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Old Yesterday, 08:26 PM
 
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So I have decided having one of these would be great. If I'm only going to get one cast-iron pan, what brand and size makes sense? I will probably use it mostly to saute chicken or for dishes that need to be cooked on the stovetop and in the oven.
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Old Yesterday, 11:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
So I have decided having one of these would be great. If I'm only going to get one cast-iron pan, what brand and size makes sense? I will probably use it mostly to saute chicken or for dishes that need to be cooked on the stovetop and in the oven.

If you plan to buy only one pan, you should buy a 12-inch Lodge skillet. You can easily find this at Wal-Mart for about $20. But I find it handy to also have a 10-inch skillet too.
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Old Today, 07:01 AM
 
Location: The analog world
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You can spend a ton of money on vintage cast-iron, but Lodge is widely-available and inexpensive. Size really depends on your personal preference and how many you typically cook for. I have a 12" Lodge, but honestly, it's too big now that I most often cook for two. A lot of cast iron cookbooks, including the popular Will it Skillet? base their recipes on a 10" skillet, which I think is well-sized for most cooks. The 12" is a beast and quite heavy, especially when full of food. If I were to buy a cast-iron pan again, I'd go for a 10" instead, but my opinion is simply my opinion. Go with what suits you best.
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Old Today, 07:09 AM
 
Location: SC
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I spent $32.00 on a vintage Griswold cast iron skillet, 20 years ago. It is great for cooking. Not all cast iron is created the same. I have had new ones, but ending up tossing them all. Then I found the Griswold at an antique store. The surface pores are smaller, and it works the oils nicely.

I am sure there are many good cooking quality cast iron skillets to be found out there.
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Old Today, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Houston/Brenham
3,570 posts, read 4,197,431 times
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Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
If you plan to buy only one pan, you should buy a 12-inch Lodge skillet. You can easily find this at Wal-Mart for about $20. But I find it handy to also have a 10-inch skillet too.
Exactly what I have, and very happy with it.

Amazon for me.
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Old Today, 07:14 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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I have a preseasoned Lodge, with cover, and the cover is also a shallow frying pan. Between the two pieces I use it a lot.

https://www.amazon.com/Lodge-Cooker-...16988620&psc=1
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Old Today, 07:23 AM
 
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Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
I spent $32.00 on a vintage Griswold cast iron skillet, 20 years ago. It is great for cooking. Not all cast iron is created the same. I have had new ones, but ending up tossing them all. Then I found the Griswold at an antique store. The surface pores are smaller, and it works the oils nicely.
I have a full set of Griswolds, purchased off e-Bay, and I use them every day. DH had to grind off the finish and re-season them but that was maybe 5 years ago and I haven't had to do it since. Bonus: I found out that my great-grandmother and her sister used to work as servants for the Griswold family in Erie, PA.
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Old Today, 07:32 AM
 
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I'd say to go for the 12". IMO it's better to have extra space you don't need much of the time than to have too little space. It is heavier, but I wouldn't think 2" would make a huge difference in that department.

I'll also add that in my view people like to over complicate the care and cleaning of cast iron. I fill mine with hot water and us a nylon brush to scrub it. If all of the gunk doesn't seem to be coming out I ::gasp:: add a little dish soap. I rinse, dry, and put on the stove burner for a few minutes to completely dry it out. I've done this for years and have never had an issue. A little soap isn't going to hurt a well seasoned pan. I don't think our great grandmothers worried over cast iron the way many seem to nowadays.
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Old Today, 07:38 AM
 
Location: The analog world
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Originally Posted by clawsondude View Post
I'd say to go for the 12". IMO it's better to have extra space you don't need much of the time than to have too little space. It is heavier, but I wouldn't think 2" would make a huge difference in that department.

I'll also add that in my view people like to over complicate the care and cleaning of cast iron. I fill mine with hot water and us a nylon brush to scrub it. If all of the gunk doesn't seem to be coming out I ::gasp:: add a little dish soap. I rinse, dry, and put on the stove burner for a few minutes to completely dry it out. I've done this for years and have never had an issue. A little soap isn't going to hurt a well seasoned pan. I don't think our great grandmothers worried over cast iron the way many seem to nowadays.
Not a big deal necessarily if you're just cooking chicken breasts and popping them in the oven to finish, but if it's something like casserole, there's a significant difference. A cornbread recipe scaled for a 12" skillet will feed an army.
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Old Today, 07:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Not a big deal necessarily if you're just cooking chicken breasts and popping them in the oven to finish, but if it's something like casserole, there's a significant difference. A cornbread recipe scaled for a 12" skillet will feed an army.
True, but OP mentioned the main use would be for things like sauteing chicken.
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