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Old 10-03-2018, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickerman View Post
I would like to know which ones to use on what and when. thanks
You just try them out. Think of this as an adventure.
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Old 10-04-2018, 07:58 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
2,901 posts, read 1,930,128 times
Reputation: 3492
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Chile powder is used as a base to make chili powder.

And for the sake of definition:

Chile is a pepper

Chili is a flavor

Basically, chili powder is a blend with a characteristic flavor. It is a complex flavor due to its incorporation of several spices in addition to a base of chile powder and can be used as a sole seasoning ingredient (not counting salt) to give your dish a Mexican flavor profile.

Chile powder (which is a broad heading that can consist of any number of types of chile including cayenne, Chimayo red, ancho, chipotle, or paprika) is a much simpler flavor profile as it consists of a single ingredient and generally would be used along with other spices to create a more complex flavor. The exception to this is when making a red chile sauce which is made primarily of red chile and any other spices are optional.

If you have a recipe that calls for cayenne pepper, you could hypothetically substitute another type of chile powder such as chipotle or smoked paprika for a smokier flavor, regular paprika for something with less 'heat', or New Mexico red chile for its particular flavor.

On the other hand, if your recipe calls for chili powder, you don't generally want to use a chile powder because it lacks the range and depth of flavor that the other spices in the blend, such as garlic and cumin, will bring to the dish.

If you are just trying to spice up some beans or ground beef or something, I suggest going with chili powder as it is kind of an all-in-one.
Not that I want to debate but this is incorrect and I'm only talking about the spelling.

Chile with an E is Spanish for pepper or the country in South America. If you are in Mexico and describing a pepper your would use the word with an 'e' as in Chile Poblano.

In EVERY other case an 'i' is used and some cases a double 'i' is used as in England.

So Chili is the correct spelling and pronunciation other than in Spanish. In fact, the original Indian word (Nahuatl) is Chilli. This is as per the dictionary.

I didn't know all of this and I actually did the research one time, coincidentally from another post on CD, don't remember when.

You can, however, use Chile. I do all of the time. I speak Spanish and it seems more natural to me. So for a Chile Relleno it is exactly that, it sure isn't a Chili Relleno. Likewise, Chili the spicy dish made with meat in Spanish would be Chile con Carne.

Just FYI: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chili
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Old 10-04-2018, 12:42 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,527,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
Not that I want to debate but this is incorrect and I'm only talking about the spelling.

Chile with an E is Spanish for pepper or the country in South America. If you are in Mexico and describing a pepper your would use the word with an 'e' as in Chile Poblano.
Where I live, in the United States, chile with a E means a pepper, the plant it comes from, or a sauce made with the pepper as the primary ingredient.

Here, chili with an I means a savory meat based stew flavored with chili powder, mainly associated with Texas.

For the most part, food labels I have seen, and even a casual internet search[1] supports the distinction I made[2]. I do understand that there are examples of the pepper being spelled chili with an I (or even as chillie, which seems to be an Indian subcontinent thing), but my explanation sought to remove that ambiguity for practical purposes even if one can find a "Cayenne chili powder" in England.

At least through my explanation, one can look at a "mislabeled" jar of red powder and figure out whether it is chile powder or chili powder regardless of the label maker's vowel preference.

[1] Chile Powder vs. Chili Powder - Google

[2] Here is an article that makes the same distinction I do from Southern Living magazine which is not a publication that serves or represents the Spanish speaking world.
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Old 10-04-2018, 02:41 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
2,901 posts, read 1,930,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Where I live, in the United States, chile with a E means a pepper, the plant it comes from, or a sauce made with the pepper as the primary ingredient.

Here, chili with an I means a savory meat based stew flavored with chili powder, mainly associated with Texas.

For the most part, food labels I have seen, and even a casual internet search[1] supports the distinction I made[2]. I do understand that there are examples of the pepper being spelled chili with an I (or even as chillie, which seems to be an Indian subcontinent thing), but my explanation sought to remove that ambiguity for practical purposes even if one can find a "Cayenne chili powder" in England.

At least through my explanation, one can look at a "mislabeled" jar of red powder and figure out whether it is chile powder or chili powder regardless of the label maker's vowel preference.

[1] Chile Powder vs. Chili Powder - Google

[2] Here is an article that makes the same distinction I do from Southern Living magazine which is not a publication that serves or represents the Spanish speaking world.
There is no consistency. In the example below, as you stated, it is just one ingredient but they use the 'i' spelling. That tells me you may say or spell it any way you want but but yes when I am describing the stew I say or spell it with an 'i' because it is in English so if you go by the dictionary it's with an 'i'. When I make Chili, I use just ancho, chipotle, cayenne and then add the garlic, cumin etc. I never use a blend. I was born and raised in Texas, close to Mexico but still Texas.
https://www.amazon.com/Simply-Organi...BCAAC7RXH&th=1

Last edited by gguerra; 10-04-2018 at 03:04 PM..
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:30 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,527,617 times
Reputation: 28705
Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
There is no consistency. In the example below, as you stated, it is just one ingredient but they use the 'i' spelling.
Which is why it pays to be educated on the subject.
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Old 10-04-2018, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
27,476 posts, read 17,629,902 times
Reputation: 39941
I'm Latina and have no idea, and spelling has never affected my cooking.
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Old 10-04-2018, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,288,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickerman View Post
It is puzzling to know when to use these 3 spices in what dishes and knowing (or not knowing) when they are interchangeable. What is your take on it?
They are not interchangeable. Read the labels.
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