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Old 10-16-2018, 05:17 PM
 
Location: NYntarctica
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Chicken parm is freaking delicious, I don't care if it's authentic or not
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Old 10-16-2018, 05:38 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,407 posts, read 38,395,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Chicken parm is freaking delicious, I don't care if it's authentic or not

I used to go to a tiny little Italian bar/restaurant in NJ that made a shrimp parm that completely violated the Italian 'rule' of no cheese with seafood with its mozzarella and parmgiano reggiano! And it was delicious!
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Old 10-16-2018, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Originally Posted by Bunjee View Post
That said, the Filipino lumpia I had always been served was more like eggrolls, including vegetables in the filling. What I often get are little meat-only fingers. Is it a regional thing?
Where did you have it with vegetables?

I had a Filipino boyfriend in high school (in California) and his family always served the meat kind. So, so delicious.
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
393 posts, read 80,358 times
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Angry German Chocolate Cake is not even German!

German Chocolate Cake! It's not even German!

In 1852, Samuel German developed a type of dark baking chocolate called Bakerís Germanís Sweet Chocolate.

On June 3, 1957, a recipe for Germanís Chocolate Cake, a combination of fluffy chocolate cake, caramel custard, pecans, and coconut, submitted by Mrs. George Clay appeared in The Dallas Morning News.

As word of the Germanís Chocolate Cake recipe spread across America so did sales of Bakerís Germanís Sweet Chocolate, increasing by as much as 73 percent. Over time, the possessive in Germanís was dropped and the cake eventually became known as German Chocolate Cake, a name that leads many to believe it originated in Germany and was brought to America by German immigrants. But it wasn't. My family is from Germany, and there is not a single dish that we put coconut in!

If you want a truly authentic German 'chocolate' cake, try Schwarzwšlder Kirschtorte (Black Forest Cake).

Last edited by Rumann Koch; 10-17-2018 at 08:00 AM..
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
German Chocolate Cake! It's not even German!

In 1852, Samuel German developed a type of dark baking chocolate called Bakerís Germanís Sweet Chocolate.
True, so itís not an ethnic food made wrong.

Personally I dislike chocolate cake gilded with either fruit preserves or coconut. It dilutes the chocolate flavor.

My German dessert of choice would be apple strudel, though I guess thatís actually Austrian...
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Old 10-17-2018, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
393 posts, read 80,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
True, so it’s not an ethnic food made wrong.

My German dessert of choice would be apple strudel, though I guess that’s actually Austrian...
You might like Apfelkuchen (apple cake). More German than Austrian, it is an open-faced low-profile sheet cake made with a sweet buttery dough, topped with sliced apples and either sugar and cinnamon, apricot glaze, or crumbles. I remember my mother put cottage cheese in the dough as the German recipe calls for quark, not available in the US.

Last edited by Rumann Koch; 10-17-2018 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:48 PM
 
4,836 posts, read 2,303,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
Personally, I don't care about "Authenticity". I just want something that tastes good.
Agreed, and to take it in the other direction I sometimes wonder how people are defining authentic and if they really have a good baseline for how the food is served away from touristy areas of the countries of origin.

There are some things restaurants just usually aren't going to do in USA even if their customer base is largely immigrants. If the pieces of chicken in the soup have the bones inside they risk a lawsuit. If they have the purple cubes of coagulated pigs blood floating in the curry few of the American customers are going to order it. Sure there are restaurants (usually in ethnic enclaves) that do it the same but it seems lots of people assume that any ethnic restaurant that isn't exactly like the Americanized chains is automatically authentic exactly like served in local neighborhoods overseas and must taste better.
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Old 10-17-2018, 09:39 PM
 
Location: NYntarctica
11,268 posts, read 5,809,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
I used to go to a tiny little Italian bar/restaurant in NJ that made a shrimp parm that completely violated the Italian 'rule' of no cheese with seafood with its mozzarella and parmgiano reggiano! And it was delicious!
In Peru there is actually a dish of Italian origin called "choritos a la parmesana" which are baked clams with parmiggiana cheese. It's amazing! Normally seafood shouldn't go with cheese, but I think shrimps or clams are an exception
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Old 10-17-2018, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,210 posts, read 16,784,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
You might like Apfelkuchen (apple cake). More German than Austrian, it is an open-faced low-profile sheet cake made with a sweet buttery dough, topped with sliced apples and either sugar and cinnamon, apricot glaze, or crumbles. I remember my mother put cottage cheese in the dough as the German recipe calls for quark, not available in the US.
That sounds really good. I think I'd try substituting yogurt cheese (whole milk yogurt strained overnight) for the quark.
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Old 10-19-2018, 05:20 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
711 posts, read 150,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
In Peru there is actually a dish of Italian origin called "choritos a la parmesana" which are baked clams with parmiggiana cheese. It's amazing! Normally seafood shouldn't go with cheese, but I think shrimps or clams are an exception
I'm not Italian, so those rules don't apply! I make a "Lobster Diablo" that has Parmesan (PR) as the final topping. I developed it using Caribbean spiny lobster. I also make a hogfish dish that uses gruyere.
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