need.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Midwest
3,697 posts, read 6,712,673 times
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Cilantro is grody to the maxx and should be thrown out as soon as you get it home from the market!

You'll thank me later, believe me!
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:48 PM
 
3,321 posts, read 3,562,039 times
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I've tried keeping basil on the counter in water, both covered and uncovered. No luck. Some leaves still dry out and go limp, others turn black, a couple will last a couple of days. So I've tried cutting it and freezing it. I did the same with some parsley. I don't know how well it works, I haven't tried the parsley yet, but I put some of the basil into home made tomato soup on Sunday, and it's STILL pretty tasty!
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:54 PM
 
3,321 posts, read 3,562,039 times
Reputation: 4119
Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
If I want to keep it fresh for the longest time possible, the absolute best way (I've tried many) is to completely wrap in aluminum foil. Believe it or not, this method will keep it fresh over a week. Make sure it's tightly wrapped. Do not wash before wrapping it. If I want to use it within a few days (up to 5), a simple plastic produce bag in the veggie drawer of the fridge will suffice. Sticking it in water will also keep it fresh but if you are planning to use it within a few days, there is no need.
I do this with celery. Keeps forever. Cut the end off, wrap it tightly in foil. It's easy to get out just one stalk that way too.
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Old 09-11-2018, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,119 posts, read 16,713,055 times
Reputation: 24595
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs.cool View Post
I've tried keeping basil on the counter in water, both covered and uncovered. No luck. Some leaves still dry out and go limp, others turn black, a couple will last a couple of days. So I've tried cutting it and freezing it. I did the same with some parsley. I don't know how well it works, I haven't tried the parsley yet, but I put some of the basil into home made tomato soup on Sunday, and it's STILL pretty tasty!
Hmmm... Iím mystified at the basil problems, Iíve been rooting basil cuttings in a glass for years rather than buying more than one basil plant per season. I have noticed it does much better in a sunny window. At most, perhaps 1 out of 4 or 5 stems will fail to thrive and wilt instead.

Is your kitchen really dark? Are you cutting the stem on an angle?

I have not had any luck with Italian parsley with this method.
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Old 09-11-2018, 09:10 PM
 
6,121 posts, read 3,316,354 times
Reputation: 13007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dwatted Wabbit View Post
Cilantro is grody to the maxx and should be thrown out as soon as you get it home from the market!

You'll thank me later, believe me!
So, you're one of those with the genetic defect!
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