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Old 11-24-2018, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
6,842 posts, read 12,019,301 times
Reputation: 19990

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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
Since you like fruit sorbets I thought you might like to try this one, it's one of my favorites: Blackberry Sorbet ...

If you like coconut, check out Post #4 in this thread:Coconut cream ice cream in an old fashioned ice cream maker?

for a ridiculously easy coconut ice cream that always gets great reviews from anyone I give it to.
That blackberry sorbet sounds fantastic -- I will definitely try that next summer (ha! as if I will wait that long! ).

Alas, I don't like coconut unless it's coconut milk used in Thai cooking. Just never developed a taste for it otherwise.
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Old 11-24-2018, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
427 posts, read 98,858 times
Reputation: 468
Thumbs down Don't buy a Krups La Glaciere ice cream maker!

Just don't buy a Krups La Glaciere!

The tub has to be kept in the freezer. After a short while the metal interior corrodes and the freezing liquid leaks out, and then the entire thing is unusable.
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Old 11-24-2018, 01:53 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,975 posts, read 19,374,081 times
Reputation: 25581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
Just don't buy a Krups La Glaciere!

The tub has to be kept in the freezer. After a short while the metal interior corrodes and the freezing liquid leaks out, and then the entire thing is unusable.
That's the one I have. Mine has not had any problems. Maybe you got a bad one?
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Old 11-24-2018, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
6,842 posts, read 12,019,301 times
Reputation: 19990
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
That's the one I have. Mine has not had any problems. Maybe you got a bad one?
I was thinking the same thing! Cuisinart uses the same kind of thing (i.e. a bowl that you keep frozen) and I have 3-4 of those bowls and have not had a problem with ANY of them. So I think that poster may have gotten a bad one.
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Old 11-24-2018, 08:51 PM
 
2,848 posts, read 1,073,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
Since you like fruit sorbets I thought you might like to try this one, it's one of my favorites:


Blackberry Sorbet
1 1/4 cups sugar
1 cup water
24 oz. fresh blackberries
2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1Tbsp Blackberry Brandy/Whiskey
Makes about 1 quart of sorbet
Make the simple syrup
Combine the sugar and water in a medium-sized saucepan.
Bring the mixture to a boil. Let it boil for maybe 2 minutes, just to be sure that all the sugar is dissolved.
Remove the pot from the heat. Cool the mixture to room temperature, then pop it in the fridge (or freezer, if you want to hurry it along) to chill it completely.
Puree the blackberries and simple syrup
When your simple syrup is completely chilled, you’re ready to make your sorbet. Grab your blackberries. Pick through them quickly and discard any that are bruised or otherwise suspect looking.
Put about half of the berries in the blender.
Pour in about half of the chilled simple syrup.
Puree on high for maybe 30 seconds, until the berries are completely liquified.
Strain the blackberry mixture
Set a strainer over a large bowl. Pour the blackberry mixture through the strainer
Blend and strain the remaining blackberries and simple syrup. Then pour the lemon juice into the strained mixture. Stir to combine.
Add 1 TBSP Blackberry Brandy/Whiskey
Freeze the sorbet mixture
Because you chilled the simple syrup, your mixture should still be fairly cold. Pour it into your ice cream maker. Process according to the manufacturer’s instructions.


If you like coconut, check out Post #4 in this thread:Coconut cream ice cream in an old fashioned ice cream maker?


for a ridiculously easy coconut ice cream that always gets great reviews from anyone I give it to.
Can I use Chambord instead of brandy/whiskey? Blackberries grow here and I usually make a mean black and blue pie, but I think I'm going to have to skip it this coming year.

I already copied that coconut one into my recipe folder.
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Old 11-25-2018, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,997 posts, read 7,581,137 times
Reputation: 32616
Quote:
Originally Posted by grampaTom View Post
I am not happy with my Kitchen Aid ice cream attachment.
Best ice cream maker ai have ever used was a White Mountain with a wood bucket and a hand crank.
Absolutely agree! I've had mine for decades and it is work but you get the best ice cream - not "goop". But it has to be manual - electric versions just aren't strong enough. It can be fun if you have a couple helpers to trade off holding it down and cranking.
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:28 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,466 posts, read 39,165,224 times
Reputation: 27622
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
Can I use Chambord instead of brandy/whiskey? Blackberries grow here and I usually make a mean black and blue pie, but I think I'm going to have to skip it this coming year.

I already copied that coconut one into my recipe folder.

Good question! IMO the alcohol content of brandy/whiskey does as much for the texture of the sorbet as it does for flavor. The original recipe (I forget where I found it) included no alcohol but I added the brandy for both flavor and texture. I were going to use Chambord at 16.5% alcohol I'd probably bump it up to 2-3 Tbsps. You'd certainly do little harm by starting at 1, the likely difference is it may freeze a bit harder.

I did the same with the coconut ice cream using the rum, it goes well with coconut and freezes slightly softer. Let us know if you try it, other than a coffee ice cream I'll list below, the coconut is the most ridiculously easy ice cream I've made.

The coffee ice cream came from a book called The Perfect Scoop I found at my local library, well worth looking for if you enjoy making and eating ice cream.


