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Old 10-03-2018, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
375 posts, read 71,264 times
Reputation: 315

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Medtran49 View Post
Do you actually go to German restaurants for sauerbraten? I wouldn't order it from a run of the mill restaurant. The actual German restaurants where I've seen it do pickle the meat and use gingersnaps. Have you tried Old Heidelberg or Cypress Nook? There's another one but I can't remember the name right now. It's been a while since we've been to any of them, but I can't believe they've changed that much.
Maybe you are thinking about The Ambry on E. Commercial. It's been around for a long time. Yes, good sauerbraten, but they are Austrian and known primarily for their schnitzels.

The others you mentioned, same as you, I haven't been to in a long time.
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Old 10-03-2018, 10:48 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,520 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20820
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
I grew up in a German household, and my father was a chef in NYC, but I cook Chinese, Italian, French, Thai, Cuban, Mexican, and many other cuisines at home.

You just have to make the effort, and go through the trouble to get quality ingredients.

Besides, it's fun! Have family members, especially children, help. And if friends are over, they can just drink wine and be inspired while watching you do your magic in the kitchen!
That's not the point. I cook. A lot. And the meals I prepare are delicious, if I may say so myself, but I cannot discern the authenticity of ethnic dishes. I can tell you what I think tastes good to my own palate, but discussions of authenticity are way out of my wheelhouse. Having never been to Thailand to have local Pad Thai, I would likely taste Gordon Ramsey's version and declare it very tasty.

Last edited by randomparent; 10-03-2018 at 11:19 AM..
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Old 10-03-2018, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
375 posts, read 71,264 times
Reputation: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ttark View Post
Poutine! The few places I've found it around Washingtax they've used shredded cheese. I don't know if this is a regional variation or just common ignorance, but true poutines use curd, not shredded.

I mean, I'm not Canadian (farthest I've ever been into Canada is Victoria) and even *I* know that.
Cheese curds are a must for an authentic poutine!

We have an ice cream shop (yes, an ice cream shop) down here that supposedly serves up the best poutine south of Quebec! It is the Dairy Belle Ice Cream in Dania Beach, Florida. I've read visiting Canadians rave about the authentic poutine served there, and during the winter season, there are lines that go around the parking lot! And you can end you meal with a creamy old fashioned ice cream.
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Old 10-03-2018, 11:05 AM
 
7,950 posts, read 3,852,505 times
Reputation: 27230
Quote:
Originally Posted by krosser100 View Post
Pad thai?!

I have countless horrendous pad thai in the US...better in LA, but still hit or miss

Somehow the success rate is higher in Australia

That was my first thought. I ordered some pretty disappointing pad thai a couple nights ago.
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Old 10-03-2018, 11:10 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,520,894 times
Reputation: 28700
Every Thai restaurant I have ever been to in the States has FOB Thai cooks and staff, so I can only hope they know how to cook their own cuisine. I guess I won't know until I have sampled pad thai across Thailand.
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Old 10-03-2018, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
20,946 posts, read 15,267,317 times
Reputation: 23722
Non-tomato BBQ sauces. It's very rare to find any good Alabama white sauce on chicken.
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Old 10-03-2018, 11:19 AM
 
2,508 posts, read 1,283,094 times
Reputation: 6650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
Good sauce, or gravy as my Italian friends call it, is THE key to any good Italian dish, and uses fresh, ripe tomatoes, quality olive oil, and fresh herbs.

ANY canned or jarred sauce does not cut it for a restaurant!

An Italian chef once told me that it is imperative to use fresh garlic cloves that you crush yourself -- not the pre-minced garlic in a jar. He said it makes a huge difference in the taste.
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Old 10-03-2018, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
8,586 posts, read 2,895,875 times
Reputation: 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post

Did you see the show where Gordon Ramsay got reamed for making a bad Pad Thai?
Part of the problem is that Chefs are often interested in winning awards and you don't win awards for Thai food.

You win awards for over fussy French or Japanese food, and there had been criticism of some reatarant guides, indeed the late A.A. Gill famously attacked the michelin guide which he called 'Out of Touch,' 'Bloated,' and 'Embarrassing'. Other critics have included the late Anthony Bourdain, Marco Pierre White, Mario Francesco Batali, Franck Dangereux, William Sitwell and numerous others.

Certainly Italian does not do as well in relation to Michelin nor does Indian food, Thai food or Indian food, indeed no Indian restaurant has ever received more than one michelin star.

People like Gordon Ramsay aren't expert on Thai food because if you want to be a succesful chef you are limited to what restaurant guides such as michelin dictate and you must learn your trade certainly not in a Thai restaurant but abd alsmost certainly in a French one.

This why people like Gordon Ransay are lauded the food establishment and why they win so many michelin stars.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AA Gill

Being French, of course the guide has always been the subject of conspiracy theories regarding the allocation of stars, the number of inspectors, and their quality and disinterest.

Having made the hierarchy of chefs, the guide found that it was in its interest to maintain it. A handful of grand and gluttonous kitchens seemed to keep their rating long after their fashion and food faded. Michelin evolved from the wandering Candide of food to become the creeping Richelieu: manipulative, obsessive, and secretive.

When the occasional ex-michellin inspector goes public, there are stories of exhausting and unsustainable lives on the road, covering vast areas where the pleasure of food is made a relentless and lonely craft. There are admissions that many dining rooms are not revisited year after year.

But still, Michelin has launched in a number of foreign countries. And though it claims its standards are universal and unimpeachable, it proves how Francophile and bloated and snobbish the whole business really is and that, far from being a lingua franca, the food on our plate is as varied as any other aspect of a national culture.

For instance, Italy has absurdly few three-star restaurants, apparently because the criteria of complexity and presentation aren’t up to Michelin—French—standards, and the marvelously rich and varied curries of India plainly seem to baffle the guide.

The city with the most stars is Tokyo, but then, many of its restaurants have barely a handful of chairs, and most benefit from the Gallic reverence for O.C.D. saucing and solitary boy’s knife skills.

In both London and New York, the guide appears to be wholly out of touch with the way people actually eat, still being most comfortable rewarding fat, conservative, fussy rooms that use expensive ingredients with ingratiating pomp to serve glossy plutocrats and their speechless rental dates.

What's Wrong With the Michelin Guide? Everything, Says A. A. Gill ...

Hard to please: Famed restaurant critic AA Gill's favourite eateries ..

A. A. Gill sticks the knife into Michelin | The Independent


Last edited by Brave New World; 10-03-2018 at 11:40 AM..
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Old 10-03-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,525 posts, read 42,694,765 times
Reputation: 57174
Pasta carbonara. The last time I ordered it in a restaurant (a very old, established Italian one) the egg was raw. It was disgusting.

I’ve made it at home, but I probably won’t order it out again.
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Old 10-03-2018, 12:34 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,140 posts, read 38,214,111 times
Reputation: 26625
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Pasta carbonara. The last time I ordered it in a restaurant (a very old, established Italian one) the egg was raw. It was disgusting.

Iíve made it at home, but I probably wonít order it out again.

I've had it in a restaurant tasting as if corn-starch or some other pasty substance was used to thicken it rather than just a cheese/egg mixture , it's a wonderfully simple and delicious dish but I doubt I'll ever order it out again.
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