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Old 12-27-2018, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,297 posts, read 1,758,510 times
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Cook's Illustrated is my go-to when learning new dishes. They have conducted exhaustive tests and as a result they have been able to modernized recipes for classic dishes like these. It's even worth paying a couple of dollars per month to have full access to their videos and reviews.
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Old 12-27-2018, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,987 posts, read 4,235,016 times
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[quote=ShouldIMoveOrStayPut...?;53986872]..........

This comment does not get three Michelin stars...

Julia's Boeuf Bourguignon described as "basically just a stew?" Is there a French recipe for eating one's words?...


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Old 12-27-2018, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,987 posts, read 4,235,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AguaDulce View Post
try it with white wine

I make a version with ww....very good
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Old 12-27-2018, 09:32 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,389 posts, read 39,127,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShouldIMoveOrStayPut...? View Post
..........

This comment does not get three Michelin stars...

Julia's Boeuf Bourguignon described as "basically just a stew?" Is there a French recipe for eating one's words?...

Nah, but there is a French recipe for beef stew, which as far as I'm concerned is beef seared in fat and then braised in a liquid(s) along with some vegetables and seasonings et voila!: beef stew, no matter how elegantly it may be named. It's making a meal, not rocket science.

Last edited by burdell; 12-27-2018 at 10:02 AM..
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Old 12-28-2018, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
9,453 posts, read 3,219,225 times
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Personally I think the French do wonderful Souffle dishes, which are quite technical, they also do magnificent rich sauces and of course they also have fatastic pastry chefs.

I really like a light Souffle dish, usually accompanied by a delicious sauce and the French excel in terms of fine dining.

As for stews and other such hearty dishes, most people across the world have similar dishes, although the French do like to add a good drop red wine and the dishes are usually very satisfying.
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Old 12-28-2018, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
70,093 posts, read 80,746,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Have any of you good cooks branched out to serious French cooking?

I have bought (used) Julia Child's book The French Chef that went along with her tv show of the same name years ago. She and another chef authored Mastering the Art of French Cooking, 2 vols. that delved deeply into French cooking and was very well received but likely too involved for me.

What type of French recipes have you made?
Is the extra time needed and long lists of ingredients intimidating or not?
Do you find most ingredients needed here in the US for French dishes?
So you just bought a Julia Child's cook book and I am taking mine to the thrift shop next week. I do some french cooking, but mostly I like to make French sauces and those recipes, if I have not memorized them are on line. I do make crepes often, both sweet for a dessert and savory for an entree. They are really easy and so good.

Yes, you can find the ingredients right here in the good ole USA
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,987 posts, read 4,235,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
So you just bought a Julia Child's cook book and I am taking mine to the thrift shop next week. I do some french cooking, but mostly I like to make French sauces and those recipes, if I have not memorized them are on line. I do make crepes often, both sweet for a dessert and savory for an entree. They are really easy and so good.

Yes, you can find the ingredients right here in the good ole USA
Yes, I'm behind in French sauces, crepes, etc. Souffles I love... so might start there...
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Old 12-30-2018, 01:41 PM
 
Location: SE Florida
290 posts, read 53,487 times
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We've made boeuf bourgugon and coq au vin, as well as mostly savory crepes, although a few sweet, and souffles, both savory and sweet. When we have Hollandaise, I make it from scratch, can't stand the powder or jarred/canned ones. Sammies like Croque Madame and Croque Monsieur. Ratatouille. I even tackled a Foie Gras au torchon with some leftover foie gras from a full foie gras I received as a gift. We used about half of the liver in seared dishes and then I made the torchon. Documented doing this on another forum. It was quite interesting getting that thing wrapped to hang and cure. I've made pate a choux for both sweet and savory dishes, including gougeres, which I love. We occasionally get French or Italian black truffles and the dishes I use them in run about half Italian and half French or French based. Probably have made a lot of other things I can't remember. I think a lot of us cook French or dishes based in French cooking without realizing it.

Last edited by Medtran49; 12-30-2018 at 01:50 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 04:39 PM
 
4,508 posts, read 5,031,181 times
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What is the most popular/common type of cookware in France home kitchens? While le Creuset is the most famous French cookware in the U.S., it doesn't necessarily mean it's the most popular in France--but is it?


It seems the French eat a lot of meat and seafood, for which cast iron (w/ or w/o enamel) is often used?
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Old Yesterday, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,275 posts, read 25,807,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowmountains View Post
What is the most popular/common type of cookware in France home kitchens? While le Creuset is the most famous French cookware in the U.S., it doesn't necessarily mean it's the most popular in France--but is it?


It seems the French eat a lot of meat and seafood, for which cast iron (w/ or w/o enamel) is often used?
I don't think there are many French-from-France people on this forum to answer this question but it seems that Cristel is well-known there.

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C...60.LxdLsfjz-2k
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