Coffee Ice Cream

600g Sweetened Condensed Milk
1 1/2 Cups Strongly Brewed Coffee
1/2 Cup Half & Half
Big Pinch of Ground Coffee

Whisk together, chill, freeze
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Old 11-25-2018, 01:15 PM
Status: "Postatem obscuri lateris nescitis" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,604 posts, read 2,952,461 times
Reputation: 6312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
Cuisinart usually gets top ratings among popularly priced ice cream machines.

I have never used this machine, but it is the one I would buy. An ice cream maker is something I simply cannot have in the house, or I would weigh 300 pounds. There are better or more expensive models, of course.

https://www.williams-sonoma.com/prod...Freezer%20Bowl

I would never buy anything by KitchenAid again. Their blender melted where the jar meets the base while I was making hummus, and they wanted $25 for a box in which I could send it back to them. They wouldn't let me use the original container, which I still had.
(Hope OP finds what they need.)

To me, an ice cream maker is like the waffle iron I caught on sale couple years ago. Nothing good comes of it, because everything that comes from it is "too" good.

I speak for me and no one else. Given such appliances, I will use them plenty. Waffle 4/days week kind of thing. Sure enough, I did actually turn up at 300 lbs and needed to go on an ND-supervised diet. Death by superlative food, whouda thunkit? 10K hungry Eritreans would be thrilled to have a waffle and if I could mail them one, with blueberry compote and a dash of whipped cream, I surely would.

Stuff like that is like buying a junkie a gorgeous, reusable needle kit with the finest surgical quality instruments. And I'll sure get high on the supply!

My bad, I will reiterate, and there are far too many hugely fat people in the US in-particular, but the last thing on earth I need...ever, under any circumstances, is "ice cream" which ounce-for-ounce is pure sugar in the form of candied chocolates, caramels, cream, processed raw sugar, and whatever else. A friggin' dish of it that I'd eat is 600 calories.

Again, I'm not born-again healthy or knocking the concept, if you're the type of person who can consume in moderation. I should try that sometime. But in my case, a cone from a place like Cold Stone Creamery literally 2x/YEAR is entirely sufficient (chuckle), that's as much as I dare. I can just see some fat kid with a metabolic disorder churning out ice cream on the sneak, and everyone wonders how he's suddenly 200lbs at 12 years old.

Yet about a third of Americans can indeed live in moderation. Power to you; I'm officially jealous!
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Old 11-26-2018, 12:28 AM
 
2,848 posts, read 1,073,506 times
Reputation: 5491
Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
Good question! IMO the alcohol content of brandy/whiskey does as much for the texture of the sorbet as it does for flavor. The original recipe (I forget where I found it) included no alcohol but I added the brandy for both flavor and texture. I were going to use Chambord at 16.5% alcohol I'd probably bump it up to 2-3 Tbsps. You'd certainly do little harm by starting at 1, the likely difference is it may freeze a bit harder.

I did the same with the coconut ice cream using the rum, it goes well with coconut and freezes slightly softer. Let us know if you try it, other than a coffee ice cream I'll list below, the coconut is the most ridiculously easy ice cream I've made.

The coffee ice cream came from a book called The Perfect Scoop I found at my local library, well worth looking for if you enjoy making and eating ice cream.


Coffee Ice Cream

600g Sweetened Condensed Milk
1 1/2 Cups Strongly Brewed Coffee
1/2 Cup Half & Half
Big Pinch of Ground Coffee

Whisk together, chill, freeze
Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream

Ingredients:
1 (14-ounce/400 g) can evaporated milk
1 (14-ounce/400 g) can sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) heavy cream
2 ounces (60 g) coffee beans, medium coarse ground (recommend Cafe du Mond in the can)
Seeds scraped from 1 vanilla bean, or 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
Generous pinch of fine-grain sea salt
TOPPINGS: Fine ground coffee, sea salt, store-bought caramel

Directions:
Combine the evaporated milk, condensed milk, cream, coffee, vanilla, and salt in a saucepan set over medium heat. Cook, whisking often, until the mixture begins to steam. Remove from the heat and let steep for 20 minutes.
Using a fine-meshed strainer or a coffee filter, strain the liquid into a bowl. Cover and chill for at least 3 hours, but preferably overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream maker’s directions.

To serve, top the Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream with a pinch of ground coffee, caramel and a pinch of sea salt.
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Old 11-26-2018, 08:55 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,466 posts, read 39,165,224 times
Reputation: 27622
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream

Ingredients:
1 (14-ounce/400 g) can evaporated milk
1 (14-ounce/400 g) can sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) heavy cream
2 ounces (60 g) coffee beans, medium coarse ground (recommend Cafe du Mond in the can)
Seeds scraped from 1 vanilla bean, or 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
Generous pinch of fine-grain sea salt
TOPPINGS: Fine ground coffee, sea salt, store-bought caramel

Directions:
Combine the evaporated milk, condensed milk, cream, coffee, vanilla, and salt in a saucepan set over medium heat. Cook, whisking often, until the mixture begins to steam. Remove from the heat and let steep for 20 minutes.
Using a fine-meshed strainer or a coffee filter, strain the liquid into a bowl. Cover and chill for at least 3 hours, but preferably overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream maker’s directions.

To serve, top the Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream with a pinch of ground coffee, caramel and a pinch of sea salt.


I'm gonna have to try this! At least I have the Cafe du Mond on the shelf, been drinking it for many years now, their beignet mix is pretty decent too.
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