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Old Yesterday, 02:48 PM
 
5,211 posts, read 3,028,226 times
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Thanks for the tips and reminders, mainebrokerman.

The carcass (we love calling it that ) goes home with daughter to make soup. Generous amounts go to whomever wants to take it home. But there's always enough for us too. That means a lotta bird.

Ever buy a turkey and get a complimentary ham? After Thanksgiving broiler open face sandwiches: Buttered toast, slices of ham and turkey covered with cheese sauce. That used to be Mom's specialty.

The turkey must be large enough at our home to hold some stuffing. That's how I get that good roasted bird flavor throughout my stuffing - by stirring the bird stuffing into the pan stuffing at the last minute. One more thing to do at the last minute. Be sure to rinse the cavity well first, dry and season before stuffing.

We used to do the whole sew-'er-up-with-thread and skewers thing but have learned that a piece of foil or even a slice of plain bread heel will work with a modern turkey to keep the stuffing in.

Look around that raw bird and find the clumps of fat. You can lay those on top of your pan stuffing to additionally flavor it. (Take them off before the company sees them. Heh.)

I think back to the Forties and Fifties when I was little and the birds were tough free range turkeys. Poor Mom used to get up at about three in the morning to get it in the oven. My family all had to eat at noon sharp even on holidays.

Then she'd lie on the davenport and get up every so often to baste the cloth she kept it covered with to keep it from drying out.

Then, at serving time she didn't even sit down but acted as maid, decked out in one of her "company aprons," keeping the serving dishes full and filling the beverage glasses. This was not at all uncommon.

In spite of how relatively convenient today's turkeys are it's one of my least favorite tasks to get out of bed and, with only a cup of coffee to buoy me up, having to wrestle that cold, greasy, difficult to balance creature while I stuff it. But now that the "old folks" have all passed on we can eat at a time that is kinder to the cook, at least.

Every time I do it I'm in mind of Phyllis Diller saying in one of her routines that it took her eight hours to stuff the turkey and then she realized it was all falling out of the neck end.

My dressing is the same as my maternal grandmother and Mom's. Fresh bakery bread toasted and sliced into cubes, minced onion, salt pepper,, poultry seasoning, sage, a little melted butter and a little chicken broth. I make it a day ahead but leave out the liquids. That gives the bread a chance to absorb the seasonings.

We live in a small city with Germanic influence and many here add cooked ground meat or dried fruit to their stuffing.
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Old Yesterday, 03:47 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,789 posts, read 42,918,745 times
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Y’all, I just got a turkey at Food Lion for $.27 a lb. it was under $4. I don’t even know yet if I’m home or away, but I couldn’t pass that up.
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Old Yesterday, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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I dry brine the turkey as it finishes thawing in the fridge over a couple of days.

I make turkey broth about a week before T-day, to flavor the stuffing /dressing with. I stuff the turkey with part of the stuffing, and I bake the rest in a casserole dish. Many times, I have cooked the dressing in the microwave for want of oven space.

I make cornbread the night before and split pieces of it open to dry out overnight. Then I combine brown rice with crumbled cornbread, a chopped apple, chopped onion, chopped celery, sage, caraway and walnuts, and salt and pepper. I might well add some fresh rosemary as well. I then add the turkey broth to make a loose mixture and proceed.

My mother told me that you need plenty of onion and sage in the dressing. (We never called it “stuffing”) and I’ve remembered that bit if wisdom over the years.
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Old Yesterday, 05:07 PM
 
1,970 posts, read 3,323,942 times
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We, more accurately me, cook our bagged turkey breast in an electric roaster on my basement workbench. This leaves the ovens free for all the other dishes.

Yes it is only a partial bird but neither of us likes the dark meat. Yes it is impossible to achieve a presentation quality browning in an electric roaster but it is so convenient to not have the bird occupying all oven space.
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Old Yesterday, 05:17 PM
 
5,211 posts, read 3,028,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MI-Roger View Post
We, more accurately me, cook our bagged turkey breast in an electric roaster on my basement workbench. This leaves the ovens free for all the other dishes.

Yes it is only a partial bird but neither of us likes the dark meat. Yes it is impossible to achieve a presentation quality browning in an electric roaster but it is so convenient to not have the bird occupying all oven space.
One of us the other day called Thanksgiving a cook's logistic nightmare or something to that effect. Too true.

For me it's all the things that have to be done at the last minute and still get everything to the table hot. Thank goodness for microwave ovens. Turkey can be tricky to reheat.
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Old Yesterday, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
27,876 posts, read 17,783,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
One of us the other day called Thanksgiving a cook's logistic nightmare or something to that effect. Too true.

