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Old 11-02-2018, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,420 posts, read 42,801,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
It won't run the risk of burning or catching fire. Not sure where your confusion stems from.

A crock pot has an electric heating element, not exactly like an electric stove, but I can't see why it would not present the same level of fire hazard as the stove.



I know people think a crock pot won't catch fire, and I have never heard of one catching fire, but, it seems to me to be just as capable of starting a fire as a range is.



The crock pot has a smaller heating element, so it can't get as hot as a stove can.
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Old 11-02-2018, 04:12 PM
 
12,622 posts, read 14,638,128 times
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Less work, and meat in a crockpot is so tender. I have found differences in different crockpots, though. I like my original crockpot, the kind that doesn't have a removable crock, the best. It seems to cook more slowly and everything I cook in it is fall-apart tender. The ones I have with removable crocks don't cook quite the same, but I still use them.


I almost always cook roasts in the crockpot. And stew. Early in the morning I cut up vegetables, brown stew meat and add liquid (I use V8 juice for stew) and seasonings, put it all in the crockpot and let it cook all day (usually about 10 hours). It smells so good. At dinnertime I make cornbread in a cast iron skillet to go with it. The meat and vegetables are so tender.
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Old 11-02-2018, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
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Not only does it tenderize your food it makes it much more flavorful because all the flavors have time to meld with each other.
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Old 11-02-2018, 10:37 PM
 
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i like it because the kitchen is clean and i can go play in the shop. I get hungry later, suppers cooked
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Old 11-03-2018, 12:36 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,950 posts, read 12,528,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
A crock pot has an electric heating element, not exactly like an electric stove, but I can't see why it would not present the same level of fire hazard as the stove.



I know people think a crock pot won't catch fire, and I have never heard of one catching fire, but, it seems to me to be just as capable of starting a fire as a range is.



The crock pot has a smaller heating element, so it can't get as hot as a stove can.
Slow cookers are designed to be left unattended. They have been around for 30 or more years, and people have been leaving them unattended all of that time. Recipes tell you how much liquid to add to the pot, and it never boils dry. A pot on a stove can boil dry and ultimately cause a fire. It isn’t the element, it is the very low heat that keeps using them safe.

You can also leave an oven unattended. My mother used to do this on Sunday. She’d put a roast in the oven, and when we got home from church, thr roast would be done. I do not recommend this, but technically you could do this. The problem with the oven is if you are delayed, your dinner might be ruined.

The only kitchen appliance I would leave unattended would be a properly working slow cooker.
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Old 11-03-2018, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,524 posts, read 14,317,996 times
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"Did the old folks back in your day sneer at you and your peers for not knowing how to make soap out of ash and animal carcass?"

Soap was a luxury.

--

"How are slow cookers "very expensive to use" anyway?"

Unless you need the heat to help warm that end of the house, or you care nothing about your electric bill, slow cookers are costly to use. Now, pressure cookers on the other hand, make cook your vegetables more quickly and the veggies don;t get soggy. I remember when pressure cooers were invented.
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Old 11-03-2018, 07:15 AM
 
3,437 posts, read 3,252,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
I have a huge crockpot that I make my own stock with. I will get a giant roasted chicken and put all the bones and skin in it, some celery, onion, garlic, peppercorns and get such a rich, flavorful broth. I freeze some in plastic bottles. Same thing with beef bones. Not salty when homemade.

But, when I tried it on a pork loin, it came out like pulled pork. Shredded texture. I much prefer the loin to stay intact after a dip in the marinade or herb rub, browned in a skillet, then roasted in the oven.

Haven't tried it for lentils but that sounds really tasty.
Do you mean to say you use a roasted chicken, or a roasting chicken?

I always roast whole chickens in the oven, in a baking bag to keep it juicy and tender. But cooking one in the crock pot sounds like a great idea.
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Old 11-03-2018, 07:25 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
18,075 posts, read 17,208,003 times
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https://kitchencookings.com/cooking-...rgy-efficient/

There are several factors that determine how much energy your slow cooker consumes. The most important factor is, buying a modern slow cooker with efficient energy ratings. Further factors include the right size of the slow cooker, the cooking temperature, and length of cooking time.


Apparently the new ones are energy efficient. Mine is an ancient crock pot. I can remove the ceramic pot and put it in the dishwasher but it's sounding like it's not too energy efficient.

However, the food comes out tasting great, it smells good, and I don't have to run in and see if it's burning all the time like I would if I made something like a pot roast on top of the stove. You can go to work and come home and the meal is ready. That's the best part--you do not have to be there tending it.
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Old 11-03-2018, 08:50 AM
 
2,701 posts, read 1,777,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
"Did the old folks back in your day sneer at you and your peers for not knowing how to make soap out of ash and animal carcass?"

Soap was a luxury.

--

"How are slow cookers "very expensive to use" anyway?"

Unless you need the heat to help warm that end of the house, or you care nothing about your electric bill, slow cookers are costly to use. Now, pressure cookers on the other hand, make cook your vegetables more quickly and the veggies don;t get soggy. I remember when pressure cooers were invented.

I still don't get it. These are low-wattage appliances. They don't pull much power.
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Old 11-03-2018, 09:46 AM
 
23,964 posts, read 31,184,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
The best use for a crock pot is to put a meal in to cook while you are away from home. You get home and there is a hot meal all ready.

I prefer my pot roast done in the oven in a heavy cast iron dutch oven. But to do that, someone has to be there to babysit it. Pot roast in the crock pot is still an excellent meal and it's really nice to arrive home tired and there it is, waiting for you, and it is still good if you arrive home late.

You can't beat a crock pot for cooking dry beans.

I don't use a crock pot for chicken because chicken doesn't require long cooking to get it tender.
I've done it both ways. Zero difference in the taste for me.
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