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Old 12-06-2018, 11:04 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,318 posts, read 1,168,133 times
Reputation: 4704

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
I'm a skeptic by nature, so take my comment on that basis.


Do you really think they are going to admit that their skillet doesn't work well on an electric stove top? That would reduce their customer base by around one-half.
Yeah, I understand that 100%. I have also seen a youtube video of a guy who will take your old cast iron pan and actually sand it down (not sandpaper of course, but some gadget on his drill) so that it is perfectly smooth inside and out. The video showed the whole process and the pans looked wonderful when finished.

My problem with the old heavy pans is that I can't tip up the pans anymore; my wrist isn't strong enough. But I really do like cast iron. Gas burners are the best for them, of course.
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Old 12-06-2018, 11:25 AM
 
980 posts, read 1,896,249 times
Reputation: 830
I have several cast iron pans and never use them because of the hassle seasoning them etc. But this thread is making me think again about using them.
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Old 12-06-2018, 11:29 AM
 
15,245 posts, read 16,362,075 times
Reputation: 25357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angorlee View Post
I have several cast iron pans and never use them because of the hassle seasoning them etc. But this thread is making me think again about using them.
We just started using ours again (based in part on this thread!) and are really enjoying them. Bacon and eggs are great in them and my husband used the big one last night to cook some chicken in the oven. For me, the only downside is that they're heavy, but I can handle them for now.
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Old 12-06-2018, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,967 posts, read 13,139,751 times
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You know, I am 72 and I can handle my old iron just fine. You get used to it, for one thing,

I am careful though.
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Old 12-06-2018, 04:15 PM
 
4,007 posts, read 1,743,985 times
Reputation: 11142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angorlee View Post
I have several cast iron pans and never use them because of the hassle seasoning them etc. But this thread is making me think again about using them.
What do you mean, "the hassle seasoning them"?


You season the pan once. Then you don't allow your spouse to wash it in the dishwasher, and you don't use steel wool on it. Where's the "hassle"?
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Old 12-06-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,967 posts, read 13,139,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
I got my answer back from Fields pans but am not completely sure about it. They didn't actually say it was completely level on the bottom. Here's what they said:

The Field Skillet does include a heat ring at the base of the pan, but this ridge provides only 0.04" clearance from the bottom of the pan and should not interfere with heat transfer on your burner. For best results, we recommend using a burner that matches the width of your skillet at low-medium heat and allowing the pan to pre-heat for 5 minutes before use.
I emailed them and asked specifically about glass topped stoves. They sent me a message back that incuded the above message: Thanks so much for reaching out. In testing Field Skillets have performed well on a variety of smooth top burners.

The Field Skillet does include a heat ring at the base of the pan, but this ridge provides only 0.04" clearance from the bottom of the pan and should not interfere with heat transfer on your burner. For best results, we recommend using a burner that matches the width of your skillet at low-medium heat and allowing the pan to pre-heat for 5 minutes before use.

We also want to make sure youíre aware of our returns policy: if you buy a Field Skillet but find it isnít a perfect fit for your kitchen, youíre free to return the pan within 45 days of delivery.


If you own an electric glass top, I think the pan would work, based on the above statement. They did not, however, answer my query about induction cook tops.

To the poster above who questions whether they would tell the truth, yeah, this is their business. I think they have a vested interest in building their reputation and making good products.

The cheapest way I know to get an iron skilket, is to ask your great aunt for hers. Or, you can buy cheap chinese skillets easily. If you want a good, well designed, functional piece of iron, go pay hundreds for a vintage Griswold or buy a new American designed and made product.

You can also buy a Lodge. It will be heavy and feel unbalanced, but it will work OK.
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Old 12-06-2018, 07:10 PM
 
24,554 posts, read 31,745,384 times
Reputation: 29753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
I'm a skeptic by nature, so take my comment on that basis.


Do you really think they are going to admit that their skillet doesn't work well on an electric stove top? That would reduce their customer base by around one-half.
I have 2 cast iron skillets - both vingage early 1900's. One has a heat ring, one does not. I cook in both on my electric range (glasstop), and have found absolutely no difference in how they cook.
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Old 12-07-2018, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,777 posts, read 17,088,419 times
Reputation: 26772
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
What do you mean, "the hassle seasoning them"?


You season the pan once. Then you don't allow your spouse to wash it in the dishwasher, and you don't use steel wool on it. Where's the "hassle"?
I have found them a huge hassle, because my husband believes they don't need cleaning after use. Then he will use it again. Then I have a huge build up of disgusting un-smooth cooked on crumbs on the bottom, which requires a big deep cleaning and then a reseasoning so he can ruin them again. So currently I have like 4 skillets I haven't used in 2 years because I keep meaning to get to this task some cold wintry day...
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Old 12-07-2018, 01:10 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,318 posts, read 1,168,133 times
Reputation: 4704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
I have found them a huge hassle, because my husband believes they don't need cleaning after use. Then he will use it again. Then I have a huge build up of disgusting un-smooth cooked on crumbs on the bottom, which requires a big deep cleaning and then a reseasoning so he can ruin them again. So currently I have like 4 skillets I haven't used in 2 years because I keep meaning to get to this task some cold wintry day...
Well, just don't scrub them down to the metal. Get the food off and wash lightly, stick them on the burner and pour some oil in and wipe around with a paper towel. When the pan gets almost smoking, turn off the burner and forget it. Unless I have stuck on stuff, I don't wash mine either. I just wipe them out with a damp paper towel and hide them in the oven till I need them next.
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Old 12-07-2018, 04:08 PM
 
4,007 posts, read 1,743,985 times
Reputation: 11142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
I have found them a huge hassle, because my husband believes they don't need cleaning after use. Then he will use it again. Then I have a huge build up of disgusting un-smooth cooked on crumbs on the bottom, which requires a big deep cleaning and then a reseasoning so he can ruin them again. So currently I have like 4 skillets I haven't used in 2 years because I keep meaning to get to this task some cold wintry day...
What we have here is not a cast-iron pan problem. What we have here is a failure to communicate.


If you think your husband would listen to a guy who has been cooking on cast iron pans for close on to 50 years:


"Hey buddy! You do need to clean out the pan. Ever hear of microbiology? Just put some Palmolive in it with a little water, lightly scrub it out with a plastic scrubby, and dry it off. Sheesh!"
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