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Old Yesterday, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,668 posts, read 4,127,217 times
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Have any of you good cooks branched out to serious French cooking?

I have bought (used) Julia Child's book The French Chef that went along with her tv show of the same name years ago. She and another chef authored Mastering the Art of French Cooking, 2 vols. that delved deeply into French cooking and was very well received but likely too involved for me.

What type of French recipes have you made?
Is the extra time needed and long lists of ingredients intimidating or not?
Do you find most ingredients needed here in the US for French dishes?
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Old Yesterday, 11:44 AM
Status: "Elect a clown? Expect a circus!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,078 posts, read 38,972,071 times
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I've done Bouef Bourguignon and Coq au Vin which are basically just stews and not all that involved, may have even been Julia's recipes, just things I picked off the 'net when I felt like cooking.


I cut the following from the NYT last month and want to try it. Of course I don't have the right size tart pan.


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/21/m...at-quiche.html
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Old Yesterday, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,591 posts, read 16,977,390 times
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My mother-in-law and I made coq au vin together from Julia's recipe in a 1970's era cookbook she had after watching the movie Julie and Julia. It got every pan in the kitchen dirty and we never wanted to make a Julia recipe again.

The stew was good and very well received by the guests, but neither of us had much taste for it at that point.
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Old Yesterday, 11:52 AM
 
5,445 posts, read 3,140,235 times
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When Jackie Kennedy was in the White House French cooking was popular. I became practiced at making both sweet and savory crepes. They were great for us on a budget as they lent themselves well to using leftover meats. Just add a sauce, run under the broiler and,voila, instant gourmet! I picked up an old Sunset crepes cookbook at a second hand store that has served me well.

I often use a quiche in the same manner - as a vehicle to dress up leftover veggies and meat.

Then there's that wonderful puff pastry that you can buy frozen that will have you looking like an expert at desserts. Many times I've read those explanations about how you can do this by hand but I've never had the time nor courage to give it a go.
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Old Yesterday, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,668 posts, read 4,127,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
I've done Bouef Bourguignon and Coq au Vin which are basically just stews and not all that involved, may have even been Julia's recipes, just things I picked off the 'net when I felt like cooking.


I cut the following from the NYT last month and want to try it. Of course I don't have the right size tart pan.


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/21/m...at-quiche.html

Love quiche with Gruyere...I know it's annoying when recipes use pans that are not standard...
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Old Yesterday, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,668 posts, read 4,127,217 times
Reputation: 24898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
My mother-in-law and I made coq au vin together from Julia's recipe in a 1970's era cookbook she had after watching the movie Julie and Julia. It got every pan in the kitchen dirty and we never wanted to make a Julia recipe again.

The stew was good and very well received by the guests, but neither of us had much taste for it at that point.

Loved that movie...

I've made Coq au Vin but not by her recipe. That's what I thought....after using so many ingredients do you even have a taste for the completed dish??!!
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Old Yesterday, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,668 posts, read 4,127,217 times
Reputation: 24898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
When Jackie Kennedy was in the White House French cooking was popular. I became practiced at making both sweet and savory crepes. They were great for us on a budget as they lent themselves well to using leftover meats. Just add a sauce, run under the broiler and,voila, instant gourmet! I picked up an old Sunset crepes cookbook at a second hand store that has served me well.

I often use a quiche in the same manner - as a vehicle to dress up leftover veggies and meat.

Then there's that wonderful puff pastry that you can buy frozen that will have you looking like an expert at desserts. Many times I've read those explanations about how you can do this by hand but I've never had the time nor courage to give it a go.

Crepes! So versatile....I've made a blue million quiches over the years, again so versatile. I'm with you on pp...no way do I want to spend an entire day making by hand

I'd like to focus on sauces...
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Old Yesterday, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
1,194 posts, read 397,370 times
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My favorite French cookbook is Susan Loomis, French Farmhouse cookbook. The recipes are rustic French instead of fancy cuisine. Itís easy to imagine French farmers going out to the garden for fresh produce, maybe a trip to the henhouse. Iíve tried most recipes in the book, itís not much effort to prepare a roast chicken with tarragon, green beans with walnuts and a loaf of bread. Really good, basic food.

https://www.amazon.com/French-Farmho...ustomerReviews



Here is a version of French dauphinois potatoes that I always make and had it yesterday with the ham. So amazingly good. The French have mastered the art of potatoes better than anyone.

https://www.thespruceeats.com/gratin...recipe-1375736

Last edited by Taz22; Yesterday at 12:14 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 12:13 PM
Status: "Elect a clown? Expect a circus!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,078 posts, read 38,972,071 times
Reputation: 27402
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Crepes! So versatile....I've made a blue million quiches over the years, again so versatile. I'm with you on pp...no way do I want to spend an entire day making by hand

I'd like to focus on sauces...

Not French bur since puff pastry is in play .........................

I grew up in a town with a large Portuguese community, all the local cafes served these and they're really good with coffee, best eaten the day they're made:


Portuguese Custard Tarts

Ingredients
3 egg yolks (I prefer 2 egg yolks and 1 whole egg)
115g /4ozs superfine sugar
2 tbsp corn starch
230ml/8.11fl ozs Cream (I don't use cream, I use milk)
170ml/6fl ozs Milk
2 tsp vanilla extract (I use Queen Vanilla Bean Paste)
300g/10.6 ozs rolled puff pastry (I use one sheet of puff pastry)
Method
Step 1 - Lightly grease a 12-hole 80ml muffin tray.
Step 2 - Put the egg yolks, sugar and corn starch in a pan and whisk together. Gradually whisk in the cream and milk until smooth.
Step 3 - Place the pan over a medium heat and cook, stirring, until the mixture thickens and comes to the boil. Remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla extract. Transfer the custard to a bowl, cover the surface with cling film to prevent a skin forming and leave to cool.
Step 4 - Preheat the oven to 400F.
Step 5 - Cut the pastry dough sheet in half, put one half on top of the other and set aside for 5 minutes. Roll up the pastry tightly from the short end and cut the pastry log into 12 x 1cm rounds. Lay each pastry round on a lightly floured surface and use a rolling pin to roll out until each is 10cm in diameter.
Step 6 - Press the pastry rounds into the muffin tin. Spoon the cooled custard into the pastry cases and bake for 20-25 minutes, or until the pastry and custard are golden. Leave the tarts in the tin for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
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Old Yesterday, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,591 posts, read 16,977,390 times
Reputation: 26010
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Loved that movie...

I've made Coq au Vin but not by her recipe. That's what I thought....after using so many ingredients do you even have a taste for the completed dish??!!
I feel the same way if I bake a bunch of cookies all day.. can't eat any of them!

Until the next day, of course.
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