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Old 10-04-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,945 posts, read 16,541,636 times
Reputation: 28730

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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
All of them if you happen to live in the US, because they are not authentic (except of very few places) but Americanized to please the local palate.
Even those who actually try very hard to cook like back home - they just don't have access to the authentic ingredients, and while some could be imported, many couldn't due to US food regulations.
We want "ethnic food" to be authentic, but we are almost never willing to pay for it.

Here is an interesting article about that:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.0fed2962b79a
https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.b1786e2e8577
Not just the US, but almost anywhere, food that is foreign to that place is often a shadow of itself. Ever try Jamican jerk chicken in Poland or Chile Rellenos in Vietnam?
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Old 10-04-2018, 02:14 PM
 
7,989 posts, read 3,874,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
Do you think there is some type of culinary standard throughout Japan, extending from Tokyo all the way down to the tiny fishing villages, in 4 star restaurants and roadside stands and in every house and apartment? There is no single recipe for any dish.

I'm not suggesting that there's a culinary standard throughout Japan. But for example you won't find these ridiculous Americanized sushi rolls focused more on packing full of multiple various ingredients like cream cheese , rather than achieving a perfect balance of flavors.
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Old 10-04-2018, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
376 posts, read 73,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Not just the US, but almost anywhere, food that is foreign to that place is often a shadow of itself. Ever try Jamican jerk chicken in Poland or Chile Rellenos in Vietnam?
Or spaghetti sauce in Germany? It's tomato soup!
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Old 10-04-2018, 03:01 PM
 
Location: New York
657 posts, read 370,225 times
Reputation: 1663
I'm picky about Indian food. A lot of places make it really oily and then they try to re-use the same base for different curries while simply swapping around the meat/vegetable additions. The over-use of oil is often so you don't have to stir/watch the pot so closely and prevent sticking (i.e. laziness) and it degrades the overall quality by a lot. Oftentimes it's covered up by overuse of cream and butter so you basically get a calorie-laden mess with little quality. There are street carts that make better food than some of the restaurants I've tried simply because the street cart is making food fresh to order.

On the other hand, a well-made dish is freshly prepared to order, contains minimal oil/grease and while ingredients may be similar you don't see a same base getting re-used to expedite the process. I can recommend some excellent places in NYC as well as some not-so-great places to avoid.
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Old 10-04-2018, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
376 posts, read 73,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
Ja, Ja - die Oma!
Explanation: die Oma = the Grandmother

Sorry, I was thinking in German when writing.
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Old 10-04-2018, 03:29 PM
 
3,070 posts, read 1,626,098 times
Reputation: 7974
Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
I'm not suggesting that there's a culinary standard throughout Japan. But for example you won't find these ridiculous Americanized sushi rolls focused more on packing full of multiple various ingredients like cream cheese , rather than achieving a perfect balance of flavors.
It seems like it should be pretty easy to avoid gas station quality Ďsushií, but I could be wrong.
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Old 10-04-2018, 03:44 PM
 
3,070 posts, read 1,626,098 times
Reputation: 7974
Quote:
Originally Posted by vladlensky View Post
I'm picky about Indian food. A lot of places make it really oily and then they try to re-use the same base for different curries while simply swapping around the meat/vegetable additions. The over-use of oil is often so you don't have to stir/watch the pot so closely and prevent sticking (i.e. laziness) and it degrades the overall quality by a lot. Oftentimes it's covered up by overuse of cream and butter so you basically get a calorie-laden mess with little quality. There are street carts that make better food than some of the restaurants I've tried simply because the street cart is making food fresh to order.

On the other hand, a well-made dish is freshly prepared to order, contains minimal oil/grease and while ingredients may be similar you don't see a same base getting re-used to expedite the process. I can recommend some excellent places in NYC as well as some not-so-great places to avoid.
What you call laziness they call affording to stay in business. Iím sure rent in NYC has to be 100 times what it is in most of India, and their most loyal customers (more Indians) aren't looking to increase their food costs.

Surely there must literally be a million cheapskate, rupee pinching, barely non-poisonous junk quality restaurants and food carts in India itself? I donít picture it as a land of food snobs; the hundreds of millions of downtrodden have to eat somewhere, and itís not going to be a place that uses only the best ingredients lovingly watched over by an expert chef.
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Old 10-04-2018, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
11,056 posts, read 11,465,626 times
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Chili.
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Old 10-04-2018, 04:16 PM
 
7,989 posts, read 3,874,784 times
Reputation: 27388
Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
It seems like it should be pretty easy to avoid gas station quality ‘sushi’, but I could be wrong.
I'm not even talking about gas station quality sushi. I'm talking about American sushi restaurants that seem to think the more creative they can be, the better. It's very difficult to find traditional sushi in the US.

To be honest, gas station quality sushi is sometimes better than what you find in the sit-down restaurants because they tend to keep it fairly simple. But it's still not traditional sushi.
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:00 PM
 
2,029 posts, read 1,431,976 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by evening sun View Post
I only eat ethnic foods at ethnic restaurants, so far, no problems.
Exactly!!!!!!
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