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Old 12-30-2018, 09:14 AM
 
17,537 posts, read 22,588,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
I lead workshops cooking on an open fire. We make breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert in three hours from start to finish (minus building the fire; that's not part of the workshop). Breakfast is usually a fritata cooked in a Dutch oven. Lunch is done in a modern-day foil pack. Dinner is something like a whole chicken, meat loaf or pork roast in a Dutch oven with potatoes and root vegetables. Dessert is a cake baked in a Dutch oven or Hobo pies in cast iron. It's more time consuming than standing in the kitchen with heat the push of a button but it's worth it.
do you cook wild game over a spit??
id sign up for that class
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Old 12-30-2018, 12:55 PM
 
Location: equator
2,835 posts, read 1,220,052 times
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Oh sure. Spent several years back-country wilderness camping---dutch oven and wood fires. It was really fun and creative. Back when I could squat, LOL.

I once made a pineapple-upside-down cake in an ancient wood cook-stove.
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Old 12-30-2018, 01:36 PM
 
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my Dad collected cookbooks and restaurant "house recipe cookbooks" from the late 1880's era through to the 1930's and I inherited them … after many years of having tried various recipes from them.

We've had a Waterford Stanley wood cookstove as a central item in our living room for the last 20 years, and prior to that a Waterford box woodstove as a feature in the main living space of our house in Colorado.

The Stanley gets used a lot during the winter months (as we use it for supplemental heating) for stove-top and oven cooking; I've roasted a 25 lb turkey in a large cast iron roaster. It's common to use a dutch oven simmering a slow cook item on the hob, or a cast iron griddle for breakfast meal items. The older box stove saw a lot of use with dutch ovens for soups, stews, and roasts.

Many of the older recipes, such as creole or French cooking required slow cooking and were devised when cast iron and woodstoves were common. They are quite enjoyable today, especially the slow cooked fish or hearty meat stews. Such specialty items as a whole stuffed cabbage are unusual today due to a lot of prep and cooking time, but are worth the effort.
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:42 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,105 posts, read 16,911,287 times
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I really like this online cookbook of medieval European recipes which you can filter by country and category as well as search.

I like the fact that the entries contain the original text as well as a modern recipe format and sometimes some commentary.

Medieval Recipes
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Old 12-31-2018, 09:48 PM
 
3,222 posts, read 597,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I really like this online cookbook of medieval European recipes which you can filter by country and category as well as search.

I like the fact that the entries contain the original text as well as a modern recipe format and sometimes some commentary.

Medieval Recipes

Interestingly enough, I inherited a cookbook from my aunt from the 1920s from Germany. (it was barely used!)

I looked at some of those recipes in your reference, and looked for similar ones in it. Very, very similar. Boy, they sure didn't understand healthy cooking!


The script is similar to this, which I kinda sorta can read, but it's been a few decades since I learned it. It takes me a few stabs at it to get it right.

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Old 12-31-2018, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,331 posts, read 3,798,128 times
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For me, old school is making my own cakes from scratch! No Betty Crocker cake mixes in this house unless it is called for in a recipe, including my own other ingredients.

Same with pie crusts. Nothing beats home made from scratch.
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Old 12-31-2018, 10:09 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
34,412 posts, read 52,906,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normstad View Post
You may want to reconsider the website Mercola.com as a source. It is highly questionable.

https://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/mercola.html

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/9-r...-natural-news/

https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/mercola/

And from wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph...arning_letters
Mercola has been the subject of a number of United States Food and Drug Administration warning letters related to his activities:

02/16/2005 - Living Fuel RX(TM) and Coconut Oil Products - For marketing products for a medical use which classifies those products as drugs in violation of 201(g)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.[6][44]
09/21/2006 - Optimal Wellness Center - For both labeling and marketing health supplements for purposes that would render them to be classified as regulated drugs as well as failing to provide adequate directions for use on the label in the event that they were legally sold as drugs.[6][45]
03/11/2011 - Re: Meditherm Med2000 Infrared cameras - Mercola was accused of violating federal law by making claims about the efficacy of certain uses of a telethermographic camera exceeding those approved by the FDA concerning the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of the device (regulation of such claims being within the purview of the FDA).[46]
12/16/2011 - Milk Specialties Global - Wautoma - Failure to have tested for purity, strength, identity, and composition his "Dr. Mercola Vitamin K2" and other products.[47]


Mercola often quotes other sources. You should not blindly believe what they say, but research other sources and make your own mind.

Back on topic: what does it mean "old school cooking"? If that means cooking from scratch, then I am "old school" all the way.
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Last edited by elnina; 01-01-2019 at 12:41 AM..
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:56 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,933 posts, read 26,156,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
do you cook wild game over a spit??
id sign up for that class
Have you watched A Taste of History on PBS?
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Old 01-01-2019, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,376 posts, read 22,371,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Mercola often quotes other sources. You should not blindly believe what they say, but research other sources and make your own mind.

Back on topic: what does it mean "old school cooking"? If that means cooking from scratch, then I am "old school" all the way.
Gathering wild foods and chopping wood to build the fire with which to cook it? Like that's going to happen. LOL
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Old 01-03-2019, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
709 posts, read 371,072 times
Reputation: 1926
Grandad was a chuck wagon cook, and he taught me, so I guess that's pretty old school. His dutch oven on an open fire peach cobbler and rhubarb pie were amazing. Have cooked on open fires, camp stoves, wood stoves, early gas and electric stoves (my relatives weren't big on changing technology), natural gas stoves, propane stoves, and electric (not to mention our big smoker). I like natural gas and open fires the best.

Have used family recipes dating back into the early 19th century. I regularly use recipes derived from "Foods of the Frontier" by Gertrude Harris and "The Roman Cookery of Apicius" by John Edwards.

And now I'll be all over that YouTube channel. Thanks for the link.
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