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Old 12-26-2018, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,121 posts, read 1,333,382 times
Reputation: 1393

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Of the seven dinners during any given week, I cook about half of them. I usually follow French methods for cooking (but I will occasionally do something typically American like steak and riced potatoes or typically Italian like gnocchi).

The key for me to French cooking means following a few standard techniques:

1. Mise-en-place: Have all of your ingredients prepped and "in place" before you begin cooking
2. Knife skills: Know how to use the knives, and know the purpose of each ingredient, which will usually dictate its cut size
3. Saute on the stove, finish in the oven
4. Taste and season at each step along the way. I lightly salt every vegetable during assembly, yes, even in something like a mirepoix stew-base
5. Sauce the dish: Know how to make the basic sauces, and always finish with butter after the heat is off

French cuisine does not mean only heavy foods, although the main courses often are. A light or bright salad is often served with each meal in France.
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Old 12-26-2018, 01:49 PM
 
Location: SE Florida
849 posts, read 187,513 times
Reputation: 2065
Love French influenced Cajun and Creole food. Had a bad experience in Marseille. Thinking the French add "ette" to words indicating petite. Being familiar with Cajun Andouille sausage and thinking Andouiette were mini versions, I ordered it. Big mistake! Not fond of tripe. I managed to eat it until the mustard sauce ran out. Found an Italian place around the corner for the rest of my stay. I called the experience "The French Misconnection".
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Old 12-26-2018, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,976 posts, read 4,226,452 times
Reputation: 25321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taz22 View Post
My favorite French cookbook is Susan Loomis, French Farmhouse cookbook. The recipes are rustic French instead of fancy cuisine. Itís easy to imagine French farmers going out to the garden for fresh produce, maybe a trip to the henhouse. Iíve tried most recipes in the book, itís not much effort to prepare a roast chicken with tarragon, green beans with walnuts and a loaf of bread. Really good, basic food.

https://www.amazon.com/French-Farmho...ustomerReviews



Here is a version of French dauphinois potatoes that I always make and had it yesterday with the ham. So amazingly good. The French have mastered the art of potatoes better than anyone.

https://www.thespruceeats.com/gratin...recipe-1375736


Oh, thanks! Those potatoes sound rich and so tasty....I do tend to cook more rustic than fancy but enjoy trying new dishes.
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Old 12-26-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,976 posts, read 4,226,452 times
Reputation: 25321
Quote:
Originally Posted by westender View Post
Of the seven dinners during any given week, I cook about half of them. I usually follow French methods for cooking (but I will occasionally do something typically American like steak and riced potatoes or typically Italian like gnocchi).

The key for me to French cooking means following a few standard techniques:

1. Mise-en-place: Have all of your ingredients prepped and "in place" before you begin cooking
2. Knife skills: Know how to use the knives, and know the purpose of each ingredient, which will usually dictate its cut size
3. Saute on the stove, finish in the oven
4. Taste and season at each step along the way. I lightly salt every vegetable during assembly, yes, even in something like a mirepoix stew-base
5. Sauce the dish: Know how to make the basic sauces, and always finish with butter after the heat is off

French cuisine does not mean only heavy foods, although the main courses often are. A light or bright salad is often served with each meal in France.

Thanks for the primer....

I just bought (used) Child's The Way to Cook, which likely starts off in the way you describe....with standard
techniques. Need to improve my knife skills...
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Old 12-26-2018, 02:04 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,377 posts, read 39,113,165 times
Reputation: 27559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogboa View Post
Love French influenced Cajun and Creole food. Had a bad experience in Marseille. Thinking the French add "ette" to words indicating petite. Being familiar with Cajun Andouille sausage and thinking Andouiette were mini versions, I ordered it. Big mistake! Not fond of tripe. I managed to eat it until the mustard sauce ran out. Found an Italian place around the corner for the rest of my stay. I called the experience "The French Misconnection".

I was in a restaurant in Montreal once with two natives of France who thought it great fun talking me into ordering the Andouiette which in my case was tripe sausage. My only response was it can't hold a candle to a good kielbasa.
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Old 12-26-2018, 02:07 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,377 posts, read 39,113,165 times
Reputation: 27559
Quote:
Originally Posted by westender View Post
Of the seven dinners during any given week, I cook about half of them. I usually follow French methods for cooking (but I will occasionally do something typically American like steak and riced potatoes or typically Italian like gnocchi).

The key for me to French cooking means following a few standard techniques:

1. Mise-en-place: Have all of your ingredients prepped and "in place" before you begin cooking
2. Knife skills: Know how to use the knives, and know the purpose of each ingredient, which will usually dictate its cut size
3. Saute on the stove, finish in the oven
4. Taste and season at each step along the way. I lightly salt every vegetable during assembly, yes, even in something like a mirepoix stew-base
5. Sauce the dish: Know how to make the basic sauces, and always finish with butter after the heat is off

French cuisine does not mean only heavy foods, although the main courses often are. A light or bright salad is often served with each meal in France.

I'm far from the most organized person but became a practitioner of mise-en-place simply from watching cooking shows, at least for me it makes cooking more enjoyable.
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Old 12-26-2018, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,275 posts, read 25,802,189 times
Reputation: 25393
Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
I was in a restaurant in Montreal once with two natives of France who thought it great fun talking me into ordering the Andouiette which in my case was tripe sausage. My only response was it can't hold a candle to a good kielbasa.
There are only hundreds of French restaurants in Montreal but I need to guess... Le Mas des Oliviers?
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Old 12-26-2018, 03:01 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,377 posts, read 39,113,165 times
Reputation: 27559
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
There are only hundreds of French restaurants in Montreal but I need to guess... Le Mas des Oliviers?

It was in the early 2000s so Doh!

All I remember is it being a pretty nice place and wishing I'd stuck to my initial want of Osso Bucco. But I did rise to the challenge and finish my meal.
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Old 12-26-2018, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,275 posts, read 25,802,189 times
Reputation: 25393
Being from Montreal, where French is the most prominent food/style, it was so available to me that I never made it at home. EXCEPT -- and you, my cheese friend, will appreciate this -- cheese fondue. That I made. Granted, beautiful French cheeses are also in abundance in Montreal but I know that you happen to have a source.
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Old 12-26-2018, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,976 posts, read 4,226,452 times
Reputation: 25321
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Being from Montreal, where French is the most prominent food/style, it was so available to me that I never made it at home. EXCEPT -- and you, my cheese friend, will appreciate this -- cheese fondue. That I made. Granted, beautiful French cheeses are also in abundance in Montreal but I know that you happen to have a source.

Oh lucky you....from Montreal! Cheese anything....fondue included

Is there a special mail order place in Montreal you like for their cheeses?
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