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Old 09-23-2018, 03:23 PM
 
714 posts, read 329,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
They almost got South Carolina right. But the real BBQ pork is chopped, not pulled. Pulled is a foodie trend. And the mustard sauce is only a low country thing. Most of South Carolina is the same as North Carolina -- chopped whole hog with a pepper vinegar sauce.
I’ve been to Charleston and Columbia and found mustard based sauce for BBQ exclusively in these two cities.
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Old 09-23-2018, 03:26 PM
 
714 posts, read 329,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
California has the French dip au jus...excellent choice. I was worried they were going to use some 'precious' vegan concoction with alfalfa sprouts or micro-greens on a sprouted spelt flatbread, which literally no one I know would even touch.

Time to pay a visit to Philippe's. The original since 1908.
Liked Philippe’s a lot the time I visited LA. But also liked Cole’s, which also claims to have invented this sandwich. I say go to both.
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Old 09-23-2018, 03:50 PM
 
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Would think an onion burger might be a good choice for Oklahoma.

Italian beef is a great choice for Illinois, but would seriously consider the horseshoe sandwich (found in Springfield and immediately surrounding areas) also.

While I agree that the Philly cheesesteak is a great choice for Pennsylvania, anyone who is “Team Pat’s” or “Team Gino’s” doesn’t have working taste buds. I’ve eaten this sandwich at several places in the city, and the best was at Jim’s, with Tony Luke’s (tried at the ballpark) and Cosmo’s Deli very reasonable second choices. Geno’s and Pat’s were the worst places I tried them.

I don’t get the roast beef sandwich choice for New Hampshire. Never heard of this one. Same with bahn mi and Washington, reuben and Nebraska (that’s New York, if anything), salami and Missouri (also New York), ham sandwich and Michigan, and PBJ and Idaho. I don’t think they could come up with anything better for these states and just chose these.

Re Utah — the fry bread taco isn’t a sandwich to my way of thinking. A Crown burger (cheeseburger with fry sauce and added pastrami) is a better option, anyway.

Never heard of a Vermonter, though it sounds good.

Agreed that the Alabama one is just bizarre. They do have a mayo based BBQ sauce out there, but I’ve never seen this as a sandwich option, never mind an iconic one.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,187 posts, read 10,136,018 times
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...anntp#image=51

I've lived in Wyoming for sixteen years; I've never heard of a trout sandwich. The most popular sandwiches here are French Dips of various sorts.
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Under Moon & Star
1,576 posts, read 559,406 times
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Minnesota - walleye sandwich?

I don't think so...

Uh-uh. It's the Jucy Lucy, hands down.

The Best Juicy Lucy Burgers in the Twin Cities - Mpls.St.Paul Magazine

[I'm not saying they're the best, but they are iconic. Walleye sandwich? Not so much.]

PS - It's Jucy Lucy, not 'Juicy' Lucy!
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:47 PM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,240 posts, read 50,519,955 times
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I was surprised that New Jersey wasn't the Taylor ham, cheese, and egg on a hard roll. That's the "Jersey breakfast".

However, I happened to see the rerun of the Anthony Bourdain episode where he was at the shore and in Camden just last night, and he had an Italian sub. In this article, they pick the "Italian hoagie" as the NJ sandwich, and I bet they got the idea from that show. The fact that they call it a hoagie and not a sub is a dead giveaway that their resource is South Jersey.

Subs are good, but a Taylor ham sandwich says NJ.
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Old 09-23-2018, 06:29 PM
 
714 posts, read 329,007 times
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Found another such list. It actually makes more sense in some cases, and crosses over with the OP’s list in spots:

Recipes
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Old 09-23-2018, 06:38 PM
 
714 posts, read 329,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Minnesota - PS - It's Jucy Lucy, not 'Juicy' Lucy!
While I agree that this would be a more iconic choice for Minnesota, the spelling depends on which place you get it. Matt’s Bar spells it “jucy lucy” but the 5-8 Club uses the “juicy lucy” spelling. Both places claim to be the inventor of this sandwich, though no one knows for sure. There are apparently lots of other TwinCities eateries that offer this.

Now that I think about it, one could consider the hamburger a Connecticut iconic sandwich, and not just because of the steamed cheeseburger. Louis’ Lunch in New Haven claims to be the inventor of the hamburger sandwich and reportedly has acquired some kind of official confirmation of that idea — for what it’s worth, anyway.
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Old 09-23-2018, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC
1,791 posts, read 2,297,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
They almost got South Carolina right. But the real BBQ pork is chopped, not pulled. Pulled is a foodie trend. And the mustard sauce is only a low country thing. Most of South Carolina is the same as North Carolina -- chopped whole hog with a pepper vinegar sauce.
Love them both .. but crave the vinegar sauce. Unfortunately, for all the excellent BBQ we have in the Charleston area, vinegar is not prevalent

http://shop.charlestonpig.com/Charle...tle-201000.htm

YES to the Pig!
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Old 09-23-2018, 06:50 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,505 posts, read 25,705,659 times
Reputation: 8151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I was surprised that New Jersey wasn't the Taylor ham, cheese, and egg on a hard roll. That's the "Jersey breakfast".

However, I happened to see the rerun of the Anthony Bourdain episode where he was at the shore and in Camden just last night, and he had an Italian sub. In this article, they pick the "Italian hoagie" as the NJ sandwich, and I bet they got the idea from that show. The fact that they call it a hoagie and not a sub is a dead giveaway that their resource is South Jersey.

Subs are good, but a Taylor ham sandwich says NJ.
Taylor ham says North Jersey. They sell the same stuff as Case Pork Roll in South Jersey. I knew one person whose mother would get the Case stuff occasionally, but that was it.

One sandwich per state seems silly.
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