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Old 10-03-2018, 12:39 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,145 posts, read 38,225,022 times
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Pirogi, I have yet to have a commercial version whose dough can hold a candle to grammy's.

And the way we always had them was boiled first, then cooled in the fridge with melted butter keeping them from sticking together. They were then pan-fried in butter with browned onions and served with sour cream and a little sprinkle of Kosher salt. Done really well I'd choose them over Surf & Turf.
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Old 10-03-2018, 12:49 PM
 
403 posts, read 227,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wasel View Post
An Italian chef once told me that it is imperative to use fresh garlic cloves that you crush yourself -- not the pre-minced garlic in a jar. He said it makes a huge difference in the taste.
I like to slice it very thin with a razor blade so that it melts into the olive oil!!!
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Old 10-03-2018, 12:52 PM
 
109 posts, read 26,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
Pirogi, I have yet to have a commercial version whose dough can hold a candle to grammy's.

And the way we always had them was boiled first, then cooled in the fridge with melted butter keeping them from sticking together. They were then pan-fried in butter with browned onions and served with sour cream and a little sprinkle of Kosher salt. Done really well I'd choose them over Surf & Turf.
Pierogies Plus in McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania (just a step or so outside of Pittsburgh) has the best pierogies outside of a local church supper. They do ship this time of year.
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Old 10-03-2018, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,848 posts, read 12,473,150 times
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Originally Posted by Ttark View Post
Poutine! The few places I've found it around Washingtax they've used shredded cheese. I don't know if this is a regional variation or just common ignorance, but true poutines use curd, not shredded.

I mean, I'm not Canadian (farthest I've ever been into Canada is Victoria) and even *I* know that.
Where do you find poutine in WA?
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Old 10-03-2018, 01:12 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,145 posts, read 38,225,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Formerly Known As Twenty View Post
Pierogies Plus in McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania (just a step or so outside of Pittsburgh) has the best pierogies outside of a local church supper. They do ship this time of year.

I may have to look into that, I've made them myself and they were pretty good if I do say so myself but my kitchen looked like a war zone when I was done. Taught me why Mom was never all that thrilled when I answered "what would you like for dinner?" with pirogi!

I'm always a little leery though. There's a Polish sausage known as Kabanosy, about the the diameter of a finger and delicious. When a local source I had that got all their meats from Chicago or NYC (the real deal ) closed I ordered some through Amazon, it was more like gristle sausage. I've also gone to several restaurants because some reviewers raved about their pirogi, when you grow up with Grammy and Mom making them I think it's a tough order to find a commercial equivalent.
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Old 10-03-2018, 01:15 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,145 posts, read 38,225,022 times
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Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
Cheese curds are a must for an authentic poutine!

We have an ice cream shop (yes, an ice cream shop) down here that supposedly serves up the best poutine south of Quebec! It is the Dairy Belle Ice Cream in Dania Beach, Florida. I've read visiting Canadians rave about the authentic poutine served there, and during the winter season, there are lines that go around the parking lot! And you can end you meal with a creamy old fashioned ice cream.


Place sounds like a cardiologist's dream!
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Old 10-03-2018, 01:41 PM
 
109 posts, read 26,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
I may have to look into that, I've made them myself and they were pretty good if I do say so myself but my kitchen looked like a war zone when I was done. Taught me why Mom was never all that thrilled when I answered "what would you like for dinner?" with pirogi!

I'm always a little leery though. There's a Polish sausage known as Kabanosy, about the the diameter of a finger and delicious. When a local source I had that got all their meats from Chicago or NYC (the real deal ) closed I ordered some through Amazon, it was more like gristle sausage. I've also gone to several restaurants because some reviewers raved about their pirogi, when you grow up with Grammy and Mom making them I think it's a tough order to find a commercial equivalent.
Pierogies Plus is owned and run by a Polish immigrant; many of her employees are also from Poland and the Ukraine. When you stop in to pick up an order, the message is often relayed between the register and the kitchen in Polish rather than English. The business is located in an former gas station in a rough part of a working class town that still has plenty of locals with Eastern European heritage living there. :-) That being said, this is definitely not a Mrs.T.'s factory operation! I think that the meats that they use in their hot sausage and other meat-containing pierogi come from another business located in the 'Rocks (Silver Star Meats)--their products are pretty tasty. I can say for certain that the bread they use for their kielbasa sandwiches comes from yet another McKees Rocks business as well. (Mancini's).

There's a good Polish deli that makes great sausages in Pittsburgh. I'll have to see if they carry the sausage that you described. It sounds tasty!
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Old 10-03-2018, 02:11 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,145 posts, read 38,225,022 times
Reputation: 26638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Formerly Known As Twenty View Post
Pierogies Plus is owned and run by a Polish immigrant; many of her employees are also from Poland and the Ukraine. When you stop in to pick up an order, the message is often relayed between the register and the kitchen in Polish rather than English. The business is located in an former gas station in a rough part of a working class town that still has plenty of locals with Eastern European heritage living there. :-) That being said, this is definitely not a Mrs.T.'s factory operation! I think that the meats that they use in their hot sausage and other meat-containing pierogi come from another business located in the 'Rocks (Silver Star Meats)--their products are pretty tasty. I can say for certain that the bread they use for their kielbasa sandwiches comes from yet another McKees Rocks business as well. (Mancini's).

There's a good Polish deli that makes great sausages in Pittsburgh. I'll have to see if they carry the sausage that you described. It sounds tasty!


Oh my! That does sound like my kinda place!

I may have to let the credit card cool off a bit after getting through Florence but I'm definitely gonna give it a try!

It shocks me now to realize what magic my Dad's Mom worked with a large cast iron coal/wood burning stove that had absolutely no dials or any other controls. She'd knead the dough and let it rest, she'd do that 5-6 times, when it was done it was like velvet. And I did notice on Pierogies Plus site they offer plain potato ones which is how Grammy made them, she'd add no fat to the potatoes but we made up for it with the onions browned in butter and the sour cream!
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Old 10-03-2018, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
376 posts, read 73,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Pasta carbonara. The last time I ordered it in a restaurant (a very old, established Italian one) the egg was raw. It was disgusting.

Iíve made it at home, but I probably wonít order it out again.
I've had Pasta Carbonara where it was prepared almost like having scrambled eggs with noodles!

You have to make the sauce over a double-boiler BEFORE adding to the pasta so that doesn't happen!
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Old 10-03-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
376 posts, read 73,308 times
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Originally Posted by sprez33 View Post
I like to slice it very thin with a razor blade so that it melts into the olive oil!!!
Or you can roast the garlic beforehand, and it will incorporate almost like butter.
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