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Old 10-04-2018, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
3,292 posts, read 1,838,604 times
Reputation: 10409

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Good pirogi over surf and turf? Any day of the week

I find the best place to buy them around here is at Polish and Ukrainian churches. The Ukrainian version is called Varyniky (sp?) but they are usually are just sold as pirogi.
They are always available during the Lenten season, but a couple of churches cook them - and other goodies - all year long.
I am new to Polish food. I want down to a Polish store and picked up some frozen mushroom and frozen potato and sauerkraut pierogies. They are this brand http://lilaspierogi.com/ Hopefully they are decent!

I find Lebanese style stuffed grapeleaves are NEVER done right in restaurants. I have given up. I only eat my own or those prepared at other's homes.
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,361 posts, read 7,121,412 times
Reputation: 31053
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprez33 View Post
I like to slice it very thin with a razor blade so that it melts into the olive oil!!!
Did you learn that from the Godfather?!
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:44 AM
 
11,697 posts, read 16,443,612 times
Reputation: 16340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
Mine is sauerbraten. Many restaurants serve pot roast with some vinegary brown sauce.

For authentic sauerbraten, the meat is marinated/pickled for several days in a mixture of vinegar or wine, water, herbs, spices, and seasonings.

Also the sauce is never right: it should have crushed ginger snaps in it.
Grandfather was a chef - cookies do not belong in Sauerbraten sauce.
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Old 10-04-2018, 06:03 AM
 
Location: North Oakland
8,834 posts, read 8,170,461 times
Reputation: 13337
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Pasta carbonara. The last time I ordered it in a restaurant (a very old, established Italian one) the egg was raw. It was disgusting.

I’ve made it at home, but I probably won’t order it out again.
One of the two times I know I got food poisoning, it was from spaghetti carbonara at what was nominally a good Italian restaurant. I found out later one of the cooks left the egg yolks sitting out after being separated, on a shelf above the stove. One of the sickest nights and days of my life.

I now live in western PA. Until the current century—the current decade, really—pizza got my vote as "most screwed up restaurant dish."

Last edited by jay5835; 10-04-2018 at 06:11 AM..
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Old 10-04-2018, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
376 posts, read 73,308 times
Reputation: 325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
Grandfather was a chef - cookies do not belong in Sauerbraten sauce.
My entire family is from Germany, and yes ginger snaps do belong in the sauce for sauerbraten.

BTW - my father was chef at the oldest and most famous German restaurant in Manhattan in the 50s and 60s.
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Old 10-04-2018, 06:21 AM
 
486 posts, read 185,659 times
Reputation: 788
Jamaican Jerk chicken or pork. Needs the really spicy seasoning, prepared fresh, and wood from the Allspice tree for smoking. It's never done right at restaurants as most probably use watered down prepared or bottled seasonings.
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Old 10-04-2018, 07:26 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
177 posts, read 32,827 times
Reputation: 549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
My entire family is from Germany, and yes ginger snaps do belong in the sauce for sauerbraten.

.

Agree. DH's Oma used gingersnaps to thicken. She also made them, no bought cookies for her!
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Old 10-04-2018, 07:31 AM
 
403 posts, read 227,443 times
Reputation: 798
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Did you learn that from the Godfather?!
Close! From Paulie in Goodfellas.................
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Old 10-04-2018, 08:48 AM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,826,319 times
Reputation: 18521
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Good pirogi over surf and turf? Any day of the week

I find the best place to buy them around here is at Polish and Ukrainian churches. The Ukrainian version is called Varyniky (sp?) but they are usually are just sold as pirogi.
They are always available during the Lenten season, but a couple of churches cook them - and other goodies - all year long.

Only if the person makes them from scratch and has some clue as to how to do it right.
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Old 10-04-2018, 09:07 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,145 posts, read 38,225,022 times
Reputation: 26638
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Good pirogi over surf and turf? Any day of the week

I find the best place to buy them around here is at Polish and Ukrainian churches. The Ukrainian version is called Varyniky (sp?) but they are usually are just sold as pirogi.
They are always available during the Lenten season, but a couple of churches cook them - and other goodies - all year long.

I think that's actually the Russian name. My grandparents were Ukrainian and though I have no idea how it's really spelled, they called them something that sounded like petter-hee.

I know what you mean about the churches, I was walking down E 7th St in Manhattan one time, an area which once had a large Ukrainian population and saw a hand lettered cardboard sign advertising homemade pirogi pointing to a basement doorway. I was unfortunately there on a day they weren't open but of course had to go back. I believe it was a social hall for the Ukrainian church down the st., English was a little sparse but their hospitality more than made up for it, I had a wonderfully warming bowl of Borscht before leaving with my bag of pirogi.

One of the things I always enjoyed abut NYC, virtually anywhere you go you're likely to stumble across something unexpected and it's usually a good thing.
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