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Old 11-02-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: equator
2,629 posts, read 1,123,216 times
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I have a huge crockpot that I make my own stock with. I will get a giant roasted chicken and put all the bones and skin in it, some celery, onion, garlic, peppercorns and get such a rich, flavorful broth. I freeze some in plastic bottles. Same thing with beef bones. Not salty when homemade.

But, when I tried it on a pork loin, it came out like pulled pork. Shredded texture. I much prefer the loin to stay intact after a dip in the marinade or herb rub, browned in a skillet, then roasted in the oven.

Haven't tried it for lentils but that sounds really tasty.
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Old 11-02-2018, 11:42 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,028 posts, read 25,842,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mary_228 View Post
........... A downside is that you cannot cut the recipe size as you can when stovetop cooking. ...............
That can be turned into a plus for a person who doesn't enjoy cooking. The excess can be packaged in single servings, frozen, and it will provide several good home cooked microwave meals.
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Old 11-02-2018, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,182 posts, read 16,748,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blisterpeanuts View Post
Slow cooker crock pots are great for making lentil soup. Lentils take hours to cook; I set it up at 8am, come home at 6pm and it's ready for supper.

Take a bag of dry lentils, a can of stewed tomatoes, sliced fresh celery including the stalks, carrots, some soy sauce, chunks of ham if desired, balsamic vinegar, basil, bay leaf, pepper, salt, onions, oregano and about a quart of clean filtered water. Run on low for 8 hours. You'll have a delish soup ready for you at supper time. And the next day, it will be even tastier. Send some of it in a thermos with the kid for school lunch. A pot of soup costing maybe $3 total, that will feed your family for 2-3 days! Don't forget to make corn bread to go along with it.

Recently I made a pot roast in the Crock Pot and it came out very tender and delicious. Next, want to try chicken, going for a jerk chicken or pulled chicken that falls off the bones.

I've heard great things about Instant Pot, supposedly does everything a Crock Pot can do plus a few more such as making yogurt and some pressure cooker type of stuff like fast rice and beans. It's just another $129+tax in order to do incrementally better than what we already have with our rice cooker & Crock Pot. Maybe next year when the prices have come down a bit. Liking the idea of a smarter, programmable pressure-like cooker, but waiting until it's no longer just a novelty.
Not to say you canít make lentil soup in the crock pot, but Iím mystified by this post... lentils are the fastest cooking bean and can be done in 20 or 30 minutes.

https://www.delish.com/cooking/recip...-cook-lentils/
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Old 11-02-2018, 12:07 PM
 
2,701 posts, read 1,777,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
Slow cookers are very expensive to use. The only benefit is scheduling. Your meal cooks while you are at work and clean-up is easier.

People have used slow cookers for years before we had electricity. you put your meal in the pot on a trivet on the wood stove. Over the pot you put a metal box like a breadbox with no bottom. It works just as well as the electric ones.

Millennials have no idea what I'm talking about. My house was built in 1885 and I could live very comfortably the way the builders did. Millennials don't even know how to build a fire without matches.
Expensive to use? I don't understand.
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Old 11-02-2018, 01:03 PM
 
3,437 posts, read 3,250,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
Not to say you canít make lentil soup in the crock pot, but Iím mystified by this post... lentils are the fastest cooking bean and can be done in 20 or 30 minutes.

https://www.delish.com/cooking/recip...-cook-lentils/
Well, I guess they are cooked enough to be tender in 30 minutes, but the recipes I've used have always called for 5-8 hours in the slow cooker. For example, this one.
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Old 11-02-2018, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,820 posts, read 3,594,226 times
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Just not having to stand at the pot almost the entire time
your food is cooking is reason enough to have a slow cooker
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,710 posts, read 8,787,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joyeaux View Post
Oregon, please explain what's better about the dutch oven. I love pot roast and crock pot works for me. But help me understand what will be different if I go with my Le Creuset Dutch Oven. Thanks!
Nothing will be different in the outcome. In fact, there are charts for converting Dutch oven recipes to Crockpot recipes and vice versa on the web. (I have one posted on the inside of a kitchen cabinet door.) The amount of energy consumed between the appliances to make your meal, however, will differ significantly. Using a Dutch oven inside your range is actually more efficient than using an electric slow cooker, at least according to the experts.
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,420 posts, read 42,789,579 times
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I am not understanding how it's "OK" to leave a crock pot unattended, while most of us accept that it's "Not OK" to leave a similar size pot on the stove unattended. Even if the stove is an electric one set on "low". I know a lot of people get away with using a crock pot like this, and they are more or less designed to do it - maybe there are some sort of fail-safe controls I don't know about.


But, me, if I were to even think about leaving something like a crock pot heating and un-attended, in my mind's eye I see the stern face of Uncle Rickover, admonishing me that I can't leave my "watch-station" like that...


So, are there fail-safe controls in (most) crock pots that I don't know about?
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:23 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,710 posts, read 8,787,561 times
Reputation: 21091
Okay, one thing that we need to address is that when using a Dutch oven for slow cooking (aka braising), the pot, covered with its lid, is usually placed inside a range rather than being left to simmer on a stove.

You can successfully braise on a stove, but it's more difficult to maintain the appropriate temperature, so the Dutch oven will need more attention to prevent scalding than it would inside the oven.

Braising in an oven also takes less time than in an electric slow cooker, so Crockpots can be very convenient for those who work away from home all day. (BTW, I'm not advocating leaving an electric appliance unattended, but I think we all know that's what generally happens.)

Here's a link to a conversion chart similar to the one I keep handy in my kitchen...

http://www.apronfreecooking.com/wp-c...Oven-Times.jpg

Last edited by randomparent; 11-02-2018 at 02:37 PM..
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Old 11-02-2018, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
7,791 posts, read 5,360,320 times
Reputation: 9442
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
I am not understanding how it's "OK" to leave a crock pot unattended, while most of us accept that it's "Not OK" to leave a similar size pot on the stove unattended. Even if the stove is an electric one set on "low". I know a lot of people get away with using a crock pot like this, and they are more or less designed to do it - maybe there are some sort of fail-safe controls I don't know about.


But, me, if I were to even think about leaving something like a crock pot heating and un-attended, in my mind's eye I see the stern face of Uncle Rickover, admonishing me that I can't leave my "watch-station" like that...


So, are there fail-safe controls in (most) crock pots that I don't know about?
It won't run the risk of burning or catching fire. Not sure where your confusion stems from.
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