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Old 11-13-2018, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,112 posts, read 5,276,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
It occurs to me that the OP may have confused "Jewish" with "gluten-free" because of the special unleavened foods that are eaten at Passover.
What a silly notion. Bread rises because of yeast. Yeast is a fungus. Gluten is a protein found in wheat.
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Old 11-13-2018, 11:41 AM
 
5,555 posts, read 3,404,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
What a silly notion. Bread rises because of yeast. Yeast is a fungus. Gluten is a protein found in wheat.
I don't know what was in the OP's mind; I'm not saying this is what he thought. But many non-Jews have heard of Jewish people clearing products like bread, cakes, cookies, etc. out of the house before Passover and substituting different foods instead, so the notion might arise that it is wheat, rather than yeast, that is being dispensed with.
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Old 11-13-2018, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
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Jewish desserts are no better/worse health-wise than other desserts. But, some of the more healthy ones from my childhood were baked apple and coconut maccaroons.
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Old 11-13-2018, 01:00 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Many people make their pie crusts with leaf lard. In addition, there are a number of Mexican pastries that also are made with lard.

Increasingly, bacon is being incorporated into a number of sweet applications including doughnuts.

Here are some examples:

https://www.yummly.com/recipes/pork-desserts
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/pork-...test_b_2625937



"Incorporating bacon" into deserts is a fad. I already mentioned pie crust.



The original question was about Jewish deserts, which traditionally do not, and never will contain pork products.
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Old 11-13-2018, 01:12 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,703 posts, read 21,889,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
It occurs to me that the OP may have confused "Jewish" with "gluten-free" because of the special unleavened foods that are eaten at Passover.



I'm sure there are still people who use lard for homemade pie crusts, and I certainly don't have a problem with that, but it would be difficult to find a product in a standard American supermarket that used lard. It's been considered a no-no for so long that most bakeries just don't use it.

I'm aware of bacon on doughnuts and such as a current trend; I've had cupcakes with bacon at specialty shops. My statement that desserts are 99.9% pork-free was obviously an exaggeration. But the point was that the vast majority of standard baked goods in any supermarket are NOT going to contain pork products and it's not necessary to peruse the Jewish foods aisle to find them.



And first confused "Jewish" with "Kosher".



Not all Jews are Kosher, and not all Kosher products are gluten free.



And not all "gluten free" products are suitable for weight loss diets. Many make up for it with extensive use of cream, butter, eggs, etc.


I once had a small slice of a chocolate gluten free cake that while delicious, would in no way qualify as a diet food.
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Old 11-13-2018, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Not low-cal or gluten free, but another vote for hamentashen.
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Old 11-13-2018, 02:08 PM
 
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Okay, the reality is that there are virtually NO good "Jewish" desserts that you're gonna find pre-packaged in the aisle of a Jewish or kosher store. The only thing about kosher food being higher quality is that the rules of kosher slaughter (which only apply to meat or poultry) require that the animal is healthy at the time of slaughter, and that they are slaughtered in a specified, humane way, which involves a quick stroke of an extraordinarily sharp knife across the neck vessels. The animal then bleeds to death very rapidly. It is a very quick, humane, and essentially painless death, because the knife is so sharp. But none of this applies to baked goods.

So, if what you want is good Jewish desserts, you need a Jewish bakery, the kind that has fresh baked bread, cakes, cookies. Black and White cookies, almond horns, babkas, checkerboard cake, 7 layer cake, almost anything you find in a Jewish bakery could be excellent. It's not really Jewish cuisine, per se, but more like NYC Jewish bakery cuisine.
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Old 11-13-2018, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,222 posts, read 16,798,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
Okay, the reality is that there are virtually NO good "Jewish" desserts that you're gonna find pre-packaged in the aisle of a Jewish or kosher store. The only thing about kosher food being higher quality is that the rules of kosher slaughter (which only apply to meat or poultry) require that the animal is healthy at the time of slaughter, and that they are slaughtered in a specified, humane way, which involves a quick stroke of an extraordinarily sharp knife across the neck vessels. The animal then bleeds to death very rapidly. It is a very quick, humane, and essentially painless death, because the knife is so sharp. But none of this applies to baked goods.

So, if what you want is good Jewish desserts, you need a Jewish bakery, the kind that has fresh baked bread, cakes, cookies. Black and White cookies, almond horns, babkas, checkerboard cake, 7 layer cake, almost anything you find in a Jewish bakery could be excellent. It's not really Jewish cuisine, per se, but more like NYC Jewish bakery cuisine.
I don't disagree about the grocery store aisles part, but "NYC Jewish bakery cuisine" is really only going to be Americanized versions of Ashkenazi Jewish recipes, because most American Jews come from the Ashkenazi/Eastern European background. Some more fun Jewish desserts to explore will come from the Sephardic/Spain/Mediterranean Jewish traditions.

Here's a few. https://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/28/dining/28pass.html

A good source for recipes of both types is Claudia Roden's beautifully comprehensive tome The Book of Jewish Food.
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Old 11-13-2018, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,242 posts, read 7,534,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Gluten is okay unless someone has celiac disease. What I find odd is people who ate gluten all their life, all of a sudden claim to have "gluten intolerance". Why didn't they get ill when they were eating it before? Gluten free diets are mostly a fad and in a few years, people will return to eating gluten again. Its also a way to mark up food items, four to five times; gluten-free bread is five dollars a loaf. No thanks.
Twenty years ago wheat didn't contain GMOs and that is what make people sick. For me it brings on IBS and migraines.

I can go to Italy and eat bread and pasta all day long because GMOs are illegal but not here.

Wheat is very different now than what it used to be.
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Old 11-13-2018, 07:58 PM
 
1,321 posts, read 846,084 times
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Halvah is honey, tahini, and nuts.


** I remember as a kid at my grandmother's house, standing at the stove and watching her make this.
She used pistachio nuts. Seems like she used butter also???
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