For me it's all the things that have to be done at the last minute and still get everything to the table hot. Thank goodness for microwave ovens. Turkey can be tricky to reheat.
It really is. I start days before and cut and prep everything that I can. The next make things that will be fine for a couple days like the pie, have the casseroles set up to go in oven, etc. We only have one oven, so doing the bird in the grill helps a LOT. The day of I'm still making things like the gravy because I need the turkey drippings.

I hate microwaves and I haven't had to use it.... yet.
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Old Yesterday, 05:49 PM
 
17,217 posts, read 22,254,666 times
Reputation: 31364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Thanks for the tips and reminders, mainebrokerman.

The carcass (we love calling it that ) goes home with daughter to make soup. Generous amounts go to whomever wants to take it home. But there's always enough for us too. That means a lotta bird.

Ever buy a turkey and get a complimentary ham? After Thanksgiving broiler open face sandwiches: Buttered toast, slices of ham and turkey covered with cheese sauce. That used to be Mom's specialty.

The turkey must be large enough at our home to hold some stuffing. That's how I get that good roasted bird flavor throughout my stuffing - by stirring the bird stuffing into the pan stuffing at the last minute. One more thing to do at the last minute. Be sure to rinse the cavity well first, dry and season before stuffing.

We used to do the whole sew-'er-up-with-thread and skewers thing but have learned that a piece of foil or even a slice of plain bread heel will work with a modern turkey to keep the stuffing in.

Look around that raw bird and find the clumps of fat. You can lay those on top of your pan stuffing to additionally flavor it. (Take them off before the company sees them. Heh.)

I think back to the Forties and Fifties when I was little and the birds were tough free range turkeys. Poor Mom used to get up at about three in the morning to get it in the oven. My family all had to eat at noon sharp even on holidays.

Then she'd lie on the davenport and get up every so often to baste the cloth she kept it covered with to keep it from drying out.

Then, at serving time she didn't even sit down but acted as maid, decked out in one of her "company aprons," keeping the serving dishes full and filling the beverage glasses. This was not at all uncommon.

In spite of how relatively convenient today's turkeys are it's one of my least favorite tasks to get out of bed and, with only a cup of coffee to buoy me up, having to wrestle that cold, greasy, difficult to balance creature while I stuff it. But now that the "old folks" have all passed on we can eat at a time that is kinder to the cook, at least.

Every time I do it I'm in mind of Phyllis Diller saying in one of her routines that it took her eight hours to stuff the turkey and then she realized it was all falling out of the neck end.

My dressing is the same as my maternal grandmother and Mom's. Fresh bakery bread toasted and sliced into cubes, minced onion, salt pepper,, poultry seasoning, sage, a little melted butter and a little chicken broth. I make it a day ahead but leave out the liquids. That gives the bread a chance to absorb the seasonings.

We live in a small city with Germanic influence and many here add cooked ground meat or dried fruit to their stuffing.

I think back to the Forties and Fifties when I was little and the birds were tough free range turkeys. Poor Mom used to get up at about three in the morning to get it in the oven. My family all had to eat at noon sharp even on holidays.

Then she'd lie on the davenport and get up every so often to baste the cloth she kept it covered with to keep it from drying out.



thank you (and everyone else) for posting!!

maybe thats why my grandmothers cooked the bird so long.....as you said it was a tough free range one (or possibly wild)

love the word davenport (a brand of couch/sofa but that word got generalized to mean sofa)

I had an old meat wrapper (madelaine) that called her couch a divan …. (means a couch with no backing or arms)

that dressing sounds good!!
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Old Yesterday, 05:51 PM
 
17,217 posts, read 22,254,666 times
Reputation: 31364
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Y’all, I just got a turkey at Food Lion for $.27 a lb. it was under $4. I don’t even know yet if I’m home or away, but I couldn’t pass that up.
wow!! thats cheap!!

they are .39lb around here from hannaford (supermarkets up this way ….owned by the same company from Belgium that food lion is )
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Old Yesterday, 05:56 PM
 
17,217 posts, read 22,254,666 times
Reputation: 31364
is anyone else hearing the younger crowds gather for "friendsgiving"??
my son mentioned this a few years back- just a festive gathering around the holiday for good friends...not family

just wondering if this is catching on in different regions??


my stores are getting many special orders for fresh turkeys for this weekend and next … specifically for friendsgiving….
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Old Yesterday, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Central New Jersey
1,624 posts, read 565,030 times
Reputation: 2793
We take advantage of our free turkeys from our local supermarket. We only prefer the breast. With 2 cards that's 2 we will have in the freezer for future use. One usually gets cooked whole and the other for turkey barley soup, unless my wife has different plans for them of course lol
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