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Old 09-09-2018, 07:22 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
176 posts, read 32,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogboa View Post
I bought 5 lbs of hot last year, had to use them sparingly in my homemade salsa. The ones I bought here were $1.29 LB, both hot and mild. The mild are pushing my wife's tolerance level.

Actually, I looked back and we bought medium last year, and, yes, the mediums were definitely pushing my tolerance level.
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Old 09-09-2018, 07:36 AM
 
486 posts, read 185,351 times
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These would not be considered hot to someone accustomed to eating Scotch Bonnet peppers. Probably quite mild in comparison. They do however lend themselves well to roasting.
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Florida
654 posts, read 138,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlguy44 View Post
These would not be considered hot to someone accustomed to eating Scotch Bonnet peppers. Probably quite mild in comparison. They do however lend themselves well to roasting.
And they have a distinct flavor from the Big Jim varieties grown elsewhere. Probably wouldn't be hot to someone that eats Naga Vipers either.
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:05 AM
 
486 posts, read 185,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogboa View Post
And they have a distinct flavor from the Big Jim varieties grown elsewhere. Probably wouldn't be hot to someone that eats Naga Vipers either.
No, they aren't!
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,704 posts, read 9,094,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Living 7 years in NM we got addicted to them and used to buy them already roasted from the super markets. They were cheap, good and very easy to use in so many ways. Since moving to AR we have purchased them a few years from one of our local markets but we have had to roast them ourselves. Last year one of the markets did the roasting. Because we are lovers of very hot, hot, we choose the hot ones. Well, the guy told me they were extremely hot but I blew him off. What does a guy living in NWA know about really hot. long story, short $15 worth of hath chili went into the trash. He knew more than big mouth here knew.

This year we didn't get as many in the stores and they were out of sight price wise. Luckily a good friend just gave us 3 large cans because we keep her well stocked with canned goods we have preserved including salsa. I used part of a can to make pinto bean soup last week. I will freeze the rest of the can. At least we have enough Hatch chilies to last til next year.
When they first hit the stores, we went to buy some but they only had a few boxes getting ready to be put out. The produce manager was there and told us that the crop was very light this year due to some kind of disease that affected the young plants. That probably explains the supply and price.

We went back a week later and they had some roasted and I bought two containers marked hot and they were mild. I've had them in New Mexico and the hot ones can be scorching hot! I prefer a mix of the hot and mild - for my husband the hotter the better.

We just had green chili burritos for breakfast this morning!
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Old 09-09-2018, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
14,297 posts, read 17,491,099 times
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These were one of the things I missed the most when we moved from Phoenix to Raleigh. In season, I could get them easily at the Mexican grocery stores. As I could get roasted Anaheims and poblanos every weekend, I didn't get tons of hatch's.

Happily, there's one grocer that brings them in to The Triangle every year 1-2 weekends along with a roaster. (Bless you, Harris Teeter.) I buy 8-10 pounds EACH of mediums and hots, then spend two days peeling and freezing in little snack pack baggies.

Ironically, we're visiting Phoenix right now and, just last night, cooked a pork Chile Verde in the Instant pot using fresh, unroasted hatch Chili's and unroasted tomatillos. Very different (and not as good) than my usual version, which is my husband's favorite dish that I cook. But, when I get home, I may buy a batch of tomatillos, roast and freeze them.

ETA. They were 99cents for fresh in Phoenix yesterday. I don't remember what they were roasted in Raleigh. I don't give a grip - gotta have 'em. But it's not shockingly costly.
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Old 09-09-2018, 11:37 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,520,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlguy44 View Post
These would not be considered hot to someone accustomed to eating Scotch Bonnet peppers. Probably quite mild in comparison.
Ounce for ounce, yes, but Scotch bonnets and other super hot peppers are added to dishes in small quantities, like a seasoning, to make them hot.

By comparison, New Mexico chile is eaten in large quantities, often being the main ingredient itself (like a chile relleno or green chile stew, so the heat builds up.
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:02 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,813 posts, read 4,310,305 times
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We lived in El Paso for many years. It’s more southern New Mexico than Far West Texas , so green chile was a thing there, well before the rest of the country caught up.

During chile season, all of the grocery stores would have their big roasting drums turning outside the doors. The fabulous scent of roasting chiles is indelibly linked in my mind with “back to school “ time.

Now I roast my own on the grill.
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Old 09-09-2018, 02:19 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,821,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post

ETA. They were 99cents for fresh in Phoenix yesterday. I don't remember what they were roasted in Raleigh. I don't give a grip - gotta have 'em. But it's not shockingly costly.

Even cheaper in Tucson ... although I have 5# frozen in the freezer from my last trip to the Hatch chile festival.
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Old 09-09-2018, 02:34 PM
 
4,293 posts, read 6,391,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogboa View Post
I wonder if they will taste the same. Can't imagine Vidalia onions grown outside of Vidalia would be the same.



The taste, if not the Exact same, was so close as to be indiscernible from "Hatch" (picked up in NM and driven home). We grew both mild and hot.
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